HomeRoast Digest


Topic: no froth (6 msgs / 161 lines)
1) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Lower fat milk froths better and easier.  Sometimes you can get milk 
that will have some chemical added at the dairy to keep it from foaming 
during processing and too much will cause it to not foam with the steam 
wand.
Jim Gundlach
On Mar 15, 2004, at 1:38 AM, Manoj Iyer wrote:
<Snip>

2) From: Ed Needham
If you can watch someone at a local coffeehouse do it once, you can make it
work.  Describing it in words is difficult.
The froth comes from allowing the steam to push a bit of air into the milk.
So I start with the wand below the milk line and then bring the tip just up
to the top enough to make it suck a bit of air in.  The trick is to keep the
milk swirling by placing the steam wand in a position where it does this.  If
you just agitate the milk, you might get a thick, whipped cream foam, but
that's not what makes the milk based drinks like cappuccino taste the best.
Microfoam, which is fluid and thick, and takes on a bit of a sheen makes a
wonderful flavor when blended with espresso.  I also find that swirling the
microfoamed milk in the frothing pitcher until I pour it keeps it from
forming a thick spoonable foam.
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

3) From: alfred
When it comes to froth and thick steamed milk you have to have a machine
with enough steam power. I have had three espresso machines and the newest
one is the only one with sufficient quantity and power to do this. The
others produced essentially, hot milk. I tried every technique but to no
avail. Most home machines just can't compete with the big boys.

4) From: marylee jackson
The machine makes all the difference.  I used to be quite pleased with the microfoam production I was able to acheive on my Isomac Tea, but since my other half mostly drinks americanas we upgraded to a 2 group commercial Faema.  Now I see how inadequate the Tea was.  Now steaming takes half the time, with twice the quality.
 
Marylee
Coffee Obsessed In Texas
alfred <2391> wrote:
When it comes to froth and thick steamed milk you have to have a machine
with enough steam power. I have had three espresso machines and the newest
one is the only one with sufficient quantity and power to do this. The
others produced essentially, hot milk. I tried every technique but to no
avail. Most home machines just can't compete with the big boys.

5) From: Ed Needham
I've got a machine that can froth out the wazzoo now, but before this one, I
had a Gaggia Espresso.  I paid $90 for it at a Big Lots store.  There is no
comparison between the machine I have now and the Gaggia, but I could steam a
small quantity of milk for a cappuccino just as well using the Gaggia.  All
you need is enough steam to swirl the milk and inject some air.  As long as
you don't run out of steam, pretty much any cheap machine can do OK at
frothing milk.  As important as the hole configuration is to a professional,
the Gaggia had a plastic frother which I discarded, which left a one hole,
very short wand.  Crippled as it was, it still had enough in it to make
decent microfoam.  Made decent espresso too, with a bit of care, and a good
grinder.
But, hey...everyone needs a good excuse to upgrade to an expensive machine!
***********************************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
***********************************************

6) From: Manoj Iyer
I have a solis creme sl 90. I use 1/2 & 1/2 milk for making my
cuppachino, recently I noticed that I dont get any ANY froth at all. All
I get is steamed milk.
Any suggestions?
Thanks
Manjo


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