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Topic: 125-gram Loads in the Hottop (2 msgs / 77 lines)
1) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
If you've ever wondered just how small a load you can roast in your
Hottop, I think I've found it.  I decided that I'd like to drink
Mokha/Java at work this week, so last Saturday I set out to roast some
up.  
 
I like my Mokha/Java ratio at about 1::2 or 1::3.  The nominal roast
weight for the Hottop is ~250g, so I figured that 250g of Sumatra
Classic and 125g of Yemen Ismaili would be just about right.
 
I roasted the Sumatran about forty seconds into second crack -- not very
far on a Hottop.  I started with a cold roaster and used the delayed
bean introduction method.  I delayed about five minutes after the Hottop
started beeping and finished up about 17 minutes later.  Everything was
hot, straight and normal.
 
Then I measured out 125g of the Ismaili and planned to use the same
technique but to stop the roast at the barest edge of second crack.
125g is, by far, the smallest load I've ever tried to roast with the
Hottop.  One of the nice things about the Hottop is that with a 250g
load, the glass window is arranged so that you can see a continuously
changing cross-section of the roasting mass.  With a 125g load, however,
there was not enough mixing volume and the row of beans along the
viewing window never changed!  Well, I said never, but actually, every
two or three minutes they would change, but not nearly at the rate they
do with a larger load.
 
I'm not sure if it was entirely due to the smaller load, or if it had
something to do with the tiny little Yemen beans, but I know that with
larger loads of the same beans there is plenty of mixing action.
 
So when the batch finished up -- 11 minutes! -- it was a little
variegated.  But then, in my experience, Yemen roasts are always
variegated, so perhaps it was normal.  :-)  I guess I should try running
a 125g load of a larger bean.
 
At any rate, as I sip on my Cafe Crema this morning, I am entirely
pleased but I wouldn't try a smaller batch with the same beans.
 
What is your experience withsmall loads?
 
-- Rick
 

2) From: Bob Yellin
<Snip>
Hi Rick,
Here are my notes on the smallest load I have tried to date in the =
Hottop:
Coffee Type: Papua New Guinea -Purosa Estate
Weight:  155.1 grams
Ambient Temperature: 63F
First Crack: Time: 9:45 (after dumping beans in). Temperature: 401.6F  
Eject: Time: 11:05 Temperature: 436.3F
Roast: City+ - before 2nd crack
Appearance: medium dark brown - dry surface
Roasting Notes: Uneven beginning - evened out at the end
Misc Notes: No manipulation of the voltage. Beans put into roaster after
8:00 min @ 417F
Tasting Notes: In a cappa, very mild, pleasant with a slight "off" taste =
-
not unpleasant. Cappa is very chocolaty. Very strong, pleasant aroma from
the ground beans. In Melior French press, fruity, and exotic - not great
but not bad. Sour as an espresso but not terrible.
I have more extensive tasting notes if you like. The main thing to note
relative to your experience is the unevenness at the beginning and the
eventual evening out. It may have to do with bean size (or weight) as you
suggest.
Bob Yellin


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