HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee Evangelism (27 msgs / 699 lines)
1) From: John Abbott
I've been a home roaster since we moved here to Mission.  I have
converted a couple of folks to home roasting - only to have them move
back north.  Then we moved to 'A' street and our new place and
everything changed.  A is a much more social group and we have visitors
daily who drop by for a cup. One couple (retired minister and a retired
teacher) had begun asking me questions about the technique for
roasting.  I gave them one of my FR+ roasters to experiment with and
they got hooked.  They've joined this list and are beginning the
journey.  Then Yesterday I was asked if I would put on a demonstration
of home roasting as a park activity next Saturday - no problem - love
to.  Tonight I got a call from a neighboring park and they too would
like to have a demonstration and talk on home roasting.  It took time
but I think home roasting is about to take hold here in the tip of
Texas!
So now my question to the list:  What are the things that I really want
to promote that will entice them to at least attempt it?  These are
seniors and have more time than money or sense - what roaster should I
point them toward?
I have already collected many of Tom's pages and printed them as hand
outs. What am I leaving out?
John - Wandering Deep Southern Texas

2) From: Ted
Hey John,
what a coincidence! The Amerigas guy was just here yesterday connecting my
new house to the gas line, and he noticed my HotTop and roasting
supplies...he asked if coffee homeroasting was worth it...a few minutes
later he was sipping a cup of 22 de Septiembre,  while I climbed up into the
shed attic to retrieve one of my two retired Freshroasters. which he bought
for $30...and I even threw in a half a sack of Ugandan Nanja for him to
practice on.. he thought the Septiembre was "mild" -- so I suggested mixing
some of the Nanja in with it... hope he likes it...
I also recommended he read the SweetMaria site, especially the tip sheets on
the Freshroasters.
Something in the air?
--Ted
-------------
John Abbott homeroast
Sat Mar 13 19:35:03 2004
*    Previous message: +dog ears rotisserie glasses cromullance?
------------------------------------------------------------------------
I've been a home roaster since we moved here to Mission.  I have
converted a couple of folks to home roasting - only to have them move
back north.  Then we moved to 'A' street and our new place and
everything changed.  A is a much more social group and we have visitors
daily who drop by for a cup. One couple (retired minister and a retired
teacher) had begun asking me questions about the technique for
roasting.  I gave them one of my FR+ roasters to experiment with and
they got hooked.  They've joined this list and are beginning the
journey.  Then Yesterday I was asked if I would put on a demonstration
of home roasting as a park activity next Saturday - no problem - love
to.  Tonight I got a call from a neighboring park and they too would
like to have a demonstration and talk on home roasting.  It took time
but I think home roasting is about to take hold here in the tip of
Texas!
So now my question to the list:  What are the things that I really want
to promote that will entice them to at least attempt it?  These are
seniors and have more time than money or sense - what roaster should I
point them toward?
I have already collected many of Tom's pages and printed them as hand
outs. What am I leaving out?
John - Wandering Deep Southern Texas

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
Hmmm, John's Wandering CSA Workshop Circuit! Tough question replies
below....

4) From: Jared Andersson
I am more worried about giving new roasters too much information.  At least half of my joy in home roasting has been learning about it on my own.  My childhood forts were always more fun to build than to inhabit.  Jared
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail - More reliable, more storage, less spam

5) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
least half of my joy in home roasting has been learning about it on my own.
My childhood forts were always more fun to build than to inhabit.  Jared
Jared makes an excellent point.  Too much information is often the worst
weapon of the proselytizer.  If you're going to be there in person, I can't
imagine anything more convincing than a taste of decent coffee...and if they
can't taste the difference, then homeroasting would be silly.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

