HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Tom's new(?) views on freshness. (2 msgs / 50 lines)
1) From: HeatGunRoast
Tom,
Maybe I've been snoozin' but your statement in the Jan-Feb "Tiny Joy" surprised me. 
In particular, "When I started in the trade we would talk about green coffee being
'fresh' for 2 years or more.  WE WERE WRONG! (emphasis in original) It was a fiction
that we told ourselves as roasters . . ."
The rest of the article gives interesting info on the chemistry of freshness.
Appreciated for general understanding, but difficult for me to apply to my
particular stash and purchasing decisions. It's hard to know just what to make of
not "2 years or more," which could mean anything from use immediately, less than a
year, less than 2, etc.  If you could say something resembling a "general rule,"
that would be great.  If no general rule applies, maybe some more convenient info. 
f
For example, considering the critical importance the article gives to freshness,
maybe you could add to the great new labels the coffee's harvest month or season (if
just the year would be overly broad). I know that these data can be gotten from the
reviews (usually?), but attaching them to the labels would sure help with "stash
management."  Also, although an "expiration date" would be inappropriate (no way for
you to know if I'm storing my coffee on a mountain top or swamp), perhaps you could
have an informal code that would indicate a bean's "relative" longevity.  In
particular, if the bean or blend would be likely to stay fresh somewhat longer,
somewhat shorter, or about average compared to other varieties.  Sounds like a lot,
but a date or season and a check, minus, or plus might do do it.
Martin
=====
Martin
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool. Try it!http://webhosting.yahoo.com/ps/sb/

2) From: Rick W
I thought my greens were good for 3 years or whenever Tom sells those
Ball Widemouth Mason jars (whichever comes first).
Rick Waits
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest