HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Heat gun (40 msgs / 888 lines)
1) From: dennis staab
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Has anybody tried cooking a steak with a heatgun? I've had it done with =
a torch at our table before.....bet it would be good,sheering it fast so =
to keep the dripping blood from running out, crisp on the out side, rare =
on the inside.
Oh, and a real good cup of home roast.....think I'll try it!!
                                                                         =
                        Dennis

2) From: HeatGunRoast
Coffee gear is arranged at the BBQ so heatgun is handy.  And yes, I've used the
heatgun on a variety of BBQ foods.  I'm concerned about drying and toughening beef,
keeping the airflow quite low and using the gun to sizzle the exposed fat.  Mostly,
I've reached for the hg to boost a slow cook- - - it's ideal to speed along roast
veggies already moist with olive oil.  And then there's the nuts.  
--- dennis staab  wrote:
<Snip>
=====
Martin
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Finance: Get your refund fast by filing online.http://taxes.yahoo.com/filing.html

3) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
inside.
Why bother, just toss it on the Foreman! I have done quite a few this way.
Just preheat until the light goes out to sear the surface. But you must keep
flipping it every minute or so, since the juice runs to the bottom side.
Pork chops are done the same way. With both sides cooking, the total time is
low and the meat stays tender.
--

4) From: Brian Kamnetz
I finally got a heat gun:
MASTER APPLIANCE HEAT GUN HG-751B PROFESSIONAL HD TOOL Master
Appliance HG751B - 14.5 Amp 1740 Watt Heat Gun
Brand new in package!
Features and Benefits:
Industrial quality, high performance, maximum flexibility
Heavy-duty industrial-quality heat gun with temperature and power
ratings up to 1000 F (538- C) up to 1740 Watts (12OV)
The air flow rating is 23 CFM at 3,000 FPM A universal motor, die cast
aluminum housing, reinforced mica-insulated ceramic heating element
and externally replaceable carbon brushes make the Master Heat Gun a
rugged, reliable source of flameless heat
This one is a model 751 B; it seems that other Master Appliance heat
guns have been 751 A, though I may not be remembering correctly.
I went a little higher than I had planned to, $52 + $12 shipping, but
it is new, so I will not have to do any of the refurbishing with
brushes, etc., as Ray was suggesting is helpful with a used heat gun.
Brian

5) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
Hi  Brian,
Here's a small bit of advicebased on experience  and some speculation about
the physics that I'm slowly coming to figure out.
Don't be surprised if you wind up avoiding the 23 cfm in favor of something
just over half that.  I'm assuming there's an adjustment on cfm.  There's
always the temptation to do some inventing with that high cfm - - -
-something on the order of a passive fluid bed where the power of the air
agitates the beans and all you have to do is watch or snooze.  (I've given
it my best shot with a 27 cfm Porter Cable.)  No one's come up with anything
yet (IMO) that will do the half-to-3/4 lb that I find optimal for HG
roasting.  Maybe consider that a challenge.  :o)
In additon to blowing beans all over the place, I think there's some physics
involved worth considering.  In a closed environment, high air volume can
more effectively transfer heat to the beans than a lower volume.  But in an
open environment there's a kind of venturi effect that draws cooler air into
the heated air stream.  IMO, not much if any greater heat transfer takes
place in trade for the extra blowing and noise.  Further, at some point
after second c. when the beans become exothermic, the high cfm can actually
slow the roast.
All FWIW
Martin
On 6/24/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

6) From: Brian Kamnetz
Hi Martin,
Thanks for the tips. I will probably be experimenting in a few weeks
when I visit a buddy in Madison. I turned him on to roasting last
summer. He's enjoying roasting and especially the results, but he's
becoming frustrated with the quantity limitations of the popper. It
will be relativly easy to pack the new heat gun and some greens, and
experimenting with HG/DB techniques will be a nice compliment to
sampling the several varieties of home brews he tells me he will have
on hand.
Am I understanding you correctly regarding mass, that you have found
1/2 to 3/4 pound to be optimal for HG/DB results?
Brian
On 6/25/06, Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
 wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: an iconoclast
On 6/25/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
Unless you add bottom heat. I regularly do 2 lbs with my BBQ side
burner on high and HG hanging off the side of the BBQ hood.  I adjust
the HG down as needed once things are a' crackin. With 2 lbs of greens
the bean mass generates it's own heat after a certain point and I can
just get it to coast to the desired roast.
Good luck,
Ann

