HomeRoast Digest


Topic: [coffee] Re: Bollinger roaster was +Jabez Burns sample roaster? (23 msgs / 394 lines)
1) From: Rick Farris
Alchemist John (as well as a few others) writes:
<Snip>
It is not!  I can't take it any more.  I've been waiting for someone to
hop on this, but a rectangular drum is the worst shape I can imagine.
:-)
The reason drums are round is so that the beans remain a more-or-less
constant distance from the heat source.
Not only that, but a rectangular drum would quickly beat the beans to
pieces.
Sheesh, people!  Think!
-- Rick

2) From: Oaxaca Charlie
 I'm with you, Rick, regarding a squared drum.  That old time
roaster that Ben pointed out, that's off-set so it rocks as it
spins, would do a more gentle and effective bean mixing. A
square drum would be a noisy beast, too (bam bam bam)
  Charlie
--- Rick Farris  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings=====
Brick Oven Roasting in British Columbia
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Finance: Get your refund fast by filing online.http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html

3) From: John Abbott (wandering
Well they had to troll pretty deep, but they are finally beginning to
hook some :o))   I have seen square boxes used to flavor coffee in a
couple of shops - but I guess it wouldn't matter there anyway because
they intend to destroy the beans :o))
On Thu, 2004-02-12 at 10:56, Oaxaca Charlie wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Ben Treichel
No troll here John, I actually think that it will work good. Just didn't 
bother to defend the idea.
Ben
John Abbott (wandering Texas) wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

5) From: John Abbott
On Thu, 2004-02-12 at 12:29, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>
Oh, I wasn't even into the idea itself but Rick's inability to stand
back from it :o))   If you are roasting large amounts I can see where
the mixing action might be greater, but I'm wondering about the
distribution of the heat.  I suspect the reason that there are few
(any?) square drums out there is the mathematics of capacity.  If you
scribe a square within a circle (the rotation) you will see the loss of
volume.   I don't believe that there would be any damage to the beans
any more than there would be by the vanes in my drum carrying beans and
dropping them. 
John - drinking the absolute best Guatemalan I have ever had - waiting
on Brown to bring my new stuff

6) From: Ben Treichel
John Abbott wrote:
<Snip>
Exactly. You have to have a larger heated area to 'swing' a rectangular 
drum in. However at low rpm's you get great mixing motion w/o vanes etc. 
Then you are just pouring the beans from side to side.
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

7) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
I can't see any problems with a square "drum"   I doubt it would be any 
more traumatic for beans than the vanes we have to add to the round 
ones to keep the beans from sliding and scorching.  I can see it making 
much more noise either.  What I can see a structure that makes it a lot 
easier to have a door to add and remove beans through.
    Jim Gundlach
On Feb 12, 2004, at 10:56 AM, Oaxaca Charlie wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Ben Treichel
and to build. its a lot easier to bend 4 90's than 360 1's ;-)
Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

9) From: Brian Hyde
How is the heat applied to the drum?  Is it radiant?  If so the corners 
will get hotter right?  
Brian
Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Actually it's harder to make 4 90's than one 360.  ;)
A cylinder is faster to roll than it is to make 4 breaks (bends).  Also, you can
use thinner material since curves are stronger than flats. There is a reason all
drum roasters have round drums. Perhaps a homebuilder is frightened by curves. I
imagine none have a roller or break. I can tell you my little drum was easy to
form by hand. It would have been more difficult for me to make a square. Dan

11) From: Ben Treichel
I now have a little, cheap break, but no roller.
Dan Bollinger wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

12) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Feb 12, 2004, at 3:03 PM, Brian Hyde wrote:
<Snip>
Mine rotates over a wood fire/coals.  The corners might be closer to 
the heat when pointed down but they will be further away when pointed 
up.  Should average the same.
Jim Gundlach

13) From: Dan Bollinger
Hey, ya gotta go with your strengths! May I suggest a hexagonal drum?  ;)
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can
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all
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curves. I
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to
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unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

14) From: Ron Kyle
A snip from Ken
<Snip>
Wow wait a minute, I considered going from a small 3 to 4 oz. Popper roast
to a 4 lb drum 10 steps forward.
But then again I may be somewhat bias.:O)
Ron Kyle
rnkylehttp://rnk10.tripod.com

15) From: Ed Needham
I really don't see how a square container would beat up the beans any more
than a cylindrical one with 1 1/2" lifting vanes.  The beans would be in a
constant state of motion as in a cylinder and would agitate in a fairly
constant pattern.  I doubt any one of us could tell the difference in a roast
from one or the other.  They may rest a bit longer on the container surface
so a faster gearmotor would be needed, but other than that, my guess is that
it would be a wash.
We won't know though until Ben tries it .
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

16) From: Ed Needham
I have a break, but covet a roller and shear strong enough to do 20 ga.
stainless.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

17) From: Dan Bollinger
I borrow the university's roller when I need it, which is about once every 10
years!
<Snip>
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18) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Well, Ed, once you get beyond absurdity, have a look at Harbor Freight:http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumberY07They come in 30", 40" and 52" capacities.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

19) From: Ed Needham
I've looked at that and actually tried to roll some thick stainless with
great difficulty.  I may break down and buy one, knowing that thinner
stainless would most likely work well enough.  And thinner stainless works
fine for roasting drums.  Maybe even better, since the stored heat energy in
a thinner, perfed drum is minimal.
They also have a bigger machine that would make my shop complete (for now).
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

20) From: Dan Bollinger
Perfed metal is MUCH easier to bend and roll than solid.
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

21) From: Gene Smith
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in
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now).
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Well, the little one is *supposed* to be good for 20 gauge mild steel.  I
know stainless can be cranky, but cranky and un-doable are two different
things...at least at my house, where the fun just never stops.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

22) From: peter zulkowski
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
free shipping too!!  :)
Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Gene Smith
For what it's worth, ENCO seems to have it cheaper:http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INLMK3?PMK0NO3690...but that may be evened up by the shipping charges.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>


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