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Topic: Using a variac with the Fresh Roast Plus (2 msgs / 61 lines)
1) From: Abraham Carmeli
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I purchased a variac and a thermometer to be used with the Fresh Roast =
Plus
Home roaster.  I am trying to get as close as I can get to a roasting
profile of a commercial roaster.  Does anyone have any experience with =
using
the above gadgets together to achieve the perfect roast.  I am =
interested in
a full bodied Full City+.
 
Thanks,
Abe Carmeli

2) From: Jim Schulman
On 15 Mar 2004 at 18:58, Abraham Carmeli wrote:
<Snip>
The simplest way is to plug the FR into the Variac and run the 
Varaic at maximum voltage to get the largest load possible (tilt 
the roaster). The roast will go fast, since the heat is high. 
When you hear the first pop of the first crack, turn the variac 
down until the beans are barely moving and leave it there a 
minute. If you catch it right the first crack won;tstart and the 
beans will even up in color. Raise the voltage to normal (110) 
until the the first crack is well under way, then reduce to 
around 100 till the end of the roast. 
You're shooting for 5 minutes from the start of the first crack 
to the end of the roast. The forst crack thermometer reading 
will be 385F to 405F, your desired roast level will be at around 
455F to 465F. So you want to set the voltage to get about 15F 
per minute.
This will gove you a mellow roast, but is not quite a drum roast 
profile. A drum profile requires that the fan is wired 
separately from the variac, and the heat is used for the variac 
alone. That will allow you to control the heat from the start of 
the roast. A drum profile would be a roast that takes 10 to 15 
minutes, with most of the roast time before the first crack from 
250 to 380, and a shorter time from there to end, about 3 1/2 to 
4 minutes.
I have some instructions for doing the split wiring athttp://briefcase.yahoo.com/jim_schulmanIf you know nothing about electrical wiring, have someone who 
does help you, 
since there's a few gotcha's involved.
Jim


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