HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 'resting coffee' (5 msgs / 140 lines)
1) From: Ted
<Snip>
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
Rick,
no way. 
what can I say, is it my imagination?
my last roast was barely there the first day, like tea really, when I ground
up the warm beans..
The next day was better, but not that great.
The third day; there's the depth and tastes Tom was talking about..
Certainly some beans are more affected by rest than others, but I'd say
generally speaking almost all coffee tastes more like it's described a
couple days after roasting..
Though, now it occurs to me; how long do they rest the beans at those
cupping conventions?
--Ted
-----
Rick wrote:
Personally I wouldn't worry all that much about this resting business right
now.  The differences in anything that reasonable people can argu...debate
to the extent we discuss resting, must be very small.  

2) From: Tom Ulmer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
'resting coffee'My household runs through about 60 oz. of  beans per week.
In order to keep up with that demand (and keep roasting as an ejoyable
pastime) I have had to experiment with different beans and roasts to: (a)
make sure there is supply and (b) keep it tasting good for the full week. I
roast just once a week.
The first time the three day thing hit me I was crushed thinking I was going
to have to drink this for the rest of the week.
Unfortunately I am a cook (and not a baker) at heart and I am always
changing the mix, however there is no better reward for my efforts than
nailing a roast that works for each day of the week.
 From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin]On Behalf Of Ted
Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2004 6:26 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +'resting coffee'
  Rick,
    no way.
    what can I say, is it my imagination?
    my last roast was barely there the first day, like tea really, when I
ground up the warm beans..
    The next day was better, but not that great.
    The third day; there's the depth and tastes Tom was talking about..
    Certainly some beans are more affected by rest than others, but I'd say
generally speaking almost all coffee tastes more like it's described a
couple days after roasting..
    Though, now it occurs to me; how long do they rest the beans at those
cupping conventions?
    --Ted
    -----
  
  Rick wrote:
  Personally I wouldn't worry all that much about this resting business
right now.  The differences in anything that reasonable people can
argu...debate to the extent we discuss resting, must be very small.

3) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Ted  wrote:
<Snip>
 I've done many a roast that was weak, thin and tea-like when
brewed fresh from the roaster, but got better after a couple of
days rest. They're my "screwed up" roasts, going for a
pre-second crack city roast, with a failed profile that didn't
let them develope enough. They never get "great", after resting,
just drinkable, pretty good maybe. 
<Snip>
 Some beans do definately peak after a couple or three days, but
those are usually very very good right away, too. Some, like
Yirg, fade to tea-like after just a few days rest.
 What kind of roaser you use, and how you use it (profiling),
does seem to matter.
 I don't think the cupping convention coffee gets any rest.
Anyone know for sure? (Tom??)
  Charlie
<Snip>
=====
Brick Oven Roasting in British Columbia
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Search - Find what you’re looking for fasterhttp://search.yahoo.com

4) From: Ron Kyle
Charlie asked this:
<Snip>
Not Tom, but when we were in Raleigh for the SCAA Cmembers even, we were
told 8 hrs. rest.
RK

5) From: Ted
<Snip>
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
Charlie,
                       interesting observation. you may have a good point
there. it's true, at first I was hesitant to go further out into the darker
roasts, heeding Tom's advice to stay close to the tastes of home, of  the
'origins' -- lately I've begun to notice what you mention, venturing a
little further into the 'darkness' often brings great rewards ;>)
                      I have found lately with large batches in the HotTop
(300 grams) I can go 'a few snaps into second' easily, without fear of a
charred taste, as the large load seems to slow the process second
cracking...with better immediate results. With smaller loads, the HotTop
would race into 2nd, and getting the 'perfect roast' was a matter of a few
seconds, with the larger loads, there's more time..
--Ted
                   
From: Oaxaca Charlie 
Reply-To: homeroast
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 2004 17:09:35 -0800 (PST)
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +'resting coffee'
-
I've done many a roast that was weak, thin and tea-like when
brewed fresh from the roaster, but got better after a couple of
days rest. They're my "screwed up" roasts, going for a
pre-second crack city roast, with a failed profile that didn't
let them develope enough. They never get "great", after resting,
just drinkable, pretty good maybe.


HomeRoast Digest