HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 3" glass cylinders today's roast (2 msgs / 76 lines)
1) From: peter zulkowski
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
We ran out of Harrar again, so this time I measured out 250 gr. to try 
in the latest rendition of the West Bend Poppery:
1500 watts with bakelite removed and glass chimney attached with RTV 
directly to the aluminum base.
The lamp chimney is 3 inches dia at base, the widest part is 4 and 1/8 
inch and it is 8 and 1/4 inches high.. It necks down to 2 " near the 
top, then flares out again.
The necking down near the top seems important because that seems to keep 
the heat in. At least less power is required with the variac to get it 
up to temperature.
Definitely would be better roasting if I did not keep changing things 
all the time, but I have never had a roast that I wanted to throw out.
That being said, this many beans in a chamber this size will probably 
take a couple of more roasts before I nail it.  It is perhaps possible 
to do 300 grams.
The blower has enough power to keep the beans moving, and  vertical 
circulation is good with the unit tilted about 20 degrees.  This time I 
had to crank the blower variac up to 140 V in the beginning.
When the roast started the beans were already up into the glass, and 
there was lots of action as the roast progressed. I had to keep turning 
down the blower to keep beans from blowing out and the circulation 
smooth. Total time was about 15 minutes to rolling second crack, and I 
shut it down at 440 F. This was not as even a roast as the previous one 
which was only 200 Gr. , maybe just a few beans lighter than the rest, 
not many at all.  Worse looking roasts have tasted just fine.
We really do not drink all that much coffee. Just have it in the back of 
my mind that I have to push the limits. Probably will get a larger 
chimney and try for a bigger batch, only for the fun of it.
Oh, 250 gr. to begin with weighed 206 when finished.
PeterZ
Still experimenting, here in LHC.
Rich Adams wrote:
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2) From: Ed Needham
An uneven roast does not mean that it will be bad.  Any roast that tastes
good is a good roast.  In reality, an uneven roast can taste better than a
homogenous roast, as long as all the beans have roasted enough to have good
flavor.  A roast like that is not commercially viable, but for a homeroaster,
it's really no problem.  Greenish beans mixed with charred beans won't be
very pleasant though.  I prefer to have a bit more control and roast evenly
but blend lighter and darker roasts of the same bean once in a while.
I'd guess that the larger batch size stifles the agitation to the point that
some beans stay in the hot zone longer, while some are left out.  Finding the
batch size that works for each bean density would be a pain, but finding a
batch size that works for all might be a good target.  It might not be the
largest batch size for bragging rights, but it will consistently give you
good roasts.
Rambling,
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Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
"Nunc Aut Nunquam"
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
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