HomeRoast Digest


Topic: La Pavoni (20 msgs / 448 lines)
1) From: Richard T. Simoni, Sr.
Hi everyone,
Got my La Pavoni for Xmas. Gosh, you've got to love the feel and look of
this machine - - is it a machine or the most beautiful female ever seen
or felt. If in a hurry in the mornings, get a automatic machine - - if
you're into sensual, the La Pavoni is your natural choice.
Of course, you must learn to use the La Pavoni, no mean task. But when
you get there, and have the time to get the most out of it (much like
love), you'll be glad to have the flexibility this machine offers in
producing the coffee just as you might wish.
A friend of mine brought over her La Pavoni and made coffer for me back
when I was still using a french press with Sweet Maria's beans. I
decided then and there that I had to have the La Pavoni Europiccola.
Best
Richard Simoni

2) From: Peter Zulkowski
In a markdown shop there sits, brand new in the box, a LaPavoni Europicola;
the $579.00 version
for $400.00. (Plus tax)
Either price is a stretch for my budget, but would anyone think this is 
comparable to a Miss Sylvia?
Is it worth going to the Master Charge god for it or should I continue 
to save my pennies toward an Andreja?
It seems like a great buy, but is the equipment really worth it?
Gosh it is beautiful, but will it make great espresso?
Please help,
PeterZ
Wondering if it will be there long, here in Gloucester, MA.

3) From: Peter Zulkowski
In a markdown shop there sits, brand new in the box, a LaPavoni Europicola;
the $579.00 version
for $400.00. (Plus tax)
Either price is a stretch for my budget, but would anyone think this is 
comparable to a Miss Sylvia?
Is it worth going to the Master Charge god for it or should I continue 
to save my pennies toward an Andreja?
It seems like a great buy, but is the equipment really worth it?
Gosh it is beautiful, but will it make great espresso?
Please help,
PeterZ
Wondering if it will be there long, here in Gloucester, MA.
<Snip>

4) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Peter,
I just got bought one of the La Pavoni Europiccolas.  These are a lot
different than the auto/semi-auto machines.
Here's a good, basic website that gives you an idea of what you'll be in fo=
r:http://www.lightlink.com/kazys/pavoni.htmlThey are beautfiul machines; but just require a different approach
and, apparently, more patience and effort.
-- 
Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
Espressing myself in a Via Veneto and LaPavoni
On 7/11/05, Peter Zulkowski  wrote:
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a;
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5) From: Jim Karavias
My experience with the La Pavoni is that it can indeed make a great 
espresso but you have to really get the 'zen' of it down.  Everything 
has to be just perfect for it to be a great shot.  I have one and can 
consistently get OK shots, occasionally great shots, never a God shot.  
And you only get about 3 tries per boiler full.  Then its a cool down 
cycle, refill, reheat.  Try keeping even a small dinner party happy with 
that output.  I'm looking for something more repeatable at higher volumes.
Jim
Peter Zulkowski wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: tom ulmer
Wouldn't sit there long if I knew where it was.

7) From: Les
Peter,
It is a great machine for that price, but a lever machine is a whole 
different espresso experience. There is a real learning curve to a lever 
machine. It will make great espresso. However plan on at least two weeks to=
 
two months learning how to pull a good shot on it. A great shot is in all=
 
likelihood 3 months down the learning curve. You can't compare a lever to a=
 
pump driven machine, they are two different animals. I have a lever, and it=
 
is fun to play with, but for daily use, I am too lazy and love my pump 
driven machine.
 Les
 On 7/12/05, Peter Zulkowski  wrote: 
<Snip>

8) From: Jim Mitchell
As the owner of 2 Pavonis, a Lusso, and a certifiable lever-freak - I will 
second Jim K's thoughtful comments which just about perfectly sums up life 
with one of these machines.
There is something seductively beautiful about them, I do take pleasure in 
making my morning shot - rather than merely producing it - but I also have 
come to believe that unless you find a screaming (e.g. $175 or less) deal on 
a used one in functional shape they are not a particularly wise or balanced 
way to spend your espresso dollar.
Why? because (especially in July - a buyer's market) there are so many good 
deals available on used or upper-entry level machines that I question 
spending $400 on a Pavoni which has such a narrow range of usefulness.
As a thought exercise, I'll assume that Peter is coming from a Mocha pot and 
has no current equipment - for example from SM themselves, he could buy a 
new Gaggia and a Solis grinder and a Freshroast +8 for about $50 more than 
the Pavoni. Which setup, while not perfect, will put him pretty much in 
control of his coffee destiny and product some excellent shots without 
excessive hair-tearing or risk-taking.
Contra-wise, for the adventurous, there is currently a used Simonelli Oscar 
on Ebay going begging at $399, a refurbished Grimac (sold as a Expression 1) 
just went for about $430, there are several Livias under $600, an Isomac Tea 
at $600 and on Craigslist (www.craislist.org) in Portland there is a Renke 
1-group commercial, which many consider better than a La Chimbali or San 
Marco for $475.
The biggest drawback to most of the smaller levers IMHO is that they simply 
don't hold enough ground coffee in their baskets to make repeatable decent 
double shots, which is what most of us really drink much of the time. I've 
been playing with a Gram scale, and am very depressed to find that the 
Pavoni really only holds 10-11 grams, the La Peppini about 9-10, and the 
Lusso chokes at 12-13. Which, when you remember that the LaMarzocco doubles 
are 14-16 grams isn't enough to pour a full 2oz shot.
Anyway, those are this morning's thoughts
Cheers
Jim
{snip!}

9) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Peter Zulkowski wrote:
<Snip>
Sounds Good!! You can show it to me the next time I'm in LHC! ;-)
<Snip>
-- 
Life in the fast lane ......
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the juice of aribica that thoughts acquire speed,
the lips acquire stains.
The stains become a warning.
It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

10) From: Rob Stewart
My son has a La Pavoni that he bought new about a year or more ago and I was
sure he must be really screwing things up as his shots are pretty bad......
really suck actually.  So, when I was there last I decided to really check
it out and show him what the results could be.   Plenty of good beans later
the shots either poured out like tea or not hardly at all and could not find
the in between.  This would be a good project if you were going to be in
prison for a while.  Sure looks nice though.
Rob

11) From: Alchemist John
Check out e-bay right now.  For some reason, there are quite a number 
of la Pavoni on right now, some at quite good prices.  A few demo 
models.  Even one being sold "for parts".  I plan to see what is 
wrong with that one.  The hardware for under $100 would be nice if it 
is just a heater or thermostat.
The is a particularly sharp looking copper and brass one.
At 08:28 7/12/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

12) From: miKe mcKoffee
What grinder were you using trying to dial in the LP shots?
miKe
From: "Rob Stewart" 
Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2005 7:21 PM
<Snip>

13) From: Rob Stewart
A Mazzer that was purchased new when he got the LP.
Rob

14) From: Alchemist John
Is that infinately adjustable or does it have clicks?  I have heard 
you can get caught between clicks on lever machines.
At 05:47 7/13/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

15) From: Rob Stewart
It was in January.... but as I recall it's clicks.

16) From: Gregg Talton
Since I'm already out of lurk mode ...
I have had a La Pavoni Europicolla for about 15 years and it's more than
time for an overhaul - o-rings mostly.  I'm rather handy and thinking about
replacing the o-rings myself. Anyone have any experience with this or should
I pay the $125 or so to a shop and let someone else deal with it?
Gregg
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17) From: miKe mcKoffee
Highly suggest visiting and searching the Home-Barista Lever Espresso
Machines forum. If it's been done to a lever espresso machine, it's been
discussed there. Rebuilds have definitely been done and discussed.http://www.home-barista.com/levers/Slave to the Bean  miKe mcKoffee
www.CompassCoffeeRoasting.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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18) From: Michael Mccandless
I have a few.
@ last check the rebuild kit was ~$30.
Try:http://pavoni.varnelis.net/(recommended)">http://www.espressoparts.com/http://www.orphanespresso.com/http://pavoni.varnelis.net/(recommended)
McSparky
On Mon, Sep 6, 2010 at 8:57 AM, Gregg Talton  wrote:
<Snip>
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19) From: g paris
Hi Gregg:
most folks here, at homeroasters.org and coffee geek would tell you to do it
yourself.
especially if you are handy.
my guess is that the insides are mostly stainless or brass fittings so you
should
not have an issue with breaking parts as you go through.
I think Tom has an info sheet here for changing out the o-rings or you
can find a sheet online.
good luck, take pictures.
ginny
On Mon, Sep 6, 2010 at 8:57 AM, Gregg Talton  wrote:
<Snip>
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20) From: Dennis Parham
Hey Greg, Let me know what year it is or send me some pics.. I have restored a few of them and I am currently restoring and modifying a 1971 Europicolla .... HTe older models around that year have a brass insert and a couple of oranges the newer ones use a plastic ( nylon) group insert.. with a little wiring mods to make it safe for the home ( mine was 2 prong now 3 prong )these are fantastic machines!
Dennis Parham
On Sep 6, 2010, at 2:28 PM, Michael Mccandless wrote:
<Snip>
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