HomeRoast Digest


Topic: A mans first roast. (5 msgs / 278 lines)
1) From: Wilson, Steven B
This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
Hi Everybody,
    I got all set up and ready to go, the cast iron pan and wire wisk, a
colander and fan. I picked the poor recipient for my first roast the night
before, I got some nice beans from Maria so I had to be a little picky, no
since trying a peaberry first since I have never had a peaberry coffee
before.
    There is a little wind blowing in the yard so I make a quick cover for
the burner (maybe a mistake) and I am ready.
    I warm up the pan to get it hot, and throw in the beans. stirring
constantly and watching, I didn't want to miss a thing.
    We are getting browner in about 3 minutes and the smell of burning
rabbit food is turning my daughter off but I am stirring and watching.
    Getting browner and the smell is going away and we are getting some
cracks I hear as well.
    I hear a difference there is a difference in the cracks the second being
like rice crispys more common and not so violent.
 
    I like this brown, I look down and only 10 minutes has passed, Did I
cook to fast? huh oh.
    into the fan, what the hell, and stir.
 
    after they cooled and about an hour later I ground a pots worth and gave
it a deep smell, nice woody coffee aroma, I think I pulled off a miracle,
BUT.
    I MADE FOLGERS! take my Okie butt down a notch. I made a pot and I swear
it looks tastes just like a damn can of folgers coffee, I better, get better
at this.
 
    new motto "Roast longer" and I think it was to hot in that pan. but, man
everything that I heard/read about was definitely in that pan, the turning
of the colors as well as descriptions of the cracks. I think everybody
should do this once just to watch it happen. I am taking my next batch a lot
darker and at a lower temperature. I also think this is going to help me in
deciding which machine I will buy in the future because when I saw the
flakiness of that chaff (I see fire), that stuff would be dangerous in a
closed environment with heat, or is it all carbon?
 
check out pictures.
 http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ecvsteve/album?.dir=/1af0&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ecvsteve
bal.net/my_photos
 
Hope that link works
Steve W.
    
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
Message
Hi 
Everybody,
    I 
got all set up and ready to go, the cast iron pan and wire wisk, a colander and 
fan. I picked the poor recipient for my first roast the night before, I got some 
nice beans from Maria so I had to be a little picky, no since trying a peaberry 
first since I have never had a peaberry coffee before.
    There is a little wind blowing in the yard so I make a quick cover for 
the burner (maybe a mistake) and I am ready.
    I 
warm up the pan to get it hot, and throw in the beans. stirring constantly and 
watching, I didn't want to miss a thing.
    We are getting browner in about 3 minutes and the smell of burning rabbit 
food is turning my daughter off but I am stirring and 
watching.
    Getting browner and the smell is going away and we are getting some 
cracks I hear as well.
    I 
hear a difference there is a difference in the cracks the second being like rice 
crispys more common and not so violent.
 
    I 
like this brown, I look down and only 10 minutes has passed, Did I cook to fast? 
huh oh.
    into the fan, what the hell, and stir.
 
    after they cooled and about an hour later I ground a pots worth and 
gave it a deep smell, nice woody coffee aroma, I think I pulled off a miracle, 
BUT.
    I 
MADE FOLGERS! take my Okie butt down a notch. I made a pot and I swear it looks 
tastes just like a damn can of folgers coffee, I better, get better at 
this.
 
    new motto "Roast longer" and I think it was to hot in that pan. but, man 
everything that I heard/read about was definitely in that pan, the turning of 
the colors as well as descriptions of the cracks. I think everybody should do 
this once just to watch it happen. I am taking my next batch a lot 
darker and at a lower temperature. I also think this is going to help me in 
deciding which machine I will buy in the future because when I saw the flakiness 
of that chaff (I see fire), that stuff would be dangerous in a closed 
environment with heat, or is it all carbon?
 
check out 
pictures.
 http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ecvsteve/album?.dir=/1af0&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ecvsteve/my_photos 
Hope that link 
works
Steve 
W.
    

