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Topic: Zassenhaus question (68 msgs / 1725 lines)
1) From: DEchelbarg
I am thinking about getting a Zassenhaus mill from Sweet Maria's.  I plan to 
use it largely for espresso and when the power is out (regular occurrence 
where I live).  I'm thinking it might save my Solis Maestro Plus if I transfer the 
espresso grind to the Zassenhaus.  I'm debating on the whether or not to get 
the grain mill or a knee mill.  My counter top has a slight water lip and I'm 
wondering if a grain mill would clamp to -- I'm guessing that it would tip.  I 
make perhaps two espresso pulls a day -- not a great deal of use.  I have a 
Solis SL70. 
I would appreciate any advice.    
David Echelbarger

2) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
David,
    Get the knee mill, the grain mill creates a lot of dust that will 
make the coffee bitter.  i have both.
          jim gundlach
On Apr 14, 2004, at 1:35 PM, DEchelbarg wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
Maestro 
<Snip>
debating 
<Snip>
<Snip>
two 
<Snip>
David,
   Get the knee mill, the grain mill creates a lot of dust that will
make the coffee bitter.  i have both.
         jim gundlach
On Apr 14, 2004, at 1:35 PM, DEchelbarg wrote:
ArialI am thinking
about getting a Zassenhaus mill from Sweet Maria's.  I plan to use it
largely for espresso and when the power is out (regular occurrence
where I live).  I'm thinking it might save my Solis Maestro Plus if I
transfer the espresso grind to the Zassenhaus.  I'm debating on the
whether or not to get the grain mill or a knee mill.  My counter top
has a slight water lip and I'm wondering if a grain mill would clamp
to -- I'm guessing that it would tip.  I make perhaps two espresso
pulls a day -- not a great deal of use.  I have a Solis =
SL70. 
=
Arial 
ArialI would appreciate any
advice.    
=
Arial 
ArialDavid =
Echelbarger
=

3) From: AlChemist John
Between the two, get the knee mill.  On the unsolicited advise side, I like 
the 169DG of the Zass models.  I use it exclusively as my grinder, be it 
drip, press or espresso.  By marking the adjustment knob, it adjusts easily 
and consistently.
Sometime around 11:35 AM 4/14/2004, DEchelbarg typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

4) From: leslee berringer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi this message is in response to John Nanci's reply to David =
Echelbarger re: The knee or grain mill Zass?
I was looking at the Zass myself, but as not too strong a female (I mean =
not at all), do you think I would be able to grind using the knee mill? =
Has anyone's wife tried this? That is a wife that is weak in the arms?  =
Also, this may be a ridiculous question since the name clearly indicates =
the use of one's knees in using this mill, but must you use your knees?  =
Any other ways to gain leverage or does this also double as a 'thigh =
master' (exercise machine)?
Also I did see that someone on coffee geek recommended the grain mill, =
so I was curious as to whether you John have tried this machine and =
compared it to the knee, or if anyone out there has tried both and =
believes both grinders to be equally matched in quality of grinds for =
all types of coffee brewing methods?
Thank you for any and all answers.  
Leslee Berringer

5) From: Dave Huddle
<Snip>
<Snip>
I hold the knee mill between my thighs.  My boney knees don't
appreciate the contact with the mill.   I use it twice a day, most days.
The knee mill is really easy to use.
Dave  Westerville, OH 
(whose wife NEVER makes coffee, although she enjoys drinking it)

6) From: Mychael Morohovich
Hi-
I purchased the Zassenhaus Grain Mill and have been enjoying it. Mostly I
use it for espresso and French press grinds (for which it has worked to my
satisfaction), though I have also ground some rice and oats after wiping the
coffee debris away from the grinding mechanism.
It doesn't clamp perfectly to a countertop equipped with a raised edge, but
well enough for me. If the kids (5 & 7 yrs.) wish to grind, I tend to steady
the grinder for them as a precaution though I haven't always done so and
have suffered no bad incidents.
The unit is very well made and has impressed any who have had occasion to
inspect it.
Mychael

7) From: Myron Joshua
I think that a wife should not have problems with the manual grinder. It is
not hard, but can be tiring over time (especially fine grinding.) My
Grandkids can turn it by themselves.
For a different angle I would compare the knee model vs BOX model. I find
the Box model very easy to control and get good leverage when using it on a
table or counter top and on my lap. I hold it between my knees as well. I
found the knee grinder less stable (it has a narrow base and is taller) when
trying to use it anyplace other than between the knees.
The knee grinder has a narrower drawer, and this might be a little advantage
for pouring our grinds.
Enjoy the Zass!
best. myron

