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Topic: Nautical Roastering (was: Final Jeopardy 04/08) (4 msgs / 78 lines)
1) From: John Blumel
On Apr 11, 2004, at 11:59am, Arien Malec wrote:
<Snip>
Gene Smith and I are all over this question on various other mailing 
lists.
I've also been doing a bit of googling and, although this is from a 
slightly later period, I like to think they may have used something 
like the Wood's Patent Cannonball Coffee Roaster shown here:
  http://tinyurl.com/2gtk6John Blumel

2) From: John Blumel
BTW, 'roastering' (see subject) is an archaic term for the process of 
and skills related to operating a roasting device. Some scholars in the 
mid 20th century mistakenly thought this was simply a contraction of 
'roaster ring' -- a ring that was placed under the roaster to hold it 
in place -- but this was proved, by later research, to be incorrect. It 
is little known that there was actually, in the late 18th and early 
19th centuries a Roastering Guild and a long apprenticeship was 
required to be admitted as a member. This guild was recently reborn as 
the Roasters Guild.
John Blumel

3) From: Dan Bollinger
A ship's contingent could be 50-300 crew. A little home roaster couldn't have
kept up. They'd have needed 2 to 12 pounds daily just to serve each man one cup.
Ships galley stoves were huge, like restaurant ranges. If they had a stove top
roaster it would have been good sized. Or, perhaps they had a dedicated roaster.
Why not ask here:
Bramah Museum of Tea and Coffeehttp://www.bramahmuseum.co.uk/or
Mystic Seaport Museumhttp://www.mysticseaport.org/Dan
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

4) From: John Blumel
On Apr 11, 2004, at 5:09pm, Dan Bollinger wrote:
<Snip>
I don't think, at least in the Royal Navy of the Napoleonic wars, that 
coffee was part of the official ship's stores/provisions, nor was it 
served to the crew. However, even just for the officers, they might 
have needed a fairly large roaster.
Will check out the links.
John Blumel


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