HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Turbo/Crazy (14 msgs / 331 lines)
1) From: Sue Stevenson
Hi, What can I say but WOW. The Turbo/Crazy sounds interesting! I think I'll practice a bit more with my FreshRoast while I think about how to upgrade. I did print off those instructions though. Maybe I'll give it a try when I have a weekend to experiment with. I'll need to figure out what a Turbo Air Oven is first. 
 
And yes, your right, this is an obsession! Now I find myself looking at grinders and brewing methods as well. I told my husband this would be good hobby - we would even save money roasting our own beans!!! It's a good thing he likes coffee! Sue

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
I just love posts like that. All too often it's seen as just us guys going
off the deep end! (forwarded to Debi's email:-)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

3) From: peter zulkowski
Funny, I told my wife the same thing. And we are saving money on beans, 
it is just the cost per cup is kind of high right now ;)
PeterZ
Going to try roasting under a very large fresnel lense, here in LHC.
Sue Stevenson wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Johnny Kent
me too. 
Johnny (forwarding to April...)
At 09:59 PM 3/11/2004 -0800, you wrote:
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

5) From: Johnny Kent
I write half off to "recreation:hobbies"  and the other half to "Food" for
each batch of coffee that I buy since a lot gets ruined with my experiments
;-) 
We still come out way ahead since the better roasting results are so much
better than what I have been able to buy locally. 
Yeah, I know, the hobby costs some for all that equipment. But hey almost
anything you try can cost as much. Try mountain biking, skiing, water
sports, sky diving, etc. Roasting coffee is cheaper and safer. Definitely
tastier :)
At 11:01 PM 3/11/2004 -0700, you wrote:
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

6) From: Ryuji Suzuki
Incidentally, my current coffee roasting setup is like this:http://www.silvergrain.org/gallery/categories.php?cat_idI got rid of Stir Crazy. I just grab the pan every minute or every
other minutes (depending on how much I roast) and manually
stir. That's enough. The pan is Calphalon 12" pan with two handles.
I often do melange and it's very easy to do with this setup. Take a
portion of the roasted coffee at the lighter target (say city+) with a
metal scoop and cool it down at once, while the pan continues to roast
the rest until the darker target (say full city) is reached. Then halt
the roast, cool, and blend. There is no moving parts, making scooping
a lot easier. (YOu can even lift and tilt the pan to take half the
bean out.)  Well, if you feel lazy, if you don't stir too much and
you're all set for melange. You'll get continuous grading of roasts
instead of blend of two distinct roasts, but besides the appearance, I
have no objection in the latter result. (But it's important to make
sure not too many beans are too light or too dark. They can ruin the
cup. You can always give good agitation until lighter target is
reached, and then slack.)
I use stove on high flame at the beginning of the roast, then turn
down to medium flame. If the batch size is large (1/2 lb or greater)
and if I go far into second crack, I turn up to high flame at the end
of roast also. Yemen Ismaili also seems to like high flame at the end
of roasting.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)

7) From: Ryuji Suzuki
Incidentally, my current coffee roasting setup is like this:http://www.silvergrain.org/gallery/categories.php?cat_idI got rid of Stir Crazy. I just grab the pan every minute or every
other minutes (depending on how much I roast) and manually
stir. That's enough. The pan is Calphalon 12" pan with two handles.
I often do melange and it's very easy to do with this setup. Take a
portion of the roasted coffee at the lighter target (say city+) with a
metal scoop and cool it down at once, while the pan continues to roast
the rest until the darker target (say full city) is reached. Then halt
the roast, cool, and blend. There is no moving parts, making scooping
a lot easier. (YOu can even lift and tilt the pan to take half the
bean out.)  Well, if you feel lazy, if you don't stir too much and
you're all set for melange. You'll get continuous grading of roasts
instead of blend of two distinct roasts, but besides the appearance, I
have no objection in the latter result. (But it's important to make
sure not too many beans are too light or too dark. They can ruin the
cup. You can always give good agitation until lighter target is
reached, and then slack.)
I use stove on high flame at the beginning of the roast, then turn
down to medium flame. If the batch size is large (1/2 lb or greater)
and if I go far into second crack, I turn up to high flame at the end
of roast also. Yemen Ismaili also seems to like high flame at the end
of roasting.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)