8) From: Brian Kamnetz
That's right, Ann, I recall you saying that - I'd completely
forgotten. I'm pretty sure my buddy in Madison replaced his gas grill,
wouldn't doubt at all that he has a side burner. He's talking TO/SC
(in fact, I'm giving him my SC), but I'm wondering if he might not
decide to do DB/HG, except for maybe in the winter, though winters in
Madison have been quite mild for the last 10 years or so, it seems...
Brian
On 6/25/06, an iconoclast  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: raymanowen
My BBQ is nearly ready to cook, with whatever it is they call Propane
nowadays.
I assume the formulation has lower heat content so you have to buy it in
greater quantities. I'll get more excited when I can acquire a low priced
(LP) forktruck gas bottle.
Anything has to be cheaper than the grocery store Brand X stuff. That's
probably the Most expensive way to buy it.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
On 6/25/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Peter Zulkowski
Congratulations Brian! :)
Why am I thinking this would be a great engine for a hot air poppery 
type roaster?
PeterZ
Still loving to tinker....
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Brian Kamnetz
I'm thinking of getting a heat gun for a buddy who is interested in
HG/DB roasting. My own heat guy is rated for temps around 1100. Is
that necessary? For example, would a HG with the following specs work
ok?
Dayton  Model 2Z387B with extra heat element.
Nozzle............................................300-500 Deg. F
Electrical Requirements...................115 VAC. 60 Hz. 10 amps
Air Delivery
     Velocity ( approx.)...................3000 FPM
     Volume ( approx.).......................35 CFM
It doesn't say how many amps it pulls, but I am wondering about that
too. My heat gun is rated 4.5 amps; what does that mean exactly? I'm
wondering if it may reflect a difference between heat guns in the BTUs
produced. For example, two heat guns may produce 500 degrees at the
nozzle, but one that is drawing more amps may be putting out more
heat.... Am I anywhere near correct on this?
Thanks for any help.
Brian

12) From: Vicki Smith
It may not be necessary, but I know that it takes me about 8-9 minutes 
to reach first crack in my HG/bread machine roaster with a heat gun that 
works at 1100 degrees and 12 ounces of greens. I go into the lower level 
when first crack really gets going, and then shoot it back up to the 
high level for a minute or so if I am going for a FC+ or greater.
I don't think I would want to prolong the time to 1st crack any longer 
than this. I suspect a lower temperature heat gun would do that.
My HG is a cheapo, btw. Under $35 CAD at a local discount chain.
vicki
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 10/10/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
That's sort of what I was wondering about, Vicki. I think I would be
wise to hold out for a higher temp rating.
Brian

14) From: raymanowen
W. W. Grainger is headquartered in Chi-town, with branches all over the
place.
The description you gave, "with extra heat element," (never supplied that
way)
is eBay palaver for It Doesn't Work.
If you can buy it right (Under $50, abused as it has been), they're easy to
fix up, and it would be worth getting, in my opinion.
Ask The Seller if the red case has any cracks. If so, it's still repairable
but I wouldn't pay over $25.00. The Imbeciles use these things as Hammers.
Thet're not good hammers, and suddenly they're not good heat guns either.
Take a look at the Grainger catalog page:
  [image: Compare
Items] [image:
Add to Order]
[image:
add items to personal
list] [image:
Clear] 
 Sort Table By: Default Item# Manufacturer Usually Ships Catalog Page
Item # Qty. Notes Description Brand
Mfr. Model # Ship
Qty. Usually   
Ships**
Your
Price Catalog
397 Page
4Z714
Parts
Info
   
 Heat Gun, Current @ 120 VAC 12.0 Amps, Air Velocity 3000 FPM, Air Volume 23
CFM, Temperature Range 300-500 Degrees Fahrenheit, 120 Volts  MASTER
APPLIANCE 
HG-301A  1  Today
 $117.60  3408 
4Z715
Parts
Info
   
 Heat Gun, Current @ 120 VAC 14.0 Amps, Air Velocity 3000 FPM, Air Volume 23
CFM, Temperature Range 500-750 Degrees Fahrenheit, 120 Volts  MASTER
APPLIANCE 
HG-501A  1  Today
 $105.30  3408 
   Results Displayed: 1 - 2 of 2
 *Page 1* of 1
 *You searched* > 2Z387B
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