2) From: Peter Barnes
Good to hear about your roast.
it sounds to me like two things might have happened - a bit fast on the 
roast, and perhaps undercooked on the inside.  i don't know how high the 
heat was, but the one thing to watch out for in pan roasting is that the 
pan can singe the edges of the beans without cooking them all the way 
through.  But don't worry!  My first couple of roasts in the wok came 
out horrible, even after several years of roasting experience.
I just glanced through those pics, and it looks to me like the roast was 
uneven.  What I like to do when the beans start browning is to turn down 
the heat and stir like a madman to get all the beans up to the same 
temp.  Also, a few beans look singed, which may call for more vigorous 
stirring on your part.
I would recommend some of the following things...
1.  try starting the roast at a lower temp, and gradually raise the 
temp, then lower it for a bit after you hit first crack to even out the 
roast
2.  try using a spoon instead of a wisk.  check out pecan jim's wok 
roasting page: http://www.ineedcoffee.com/00/03/wok/3.  try using more beans.  i'd say you could probably double what you 
used in those pics.
cheers
peter
Wilson, Steven B wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: petzul
Good link!
Nice story also!
Do not give up!
Sounds like you are doing fine with this, but I do not know how you made 
F*lgers :(
Did someone pull a switch on you perhaps???
You may find (I did anyway) that the beans have a wide variety of taste 
depending on how long you roast, how long you linger at different 
temperatures, how quickly/slowly you get to first crack. Probably more 
things than I can put into words affect the taste of the same batch of 
beans.
Then you get to how long they age;
how you grind them;
how you brew them;
and then you may find the taste changes from one CUP to another;
and even in the same CUP different flavors develop / go away as the 
coffee you just made cools.
Have I covered all the different variables and nuances??
NOPE!
Is it worth the trip???
YUP!!!!!   :)
PeterZ
Still exploring the journey, Here in LHC.
Wilson, Steven B wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Steven,
       Nice pictures, really shows what was happening.  My complement to =
the photographer.  Just two thoughts.  Some of the beans are 
under-roasted.  You need a better stirring tool.   Something to make 
sure the beans are rotated into and out of contact with the pan.  Pan 
was probably too hot, resulting in some beans roasting too dark on the =
outside before they got heated all the way through.  I may be jumping 
to a bit of a conclusion from the series of pictures, but it looks like =
you quit roasting soon after the pan started smoking.  Reduce the heat =
a bit, stir better, and you should have something much better than 
folgers.  You might also let this batch rest for about four days and 
try it again.
Jim Gundlach
On Apr 12, 2004, at 12:58 PM, Wilson, Steven B wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
and I 
<Snip>
Steven,
      Nice pictures, really shows what was happening.  My complement
to the photographer.  Just two thoughts.  Some of the beans are
under-roasted.  You need a better stirring tool.   Something to make
sure the beans are rotated into and out of contact with the pan.  Pan
was probably too hot, resulting in some beans roasting too dark on the
outside before they got heated all the way through.  I may be jumping
to a bit of a conclusion from the series of pictures, but it looks
like you quit roasting soon after the pan started smoking.  Reduce the
heat a bit, stir better, and you should have something much better
than folgers.  You might also let this batch rest for about four days
and try it again.
Jim Gundlach 
On Apr 12, 2004, at 12:58 PM, Wilson, Steven B wrote:
Arialafter they cooled
and about an hour later I ground a pots worth and gave it a deep
smell, nice woody coffee aroma, I think I pulled off a miracle, =
BUT.
    ArialI MADE FOLGERS! take =
my
Okie butt down a notch. I made a pot and I swear it looks tastes just
like a damn can of folgers coffee, I better, get better at =
this.
 =

5) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Pecan Jim Gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
 I agree with all Jim's points above. I'll add, as someone who
roasted for 20 years with a pan like that, (never thought to try
a popper, and often didn't have electricity) try tilting the
pan. It's more work, and you might need a better glove, but you
get better mixing and a more even end result.
  Charlie
=====
Brick Oven Roasting in British Columbia
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/


HomeRoast Digest