HomeRoast Digest


Topic: [coffee] +'resting coffee' (3 msgs / 96 lines)
1) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Whoops, I wasn't clear in what I was trying to communicate.  My point
was that whether you rest your coffee in a vacuum, in a freezer, in a
mason jar, or in a old dirty sock, the differences are going to be
2nd-order effects, at best.  I never meant to infer that resting was
unimportant, only the method.
 
Alfred is still at the point where he needs to figure out how darkly he
likes his coffee roasted, and which origins he likes.
 
Personally I like coffee when it comes out of the roaster, but a few
hours later it enters a sulk and is almost undrinkable, then finally it
emerges in all its glory after the appropriate rest.
 
Consider also that lasagne always tastes better the second day, but that
doesn't stop me from eating it the first day.
 
As to cupping, that reminds me of a story my
brother-the-volunteer-fireman told me.  He said he was on overnight
watch over a fire that had been put out, and in the morning a fire
investigator showed up.  As soon as the investigator got to the scene,
he immediately exclaimed it was probably arson.  My brother asked why,
and the investigator said that the ruins reeked of gasoline.
 
My brother has a pretty good nose and he didn't smell any gasoline, and
so told the investigator.  The investigator said that was because my
brother was trying to smell *unburned* gasoline.
 
I suspect cuppers are the same way -- they are tasting for unrested
tastes that they know will change into something else when the coffee
rests.
 
-- Rick

2) From: Brian Hyde
Certainly, although knowing the smell of burnt gasoline is certainly 
impressive.  Hmmm.. smells like New York...
But yes, as a homebrewer I realize at any time during the process if I 
am on the right track.  Anywhere from the kettle through fermentation 
and after years in the bottle.  I think though in a coffee or a beer you 
are looking for flaws, not necessarily the exact character.  Although 
you can certainly guess at the character with some experience.  After 
you have roasted the Horse 10 times and tried it as it aged each time 
you get an idea where the roast might be going.  The color of the bean 
is certainly a great indicator, but it's not a fine enough gauge.  
And yes what is with the funk it makes for the first 12 hours?  I agree 
it isn't too bad immediately after the roast, but it goes through a 
strange spell as it matures.  What's with that?
Well cheers to the journey of figuring it all out.  I feel a bit like it 
is a drink of life sometimes, because I know I am never going to figure 
it all out!
Brian
Rick Farris wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: peter zulkowski
Folgers rests for days, weeks, months sometimes, in it's little can with 
the plastic pop on lid. It ALWAYS tastes the same.
How do they do that? Do the inferior coffees never get any better, or worse?
PeterZ
Weather is cooler today, here in LHC.
Brian Hyde wrote:
<Snip>


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