15) From: Justin Marquez
On 10/10/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
I would think 500 deg output would be minimal.  I think most of the
heat guns will do 700 deg to 900 deg.
I have a 1000 watt el cheapo Wagner ($29.95) and I normally run it
full tilt and when I think the beans need less heat (i.e., during
first crack and to "hold" between 1st and 2nd cracks), I just pull the
gun back out of the bowl a little.
My "standard" batch size is 1.5 cup measure, which is about 240 grams
of green beans, or about 8 or 9 ounces.  The whole roast usually takes
about 10-11 minutes to a FC level.
I'll usually see yellow-tan in about 3-4 minutes, first crack starts
at about 6-7 min., I pull the nozzle back then and first crack
finishes at about 8-9 minutes, I pull the nozzle back a bit more and
"coast" for a minute of so. If I am targetting City +, I quit right
there; if I am going for FC or FC+, then I go back down with the
nozzle and stir like crazy until I hear as many second snaps as I am
shooting for.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

16) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 10/10/06, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
I'm thinking more and more that the total BTUs produced by a heat gun
is probably indicated by the amps used. For example, my Master
Appliance HG-751b Heat Gun is rated at 14.5 amps and 1100 degrees, and
I have no problem roasting a full pound at the progression (including
time) that you describe for half a pound.
Brian

17) From: Justin Marquez
On 10/11/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
The total BTU's is exactly dependent on the wattage (normally about
equal to the amps x the volts).  The suitability for roasting depends
on both the wattage AND the air temp produced.  You can use a 1200
watt hair dryer all day long and never get to first crack.
AT 14.5 amp and 110 volts, your heat gun runs close to 1600 watts,
mine is 1000 watts or so. Thus, with 1100 degrees and 1600 watts, I
can believe that you could roast a pound in about the same time as I
do a half pound.
I am sure that a lot, maybe even most, of the heat output doesn't get
to the beans since the air deflects off the face of the bean mass.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

18) From: Brian Kamnetz
You may be right, Justin. Now that I think of it, I roasted 1# roasts
while on my travels last summer, when I didn't have a timer, and in
addition was roasting with other people around, when I am used to
roasting solo. So it may have taken longer than I was thinking it had
to roast a pound. I use only half a pound of coffee a week and so,
since I have been back, I roast half a pound at a time, at a rate
pretty close to the profile you describe with half a pound. It would
be interesting to roast a pound sometime when I have my timer handy,
just to see how long it takes.
brian
On 10/11/06, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: Brian Kamnetz
Justin,
Incidentally, thanks for the clear description of the relationship
between BTUs vs. watts, amps, and volts. I'm not saying that I all of
a suddent "get" electricity, but it started to make sense there for a
while!
Brian
On 10/11/06, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Brian Kamnetz
I said that "I use only half a pound of coffee a week and so, since I
have been back, I roast half a pound at a time, at a rate > pretty
close to the profile you describe with half a pound". I should add
that that I manipulate the heat gun to hit that profile; it doesn't
represent (I don't think it does, anyway) my maximum rate. But it is
interesting to think of heat guns in terms of the formula for BTUs
that Justin provided.
Brian

21) From: Justin Marquez
On 10/11/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
I actually did a 1# roast once with my el-cheapo HG and it took about
2x as long as a 1/2# roast or about 20+ minutes.  I was concerned that
I was on the cusp of baking it instead of roasting it AND my ancient
left shoulder did not much like my holding and waving the HG for that
long at a stretch. Plus, it was exceedingly boring.
Since I could actually roast two 1/2# batches in not much longer time
than 1# roast, I decided that to get bigger roasts, I'd just get the
RK drum. (Hey.. I was LOOKING for an excuse, if ye take me meanin'...)
 A better heat gun would probably have done better as well. BUT.. I
already had a HG, but I didn't already had an RK Drum!  :-)
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

22) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
I have the same Wagner Heat Gun and I can't do a 1# roast with it even
though the heat is there, there is not enough blower power to roast a #
I tried it in 85degs and stalled the roast(ended up taking over 30 min
to get to C+) So I stick to 1/2# roasts!...
Dennis
Heading toward Gibraltar,
,
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS-5 DSPO
CS Dept CC
CS Dept TRANO
Duty Sec 1 CS E6 S/L
CS Dept Mentorship Coordinator
DCTT Repair locker 1F
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it..."