6) From: John Abbott
Yeah and I tend to give way too many details about anything.  My kids
used to approach me with a question and say "Dad, short answer, how do
you turn this on?"    I'm not going to attempt to make them master
roasters, but I want to make the hobby appealing enough that they will
look in to it further.
I plan on talking about the variety of beans, and the variety of
roasts.  The importance of a good grinder and the various preparation
methods.   I plan to demonstrate a couple of roasters, and a couple of
brew methods.  The multiple brew method is to get a drink into everyones
hand quickly.
I've printed out a couple of Tom's cupping reports to illustrate the
flavors available in fresh coffee that they have never experienced.   I
have Sweet Marias URL on my first and last slide (Open Office Impress). 
I've grabbed some photos from around the world of coffee plantations and
farms. And have a discussion on the plight of the coffee farmer world
wide - but especially in Central America.
Anything else you'd throw in the bag?  I have the floor for 45 minutes -
and don't want to flood or bore them. 
John
On Sat, 2004-03-13 at 23:09, Jared Andersson wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Ky Azlein
John,
Tom & Maria would, undoubtedly, be the best advisors on which roaster to
point to for seniors who might want to enter the roasting world.  I am 55 &
have  poor high frequency hearing (for beeps & pops).....that probably comes
somewhat close to your potential students?  Also, I've done lots of
teaching/training to both youngsters and adults.  Anyway, I've had 2
Siroccos, a HR Precision, a HotTop, and the new FR+8.  I'd certainly point
to the FR as a good option for a starter roaster, given your student
population.  Postives: mechanical timer with no hard-to-see LED/no
hard-to-hear beeps (like the HotTop), no costly filters to replace (and the
chaff collector seems bulletproof and simple to empty), pops are audible
over the sound of the roaster (better than some), smoke is minimal (of
course, so is quantity), degree of roast is visible easily from all sides,
roast is quick (don't need alot of patience), cost is minimal for a
mechanical roaster, hot parts are few (safety), machine cleanup is minimal,
and size/weight is quite manageable.  Even demonstration in the class is
facilitated by the 360 degree glass chamber and quiet fan motor. You can
discuss what's occuring in the roast while it happens....not so with a
popper, HotTop (can't have a circle of students see the window), BBQ, or
even glass chambered roasters with more noise.   My 2 cents.
Ky

8) From: Barbara Greenspon
This sounds great.  I certainly would have enjoyed and learned from 
this early on.  Especially showing them how.  It sounds hard, but looks 
much more doable at first!
Barbara
On Mar 13, 2004, at 11:19 PM, John Abbott wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Vincent Price wrote an excellent art appreciation book years ago titled "I
Like What I Know," suggesting that knowing a bit about the topic of art
greatly broadened what people could actively - rather than passively -
appreciate and enjoy.  I think a similar concept applies to your
undertaking.  This is one place where 'a little something for everybody' is
a *good* idea.
Some of your audience will be interested in a touch of coffee history,
others in geographical information - where does it come from?  There ought
to be a fair tie-in with those with gardening proclivities in the
cultivation aspects and coffee ecology in general.  If I were going to do
it, I'd attempt to pique everybody's interest at least a bit with my talk,
and then get them to taste the coffee (most important step!).
The dear old Scientologists have an interesting saying that applies to
situations like you face: "Don't answer any unasked questions."  I'd save
the details of roasting as answers to questions after people have absorbed
the other material and enjoyed a cup of coffee...and want to know how to do
it themselves.
That said, I'm certain that it's going to be an interesting presentation,
and I'm just sorry I won't be there.  I know I'd have some questions...and
I'd want a cup of coffee, of course!
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

10) From: John Abbott
On Sun, 2004-03-14 at 11:08, Gene Smith wrote:
[snip]
<Snip>
Yeah and that's probably my greatest failing.  I think it stems from my
own desire to know as much about something as possible. I find minutia
about things of interest to be fascinating and therefore expect it to at
least be mildly interesting to others.  I'm borrowing liberally from the
opening pages of some respected authors.  I will try to condense it to a
few succinct statements.    
<Snip>
The park director at the second park suggested that I do a Folgers vs
Costa Rican freshly roasted taste comparison. My problem is I don't want
to buy the Folgers :o)  I assured her that they would recognize the
difference even in the absence of the Folgers.
I'm  disappearing over the horizon.  Today is my 45th wedding
anniversary and we're heading out for the rest of the day - winding up
in Corpus Christi where a bunch of our friends will surprise Carolyn.
John - thankful for a perfect partner for all these years!

11) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Mar 14, 2004, at 11:08 AM, Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Also a little effort in developing a sense of aesthetics in your 
children substantially increases the quality of the gifts you receive 
over the rest of your life.  Except for my investment of time and money 
in home coffee, I probably have gained more from lessons in the arts 
for the kids than from anything else.
Jim Gundlach

12) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Congratulations, John...in every sense of that word.  It's a good thing to
be thankful for.
Gene Smith
who recently celebrated - or failed to celebrate - his 18th.  Two days
later, it dawned on us that we had both forgotten.  We both laughed our
butts off over that, and have been celebrating ever since.