8) From: DEchelbarg
Myron, thank you and others for the input.  I am not set on a knee model if 
folks think that the box works better.  Any recommendations are welcome and 
helpful.  I plan on using this for an espresso grind.  Thank you again.
Dave Echelbarger

9) From: Johnny Kent
We've had a 151 for about 12 years now.
Modified in that I took the top part out of the box, the mill part, and
remounted it in a larger box that will take a squat 12 oz glass tumbler
beneath the burrs to catch the coffee. Also there's an outrigger on the box
to allow clamping to the counter top.
The 169 appears to have a stronger yoke than the 151 but the 151 has
sufficed for us all this time.
Ours is dialed in easily with an added mark on the adjustment knob. Used
for both presspot and espresso daily, and occasionally for drip. The
changeover is a simple twirl of the knob, or a slight shift for altering
the espresso shot.
17 grams for a double espresso  takes about 90 revs and about 45 seconds.
Twice that amount for a medium presspot takes about the same revs & time as
the grind is coarser.
One easy mod to a knee mill might be to screw a 1/2 inch thick plank across
the base and then the outrigging part of this can be clamped to a
countertop edge. 
I am very happy to have clamped mine though we did without that for several
years, now I wonder why...
At 02:35 PM 4/14/2004 David Echelbarger wrote:
<Snip>
to use it largely for espresso and when the power is out (regular
occurrence where I live).  I'm thinking it might save my Solis Maestro Plus
if I transfer the espresso grind to the Zassenhaus.  I'm debating on the
whether or not to get the grain mill or a knee mill.  My counter top has a
slight water lip and I'm wondering if a grain mill would clamp to -- I'm
guessing that it would tip.  I make perhaps two espresso pulls a day -- not
a great deal of use.  I have a Solis SL70. 
  
I would appreciate any advice.

10) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
--Apple-Mail-51-726371753
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Leslee,
      My 5-year old granddaughter can do it.  I don't know if I have the =
name right but when you buy a knee Zass, you get a free ThighMaster.
           Jim Gundlach
On Apr 15, 2004, at 9:46 AM, leslee berringer wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
the 
<Snip>
clearly 
<Snip>
<Snip>
double 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
I 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
Maestro 
<Snip>
debating 
<Snip>
<Snip>
two 
<Snip>
SL70.
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-51-726371753
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charsetO-8859-1
Leslee,
     My 5-year old granddaughter can do it.  I don't know if I have
the name right but when you buy a knee Zass, you get a free
ThighMaster.
          Jim Gundlach
On Apr 15, 2004, at 9:46 AM, leslee berringer wrote:
VerdanaHi this
message is in response to John Nanci's reply to David Echelbarger re:
The knee or grain mill Zass?
=
Verdana 
VerdanaI was looking at the
Zass myself, but as not too strong a female (I mean not at all), do
you think I would be able to grind using the knee mill? Has anyone's
wife tried this? That is a wife that is weak in the arms?  Also, =
this
may be a ridiculous question since the name clearly indicates the use
of one's knees in using this mill, but must you use your knees?  Any
other ways to gain leverage or does this also double as a 'thigh
master' (exercise machine)?
=
Verdana 
VerdanaAlso I did see that
someone on coffee geek recommended the grain mill, so I was curious as
to whether you John have tried this machine and compared it to the
knee, or if anyone out there has tried both and believes both grinders
to be equally matched in quality of grinds for all types of coffee
brewing methods?
=
Verdana 
VerdanaThank you for any and
all answers. 
Verdana =
 
VerdanaLeslee =
Berringer
=
Verdana 
Arial

11) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 07:46 AM 4/15/2004, leslee berringer typed:
<Snip>
I don't have the knee or grain mill.  I have the 169DG.  Maria (or SM) who 
is on the slight side does not recommend the 169 for smaller people.  It 
takes some upper body strength to keep it steady on the counter and 
grind.  OTOH, it is a great way to build those triceps.  As for the knee or 
grain, I would recommend the knee.  You have lots of leverage that way.  I 
did not go that route as I did not want to sit every time I used my 
grinder.  Must you use your knees?  I guess not, but it is probably the 
best leaverage and least work.
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