23) From: Brian Kamnetz
<Snip>
I can relate to the ancient shoulder/arm/wrist/hand. My 14.5 amp
Master Appliance heat gun is HEAVY! I've gotta figure out a way to
dangle it from the ceiling of my screen porch, sort of like Ann
dangles hers from the cover of her gas grill.
Brian

24) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
Of course, "heavy" is in the arm of the be-holder, but I find my Makita 1100
is relatively light and maybe as important, quiet with little vibration.
The grip lets the HG rest easy in my hand.  It's pricey at just over $70 but
a quality instrument that got heavy use for 6 yrs before 4 yrs using it for
coffee and nuts.  The OP on this thread said he was buying for a friend, and
that raises two questions:  How good of a friend?  How much money ya got?
I've tried a few HGs and I have 3 general rules: 1) high temp (1k or 1100)
at mid cfm gives the most control---the most options; 2) Bargains are good,
but some el-cheapos are not as nice to hold as most better HGs; and, of
course, 3) heat + beans = roast.
Martin
On 10/11/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

25) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 10/11/06, Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
 wrote:
<Snip>
Good points, all, Martin. I've cast covetous eyes toward those Makita
1100 heat guns... He's a pretty good friend. He and his family are
good to me. I actually got him started roasting, gave him an 8#
sampler a while back to mark one of his accomplishments... in the big
picture, budget is somewhat arbitrary. If I can afford $40 or $45, I
can probably afford $70. Maybe that's the way to go. (Or, I could give
him my heavy Master Appliance heat gun and get myself a Makita... win
win! Hmmmm...)
Brian

26) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
That last option seems the best.  You don't want to burden a friend with a
machine that you haven't thoroughly vetted.  Always time to correct regrets
Martin
On 10/11/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

27) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 10/11/06, Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
 wrote:
<Snip>
Martin, I like the way you think!!!
Brian

28) From: Julie H Tieszen
What kinds of heat guns do people use? Is there a certain 'wattage' I need 
to get, better brands, sizes,etc? I'm clueless. There aren't any on the SM's 
site, are there?
Is it basically just a mega hairdryer? :)
Thanks,
Julie

29) From: Bob
Julie,
I have a "cheap" Milwaukee gun from Home Depot that ran me $30. 
It has a high/low setting with high being 1200ºF . That will 
blister skin in a few seconds, but does wonders to the beans in 
my breadmachine.
Bob

30) From: Vicki Smith
I also have a cheapo heat gun, with two speeds. One advantage of the 
cheaper model I have, over the more expensive models I looked at, is 
that the cheaper HG weighed less. I have no doubt that there are light 
weight expensive ones, but I didn't see any when I was buying my HG. Big 
roasts take a fair amount of heat gun action, and the lighter gun helps.
I start out at the higher setting, and run that way until first crack 
really gets going. Then I switch to the lower setting, bringing it back 
to high if and when I want to bring on 2nd crack.
The other variable is the distance between the beans and the tip of the 
heat gun. One advantage of holding the heat gun--rather than fixing it 
in place with a hairdryer stand or a vertical chicken roaster--is that 
you can adjust the distance between the beans and the gun on the fly. As 
my bread pan fills up (remember bean expansion)< I need to change the 
position of the heat gun, which is much easier to do if the heat gun is 
hand held.
The other advantage of the cheaper HG is that when it finally breaks 
(perhaps after dropping it on the concrete garage floor for the 10th 
time), you can replace it without tears. My cheapo is still going strong 
after about 35 roasts and three oopsies onto the floor.
vicki
Bob wrote:
<Snip>

31) From: Justin Marquez
On 12/20/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
My $30 Wagner is still going strong after 18 months usage,  with 2 to
3 roasts per week and a couple of "oops!" as well.
p.s. - If you drop it, DON'T try to catch it!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

32) From: Vicki Smith
Definitely don't try to catch it--ouch. I use that vertical chicken 
roaster (like for making beer can chicken) as a receptacle for the heat 
gun. I never knew exactly where/how to put it down as I was moving the 
bread machine pan to dump it into my cooling basket. The chicken roaster 
holds it in a stable way, without risk of catching something on fire, as 
I do that.
I thought about using the chicken roaster to hold the gun during the 
roasting only because it was by my bread machine awaiting its use as a 
holder for the hot heat gun. As I said, I prefer waving the heat gun 
around manually, but its worth trying, if only to be able to say that 
you use the bread-machine-heat-gun-chicken-roaster method.
Talk about Dog Patch Roasting...
vicki
Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>