13) From: Barbara Greenspon
Congratulations on your 45th!  That's terrific.
Barbara
On Mar 14, 2004, at 11:32 AM, John Abbott wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Jean
Hi John,
Gosh, you've really gone all out - sounds like you've put together a Coffee
101 I would enjoy!
If you don't mind a gentle reminder, remember, you want to KISS your
audience - Keep It Simple, Sweetie!  For a 45 min. demonstration, it seems
that perhaps you've packed in quite a bit.  You want to leave time for
answering questions, including maybe demonstrating (re-demonstrating?)
answers to the questions.
You might like to have some visuals that folks can look at before/after
(like a world map with markers), and the handouts you've mentioned, but I
don't know that I'd go into that in great detail at an introductory roasting
demonstration.
Roast your couple of batches, start them cooling, brew rested beans that
match what you've roasted, pour (remember, you need to allow time for them
'doctor' their samples), answer questions, and raffle off your freshly
roasted beans.  - If you can manage all that in 45 mins, you'll have done an
awesome job and likely will garner a few interested folks.  (btw - if enough
people express an interest, you might want to approach the park people about
offering a 6 week or so class that would include exploring the different
regions, politics, conservation, etc. involved.)
Have fun,
Jean :~)

15) From: DJ Garcia
Hey! Happy anniversary, John & Carolyn! And hopefully dozens more!
DJ
Who will soon sing the blues missing his Blue de Brazil

16) From: Ed Needham
I bet the FR+ would be a good choice.  It's lightweight, takes up little
space, not many restrictions, or special needs, small batch, fairly safe,
etc...
Plus, it puts on a pretty good show through the glass.
Of course you could take the Hottop for the wow factor, but with your newly
published stance on their support and PR, maybe the FR+ and a popper would be
enough.
Emphasis on all the variety of tastes and sourcing green coffee would be
interesting.  Having little one pot sample bags-o-beans pre-roasted might be
a treat.  Some well brewed coffee might be popular too.
Sounds like fun, but hard work.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

17) From: John Abbott
I'll be doing my demo using the FR+  and will have 3 FR ( plain, plus
and hacked) the Wok and the HotTop sitting out table for people to see
what the differences are.    I will have done a couple of pounds in the
HT and allowed them to rest before the meetings.   
I've copied Tom's roaster page into the slide presentation and will do a
really brief overview of roasters and their strengths.  I don't want to
focus so much on the equipment that they lose the focus - Fresh Coffee!
In the next week I'll probably change my presentation a dozen times -
trying for a smooth flow and at the same time a real education in the
concept of home roasting.   I will bring the Poppery team into the
dialog because a lot of these folks only live here six months of the
year and can find them in their home thrift shops. 
I truly appreciate all of the input - all of it was meaningful! THANKS!
John - the Guzzling Gourmet
 
On Sun, 2004-03-14 at 23:54, Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Gene Smith
John, when you get it together to your satisfaction, you ought to document
what you've done.  A video would be nice.  Doesn't need to be a professional
production, because what I'm thinking is that it would be a nice guide for
others to attempt the same thing in other parts of the country.
Can't wait to hear how it goes!
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston
<Snip>

19) From: John Abbott
Gene,
You credit me with a lot more talent that I have.  This is a gathering
of retirees who have time to learn some new hobbies.  This will be far
from a technical presentation - which would just bore these folks to
tears.   I'm going to make it look as simple as possible (which it is)
and then warn them of the slippery slope they are stepping up to - but
that its OK once you learn to control the skid.
I'm going to do a wee bit of background on the poor goats in Ethiopia
and bring it down to discussions of regional choices.  Tell them some of
the pluses from each region and then of course make sure they understand
that the best of the best comes from Central America :o))
Then we'll so who wants to try what.  I will pull shots for the brave -
pour cups for the average and make some Latte's for the wusses (kidding
- really - kidding).
The closing of my pitch as it is for anything I do here is: " If the
blinds are open in my front room - then just come on in.  If the blinds
are closed but the light is on - ring the bell and give me time to
dress.  The pot is always on and we can continue this from there."
And that invitation is a standing invitation to the list.  If you're
ever in the neighborhood stop by for a gallon or two.
John
On Mon, 2004-03-15 at 09:41, Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
I still hope that you will at least give us a report on how it went, John,
along with your thoughts on things that seemed to work and things that
seemed to didn't.  Maybe we'll end up creating the coffee equivalent of a
really, really jittery Tupperware Party...
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve,
in Houston