12) From: Mychael Morohovich
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
If there is a question about needing lots of strength to crank the Zass =
Grain Mill, the answer is "no". The long crank provides more than =
adequate leverage. In fact, it is so easy to grind coffee beans in the =
thing that it is very nearly an unsatisfying act! The thing is designed =
for reducing hard wheat to rubble- or flour if you have the patience. =
Coffee beans provide little resistance on their way to becoming fodder =
for the pot.
One other thing. My experience is such that the horizontal nature of the =
grain mill [meaning that the auger and burr are horizontal] doesn't =
provide purely automatic feed. Gravity isn't there to assist, and =
relatively large coffee beans do not feed so well as grain. It is no big =
deal, really, but I have to assist the beans somewhat on their way from =
hopper to auger.
Mychael

13) From: Angelo
I have the knee grinder. I only tried it once between my knees to know that 
position was not for me.
I hold it to my chest with my left hand and grind away with my right....I 
have relatively hands and the grinder fits nicely. I think about 30 turns 
does it for me for about 12 grams of beans...
I think the next one I would get would be the type with the crank on the 
side (horizontal) turning a vertical gear.....
Btw, I use a thick rubber band wrapped under the adjusting nut to keep it 
in place...works fine..
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

14) From: leslee berringer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks for the reply Angelo.  I appreciate your input.  Having options =
adds spice to life's grinds, yes?
Ciao, Leslee

15) From: DEchelbarg
It too appreciate the replies on the Zassenhaus.  I'm thinking of getting the 
DG 169 -- anyone know how much I can grind with one filling?  Any downsides 
to this grinder?

16) From: AlChemist John
I can fit about 50g into the hopper.  It then takes two one minute 
grindings (for me) to grind that much, emptying the grounds at the 1/2 way 
point.  The only downside I know of is the adjustment collar drifts without 
a drop of locktight on it.  I added a drop two years ago when I got it and 
I have not complaints or problems with it, and now go from espresso to drip 
regularly.
Sometime around 12:59 PM 4/19/2004, DEchelbarg typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

17) From: Ben Treichel
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
Hey, has the latest family addition arrived yet??
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

18) From: AlChemist John
No, I am a little surprised.  I need to give them a call.
Sometime around 05:49 AM 4/20/2004, Ben Treichel typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

19) From: AlChemist John
And it arrived today.  Quite beautiful.  The basket goes off to Les for a 
proper tamper fit, a couple of different roasts are resting and I will 
probably try a few shots tomorrow morning.
Sometime around 06:18 AM 4/20/2004, AlChemist John typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

20) From: Ben Treichel
AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
So, I was in D.C for a couple of days, how is it? FYI, you would love my 
sisters place. Pond, wood heat, sit oot on the porch and watch the 
geese, and the swans, and the foxes, and the Mule tending his sheep.

21) From: Johnny Kent
Good to see you taking on the accent as you move closer to Canada...
very adaptable ;D
At 09:35 PM 4/22/2004 -0400, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: DEchelbarg
Just Got my new Zassenhaus manual grinder, the DG 169 I believe, the closed 
hopper with the big handle.  I am reading the instructions which say this: 
"Turn the adjusting nut clockwise one turn.  If you feel resistance or hear any 
metallic sound . . . . . you are set to grind for Filter Coffee.  One half turn 
clockwise from this position will produce an excellent filter coffee grind."  
This seems redundant.  Should it read "espresso grind?"  There is no mention 
of grinding for espresso.  Those of you who use this for espresso grind can you 
give me some advice?  Eager to play!
Thanks
Dave Echelbarger, Upper Peninsula.  Yes, there is still snow in my front 
yard! 

23) From: DEchelbarg
Never mind, figured it out, finally.  Good thing I'm in the humanities.  
Curious, thing, is that the grind I settled on looks a bit courser than my Solis M 
Plus espresso grind; but it tamped more compacted and it choked the machine.  
So much for eyes and feel -- the tamp was different.
In a message dated 4/28/2004 6:38:36 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
DEchelbarg writes:
Just Got my new Zassenhaus manual grinder, the DG 169 I believe, the closed 
hopper with the big handle.  I am reading the instructions which say this: 
"Turn the adjusting nut clockwise one turn.  If you feel resistance or hear any 
metallic sound . . . . . you are set to grind for Filter Coffee.  One half turn 
clockwise from this position will produce an excellent filter coffee grind."  
This seems redundant.  Should it read "espresso grind?"  There is no mention 
of grinding for espresso.  Those of you who use this for espresso grind can you 
give me some advice?  Eager to play!
Thanks
Dave Echelbarger, Upper Peninsula.  Yes, there is still snow in my front 
yard! 

