HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 2 questions (17 msgs / 248 lines)
1) From: Dean Powers
First I am getting ready to place my first order for green beans. I was
wondering about input on if it is better to buy the intro sample pack or
a couple of pounds of one kind?   If so what would be the best for first
time roaster. I plan on using them with a cone filter and a espresso
maker.
The next question is more of a comment with a request for comments. My
roommate picked me up a Briel Indo Espresso maker at a thrift store
yesterday. (new in the box for 10 dollars) can I use the same bean but
change the roast? Any comments on the Briel machine?
Dean
Want to help when a kid is missing?http://fourthekids.org

2) From: Richard
Dean Powers wrote:
<Snip>
 I would say sample pack. Or if one bean, then a mild central or
southamerican to experiment with.
<Snip>
You can use single origin beans for espresso, however, most will agree
that for espresso a blend will be better. For espresso it is not the
roast which makes it espresso, it's the preparation. There are dark and
light roasts (as well as different roast degrees within a blend) for
espresso. It is a matter of preference.
Richard
-- 
Richard Schwaninger
"Consider what you want to do in relation to what you are capable
of doing. Mounainteering is above all a matter of integrity".
Gaston Rebuffat

3) From: Chris Schaefer
Dean,
	You will hear a fair amount of conjecture when it comes to roast styles and roast application.  (drip vs. espresso vs. press vs. moka vs. vacuum vs etc).
If you're going to settle in only two brewing methods (drip and espresso), I would suggest one pounders of a handful of varieties.  
For espresso, for example, a BASE, and ENHANCERS.  Your base could be a Colombian or Brazilian and your enhancers Central Americans and Africans.  Centrals I'd recommend: Costa Ricans, Guats, and Panamanian.  Africans: Ethiopians, Ugandan, and possibly a Tanzanian.
This allows you to take any one of those beans and drink them singularly in drip, or blend if you should so choose.
As far as roast style goes, this is entirely up to your palate.  Some of us prefer darker roasts for both drip and espresso.  Some prefer lighter.  Some prefer a light roast for drip but a dark roast for espresso.  Some prefer vice versa.
That's why I think 1 pound of each will do you well.  And should you not like a particular bean depsite roasting it one way or another, 1 pound will be gone and done with soon enough.
My $0.02,
Gonzo
ps- if you have questions about your espresso machine, once you get settled in to using it frequently, there are some great FAQs available.  Deja search the alt.coffee newsgroup for their locations/owners.

4) From: Michael Allen Smith
<Snip>
Check product reviews here:http://www.coffeekid.com/reviews/mas

5) From: drg
Dean,
   I recommend the sample pack plus a pound of the Monkey Blend.
       Jim Gundlach
          roasting in a wok
             on a wood stove
               to grind in
                  a Solis
                    to brew in a
                       Coffee Gaggia
<Snip>

6) From: Craig Shields
Hey all!  Since my POS Rosto has worked for all of 2
months since Jan 2003 (and Steve doesn't return
e-mails or calls), I've given up and am trying
whirly-pop until the new I-Roast comes out.
1)  Is there any information about when the I-Roast
will be in?
2)  What's the best way to cool beans that come out of
the whirley-pop?
Thanks a million!
Do you Yahoo!?
Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover

7) From: Bill Cutts
<Snip>
I had always just dumped them between two colanders outside once I finished the roast (I roast outside on my grill's side burner so I'm out there anyway) although sometimes on a windless summer day I'd have to put an electric fan outside to get enough cooling so that I didn't have to dump them back and forth more than a couple dozen times.
With the new "whirley-pop" that Tom's selling I can roast more beans per batch and cooling the result was taking too many back and forth cycles - I was getting tired and bored. So lately I've been setting up a sheet pan in front of an electric fan and dumping the beans out onto it so that they're in a big, spread out layer. Stir them around a few times to get all the beans into the air flow and to help release the chaff and I'm done.

8) From: DEchelbarg
That is the manual roaster right?  I just dump them back and forth between 
two steel mesh colanders.

9) From: Ben Treichel
Craig Shields wrote:
<Snip>
May, June, July, August, September, ...
2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 ....
Pick the month and year that makes you the happiest. It won't be right, 
but you will be 'the happiest'.
Ben
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

10) From: Wandering John
So - any takers on who gets out first - Longhorn or I-Roast?
On Monday 10 May 2004 10:51 am, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: John Blumel
On May 10, 2004, at 2:36pm, Wandering John wrote:
<Snip>
Do they have to work or just be released?
If they have to work, the II-Roast (that's version 2 that will also be 
approved for nautical use) will be first. If they just have to be 
released, it's anyone's guess.
John Blumel

12) From: Craig Shields
Thanks to all who responded.  Hopefully this will get
me through the dark days until either the I-Roast
comes out or Steve from Brightway starts returning
e-mails.  I'm not holding my breath for either!  :)
Do you Yahoo!?
Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover

13) From: Craig Shields
Thanks to all who responded.  Hopefully this will get
me through the dark days until either the I-Roast
comes out or Steve from Brightway starts returning
e-mails.  I'm not holding my breath for either!  :)
Do you Yahoo!?
Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover

14) From: DEchelbarg
Dark Days?  If I recall correctly you are roasting with a manual popper?  I 
am using a steel Back to Basics Unit and the roasts are easily controllable and 
fantastic.  I have an I roast ordered but it will have to go some to beat 
what I'm producing with the manual popper on a cook stove.  I have some wonderful 
profiles and roasts that usually produce the 1st crack at 13 minutes.  No 
stalling, just a very deliberate climb of temps.  This is a great method.  It is 
a hands on method that teaches you a lot about roasting.  Good luck.
Dave Echelbarger

15) From: Jeff Wikstrom
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yeah man  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of
DEchelbarg
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2004 2:55 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Re: 2 Questions
Dark Days?  If I recall correctly you are roasting with a manual popper?  I
am using a steel Back to Basics Unit and the roasts are easily controllable
and fantastic.  I have an I roast ordered but it will have to go some to
beat what I'm producing with the manual popper on a cook stove.  I have some
wonderful profiles and roasts that usually produce the 1st crack at 13
minutes.  No stalling, just a very deliberate climb of temps.  This is a
great method.  It is a hands on method that teaches you a lot about
roasting.  Good luck.
Dave Echelbarger

16) From: Felix Dial
About how long does it take to cool beans to room temp using the two
colanders?
Thanks,
  Felix

17) From: DEchelbarg
I'm guessing two minutes --  maybe less. Usually just walk around the yard 
pouring back and forth.  Really easy way to get rid of the chaff.  Just blows 
away.


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