21) From: Ky Azlein
John,
If it turns out well, and you do more in the future, let me know.  I'm in
McMinnville (I think you're in Oregon, right?) and have a boutique video
production studio here in the country.  I'd be willing to come down, shoot
the presentation, and edit it with some flair back in the studio.
Ky Azlein
Black Opal Studio
fxtc

22) From: John Abbott
Ky,
What a generous offer - thanks.  However I'm located down in the very
southern tip of Texas - a short 1500 yards from the Rio Grande River and
Mexico.   I attend the parties in Oregon because I am a west coaster at
heart - having lived and worked on the west coast some 35 years. 
John
On Mon, 2004-03-15 at 21:07, Ky Azlein wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Tom Ulmer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
you across from matamoros or reynosa?

24) From: John Abbott
We are across from Reynosa.  However we do most of our Mexican shopping
in Nuevo Progresso which doesn't ever show up on a US map.   Reynosa
seems to constantly have somebody shooting at somebody and a couple of
car jackings have taken place there.  Nuevo Progresso is a small town
that caters to the Winter Texans.  NP will be throwing a 2 day party on
the last week-end of March because that marks the end of the "season"
when most Winter Texans head back up Nawth.  With the snow storm that
just took place in the midwest to the New England coast we have lots of
folks reconsidering their departure dates.
Matamoros looks and acts like any US city.  There is more English
signage than Spanish. About every third person you talk to is employed
by a US manufacturer.  We went once just to look - won't go back unless
its to pass through on the way to Monterrey (where I really spend my
time).
I have made it a point to start looking for coffee contacts down there. 
Slow process because of the trust factor, but we will prevail.  We buy a
lot of Mexican beans at their market price and so far haven't had to pay
a tariff to bring them back.  That would change if I were bringing back
a truck full I'm sure.
Not only is coffee cheaper here - so is gasoline (1.35) and produce (33
cents a pound for tomatoes) We enjoy one of the lowest costs of living
in the US.  We have folks here in our retirement park from England,
Germany, Spain and a ton from Canada.  All come for the above reasons. 
John - roasting the last of my Peruvian stash.
On Thu, 2004-03-18 at 10:47, Tom Ulmer wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Bob Brashear
I am the official coffee purveyor at local fencing tournaments this 
fall. Took a couple of thermoses of Idido MV to my son's tournament this 
morning. Saw several people pour their swill into the drinking fountain 
after they had mine.
BTW, Tony took third place in Mixed Saber at the Autumn Equinox Open in 
St. Paul. Went up against the 15th rated Junior Saberist in the country 
and got crushed. But in a good, learning, character building way.
Tournaments the next two months. I'm gonna be busy.
Bob

26) From: gin
Bob:
Very cool...
I wouldlike you to tell your son congratulations from me. Way to go and I would love to hear about his later efforts.
best ginny
---- Bob Brashear  wrote: 
<Snip>

27) From: Stephen Carey
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Congrats to Tony and the best of his skill mixed with luck in the 
upcoming tournaments.
And congrats to you for taking your coffee and opening the eyes of others!!
Stephen
At 06:46 PM 9/23/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Congrats to Tony and the best of his skill mixed with luck
in the upcoming tournaments.
And congrats to you for taking your coffee and opening the eyes of
others!!
Stephen
At 06:46 PM 9/23/2007, you wrote:
I am the official coffee
purveyor at local fencing tournaments this fall. Took a couple of
thermoses of Idido MV to my son's tournament this morning. Saw several
people pour their swill into the drinking fountain after they had
mine.
BTW, Tony took third place in Mixed Saber at the Autumn Equinox Open in
St. Paul. Went up against the 15th rated Junior Saberist in the country
and got crushed. But in a good, learning, character building
way.
Tournaments the next two months. I'm gonna be busy.
Bob
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