8) From: Peter Bishop
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
The Turbo/Crazy combination is my main method at the moment, and I'm happy with the quality & amount I can do in a single session.  I usually roast one pound at a time, and the process takes in the region of 14mins.  I've made a few modifications to the Stir Crazy (the Decosonic Turbo top is original).  There were a number of long discussions over on Coffeegeek that were sparked off when a member took the original suggestion from here and shared it with the group.  There were a whole bunch of suggestions to improve the operation of the Stir Crazy, and a lot of people gave it a go (usually with a high degree of success).  Out of the box, the SC is a little fragile and needs a little help to survive the stress of roasting coffee.
The central nut that holds the wire will melt unless changed and/or protected.  I replaced mine with a metal nut and washer and covered the whole thing with a copper pipe cap (cutouts for the stirring wires).  I've had no problem with the threaded shaft to this point.
I added small rollers to the wires... this lifts them slightly and provides better bean movement.
I made an aluminum collar for the whole thing.  I was unhappy about the way the turbo top sat on the SC.  I just formed a one-inch aluminum strip into a circle that sits snugly into the SC base.  The provides a more solid construction for the mating and a nice place to mount a thermometer (drill a small hole through the collar).  Chaff isn't blown out throughout the roasting process, only when the top is lifted.
I have left the SC heater connected, but am considering disconnecting it to see what the effect is on the overall roast time.  One of the things I like about this method is that it's very easy to monitor the roast.  The cracks are easily heard and it's easy to look with a quick lift of the lid.  The top of the turbo oven may be transparent, but after a few uses it gets pretty oily :)  I stick to one pound, but others have pushed it well beyond this with getting roast that are too uneven.
Cheers
peter

9) From: John Abbott
HI RYUJI!  Good to see you posting again. 
Your wok looks a lot more shallow that the one I've been using. Almost a
frying pan.  Your finished product looks good though - so maybe I should
be looking for a Calphalon Wok?   Does the turbo top filter the smoke?
John
On Fri, 2004-03-12 at 02:05, Ryuji Suzuki wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Lesley Albjerg
Welcome back Ryuji,  I have missed your insights.
 
Les
John Abbott  wrote:
HI RYUJI! Good to see you posting again. 
Your wok looks a lot more shallow that the one I've been using. Almost a
frying pan. Your finished product looks good though - so maybe I should
be looking for a Calphalon Wok? Does the turbo top filter the smoke?
John
On Fri, 2004-03-12 at 02:05, Ryuji Suzuki wrote:
<Snip>---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Search - Find what you’re looking for faster.

11) From: Tom Ulmer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
watch out...  my wife would probably leave me now if i quit this "hobby"

12) From: Ryuji Suzuki
From: "Tom Ulmer" 
Subject: +RE: Turbo/Crazy
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2004 10:56:05 -0500
<Snip>
If I roast more than you do, do I get her?
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)

13) From: Ryuji Suzuki
From: John Abbott 
Subject: Re: +Re: Turbo/Crazy
Date: 12 Mar 2004 08:50:16 -0600
<Snip>
Yeah mine is shallow, so I have to agitate beans in random linear
motion as well as circular motion, all in the horizontal plane. With
too much vertical motion and the bean jumps into the turbo fan blades
to make offensive noise.
Smoke and some chaffs come right out. I'd roast under hood that goes
to outside, at the very least. I have a vacuum cleaner handy so that I
can clean up most of the chaffs before they spread all over.
I think the bottom heat is very useful, because it allows quick
initial heating of the bean, and you can finish roasting as fast as
hot air roasting if you want. With beans like Yemen I find the extra
kick from bottom heat at the end of roast (I usually go barely into
second crack) really helpful, though many other beans I don't really
need extra kick. On the other hand, using the same setup, I can spend
20 minutes for full city if I want.  Also, bottom heat makes roasting
more even especially when batch size is large.
I think I was lucky at my first try, but Turbo Oven makes pronounced
circular hot spots if the distance is too far or too close. Those who
have this problem with Turbo Oven might want to adjust the
distance. Also, I'm not sure if the glass bowl the oven comes with is
an ideal vessel to use for roasting, especially in winter and
outside... heat escapes too quickly.
Deeper pan might be useful if you frequently roast 1lb batches (or
more) at a time. I'd expect you'll have to agitate bean more
frequently for even roast, but that's still easier than two small
batches. My deeper pans are non-stick coated, so I'm reluctant to test
with them.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)

14) From: Tom Ulmer
i'll ask


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