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Topic: Two-bean blends for espresso (3 msgs / 118 lines)
1) From: Stephen Schurman
My tastes seem to run similar to Rafael's.  Actually, I go even lower acid.  My
current favorite is a blend of Brazil Cerrado Monte Carmelo with Monsooned
Malabar and/or Aged Sumatra Pwani.  Truth be told, I sneak in some Monsooned
Robusta too.
Steve Schurman
Whirley-Pop
Rocky
Europiccola/Santos/ChambordReply Separator
Subject:    RE: +Two-bean blends for espresso 
Author: 
Date:       2/14/01 3:40 PM
I stay away from high acidity coffees for my espresso blends. I find that
the espresso extraction process significantly enhances the acidity of the
coffee. Blends that may work for drip or French press are (to my taste) too
acid in an espresso. My basic approach is to use a low acid base, like
Brazil Cerrado Monte Carmelo, and then blend in Sumatra, or Sulawesi, or
Java. I definitely stay away from Kenyan or Ethiopian.
But, as I have always said, nothing tastes the same to everybody. Experiment
and have fun!
Regards,
Rafael

2) From: Michal Young
 
On 2/13/01,  Carl  asked:
<Snip>
A basic recipe is high acid coffee + coffee with lots of body, chosen 
so that one is not a great deal more powerful than the other.  One 
should be roasted darker than the other.  Examples:
    Maui Moka + Panama Hartmann (both light, lots of subtle flavors)
    Nicaragua La Illusion + La Minita Tarrazu (both medium-power)
    Aged Sumatra + Kenya Kiungu  (both quite powerful, but the Kenya more so)
There are lots of variations on this theme ...  Les and Becky's 
suggestion of Aged Sumatra + Uganda Bugisu, for example, has body 
from the Sumatra and acid from the Bugisu.
For some reason, despite a complete lack of singing ability, I find 
it useful to think of the coffees as voices, and to think of blending 
as harmonizing. Sumatran coffees are bass, Sulawesi or Nicaragua 
(roast fairly dark) is baritone, La Minita is tenor or possibly alto 
depending on roast, Kenya is alto to soprano again depending on 
degree of roast.  A good blend has contrasting pitches (harmony) and 
balanced volume.   Proportion can be used to balance volume to some 
extent, but there are limits.   For example, I typically don't blend 
Kiungu or Kiriko with the Nicaragua La Illusion, but I would use 
Kenya Mweiga, Uganda Bugisu, or Tanzania Peaberry (more subtle, less 
powerful variations on the Kenya profile) instead.  I likewise would 
blend Colombian Narino or Popayan (powerful coffees) with a big, 
heavy Indonesian coffee, but would choose a lighter Central American 
coffee to blend with Sulawesi Toraja.
You asked specifically about espresso.  Personally, I blend for 
espresso (which is what I drink mostly) pretty much the say I blend 
for drip.  The result is different, but the same principles seem to 
apply.
--Michal
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: cationic
I stay away from high acidity coffees for my espresso blends. I find that
the espresso extraction process significantly enhances the acidity of the
coffee. Blends that may work for drip or French press are (to my taste) too
acid in an espresso. My basic approach is to use a low acid base, like
Brazil Cerrado Monte Carmelo, and then blend in Sumatra, or Sulawesi, or
Java. I definitely stay away from Kenyan or Ethiopian.
But, as I have always said, nothing tastes the same to everybody. Experiment
and have fun!
Regards,
Rafael


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