33) From: Brian Kamnetz
I use a Master Appliance HG-751B. It's heavy, nearly 4 pounds, but it really
cranks out the BTUs. I can roast a pound at a time, start first crack 8-9
mins, hit the outliers of second crack at about 14 mins. I usually roast
only half a pound at a time, but it's fun to be able to roast more if I want
to.
Brian
On 12/20/06, Julie H Tieszen  wrote:
<Snip>

34) From: James
Just make sure it is of recent vintage. Some of the older model heat guns u=
sed asbestos as insulating material. I would not want asbestos fibers blast=
ed into my coffee beans!
  
James in Southern CA
On 12/20/06, J=
ulie H Tieszen  wrote:
What kinds of heat guns do pe=
ople use? Is there a certain 'wattage' I need
to get, better brands, size=
s,etc? I'm clueless. There aren't any on the SM's
site, are there?
=
Is it basically just a mega hairdryer? :)
Thanks,
Julie
_=
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=http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your=
 personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to htt=
p://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
=
Do You Yahoo!=
?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
http=
://mail.yahoo.com 

35) From: Robert Bedwell
Hank........I noticed in one of your Quest posts that you use a heat gun.  I can now see that one would be very helpful but can't find one locally except the barebones models.  Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Bob
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36) From: Hank Perkins
Ebay, MCM, Allied are all  good choices.  I got mine from Allied but I
do a ton of business with them.  Just do a search.
On Mon, Mar 14, 2011 at 7:14 PM, Robert Bedwell  wrote:
<Snip>
  I can now see that one would be very helpful but can't find one locally=
 except the barebones models.  Any suggestions?
<Snip>
mariascoffee.com
<Snip>
ee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
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37) From: raymanowen
"...can't find one locally except the barebones models."
The barebones models generate heat. You wanted what- the problems endemic to
the more complex expensive models?
For $10.00, you get heat, blue fire, smoke and sparks from the Glorious
People's orange jobs-
For $20.00, I've gotten several years' service, lotsa' heat and Nil Per Mano
problems from my Wagner HT-1000.
Still made in the same country where they speak Chinese, but it works good.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
Persist in old ways; expect new results - suborn Insanity...
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38) From: Hank Perkins
You do need one with a reducer tip that will allow you to force the
heat down the tryer hole.  Also I stay below 700 degrees max using it
with the quest (mine is adjustable, I am on the road and don't have it
here.  I can't remember the brand).  I don't think it is needed if
your max load is 225g or maybe even 250g  Get above 270g and it is
definitely required.  Or I guess you could roast in 100 degrees
ambient.
On Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 1:59 AM,   wrote:
<Snip>
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39) From: Robert Bedwell
Thank you Hank....
I consistently stick to 227gm loads.  I do better when there are fewer variables to deal with.  The ambient temperatures have been so erratic here in NC 
during the past several months and the Quest does react to temperature changes.  Combine this with the probe sensor problem I experienced last
week and it was a challenge.  It may be a waste of money to guy a heat gun with the temperature increasing at this time of the year.
The heat gun that I like is the Master Appliance PH1400K.  It has variable fan and variable temperature in 10 degree increments which I think
would make it easier to control.  Of course it's an overkill.  I think it makes sense to see how it goes with the warmer weather and the probe
replacement before investing in a heat gun.  
Thanks for your input.
Bob
On Mar 15, 2011, at 5:47 AM, Hank Perkins wrote:
<Snip>
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40) From: Hank Perkins
Bob,
I think that's what I have.  You can make sure your beans are at least
72 degrees before you charge the roaster.  This should help and will
eliminate one of your variables.
Hank
On Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 5:09 AM, Robert Bedwell  wrote:
<Snip>
variables to deal with.  The ambient temperatures have been so erratic he=
re in NC
<Snip>
anges.  Combine this with the probe sensor problem I experienced last
<Snip>
gun with the temperature increasing at this time of the year.
<Snip>
ble fan and variable temperature in 10 degree increments which I think
<Snip>
k it makes sense to see how it goes with the warmer weather and the probe
<Snip>
ic to
<Snip>
 Mano
<Snip>
ood.
<Snip>
etmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
ffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
tmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
fee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
mariascoffee.com
<Snip>
ee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
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