24) From: DEchelbarg
RK,
Thank you!  I appreciate the information.  Nice grinder I had a fun evening 
with it.
Dave Echelbarger
RK wrote: 
Dave. I adjust my Zass this way. I turn the adjusting screw CCw until the 
burrs lock up. I then go CW just short of 1/2 turn for espresso, and another 1/2 
turn for drip.
RK

25) From: Johnny Kent
And I do similarly on my 151,  and 1/8th turn or more for press cw from drip
At 10:06 PM 4/29/2004 -0400, you wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: AlChemist John
Let me just say what I do.  Turn the nut fully CCW until the burrs lock.  I 
turn about 1/4 CW for espresso.  The burrs still just rub.  I turn another 
1/4-1/2 for drip.  Also, don't forget a drop of locktight on the threads or 
the nut will tend to drift in the course of one grinding.  Oh, I also have 
marked my nut with a sharpie so I know where it is.
Sometime around 03:23 PM 4/28/2004, DEchelbarg typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

27) From: DEchelbarg
In a message dated 4/29/2004 10:07:34 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
alchemist writes:
Thank you,  I'll take all advice I can get.  I'm doing okay with it, but 
notice that there is a fair amount of uneveness in the grounds -- will this go 
away when it breaks in a bit?  Or is this due to the top nut moving?
Dave Echelbarger 
Let me just say what I do.  Turn the nut fully CCW until the burrs lock.  I 
turn about 1/4 CW for espresso.  The burrs still just rub.  I turn another 
1/4-1/2 for drip.  Also, don't forget a drop of locktight on the threads or the 
nut will tend to drift in the course of one grinding.  Oh, I also have marked my 
nut with a sharpie so I know where it is.

28) From: Brian Kamnetz
I received my new Zassenhaus grain mill just the other day and haven't had 
time to play with it. I make press pot coffee. Would one turn clockwise 
from lockup be a good place to start with the grain mill, do you think?
Thanks,
brian
At 10:06 PM 4/29/2004 -0400, you wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: AlChemist John
I did find a break in period was required.  But if your nut is moving when 
you grind, that will definitely make your end product quite uneven.
BTW, I have to say I was surprised by the number of off list responses I 
received about the last line of my original response.  It was unintended 
but I am glad I could make a few people laugh. :-)
Sometime around 08:15 AM 4/29/2004, DEchelbarg typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

30) From: Johnny Kent
I missed that word play first time around... LOL ...and you just made it
even better
Thanks for the laugh. :-)))))
Johnny "the top nut moving" Kent
At 12:38 PM 4/29/2004 -0700, Alchemist John wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
response. 
<Snip>
uneveness in 
<Snip>
to the top nut moving?
<Snip>

31) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Dave. I adjust my Zass this way. I turn the adjusting screw CCw until =
the burrs lock up. I then go CW just short of 1/2 turn for espresso, and =
another 1/2 turn for drip.
RK

32) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<Snip>
but notice that there is a fair amount of unevenness in the grounds -- =
will this go away when it breaks in a bit?  Or is this due to the top =
nut moving?
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The top nut will move, I hold mine with my index finger. Some use =
loctite on the threads. The unevenness is most likely due to the =
adjusting nut moving.
RK

33) From: DVTO2
I just tried my new Zassenhaus and was unable to get the grind much past 
press pot. I tightened the screw underneath the crank all the way down. is there 
an adjustment somewhere that I am missing?
Dave T.

34) From: DEchelbarg
In a message dated 8/8/2004 6:16:36 PM Eastern Standard Time, DVTO2 
writes:
I just tried my new Zassenhaus and was unable to get the grind much past 
press pot. I tightened the screw underneath the crank all the way down. is 
there 
an adjustment somewhere that I am missing?
You should be able to lock the burs so they won't move when you tighten all 
the way down.  Can you?
Dave Echelbarger 

35) From: Angelo
On my Zass, tightening the screw DOWN (clockwise) makes for larger pieces. 
I know it seems counter-intuitive, but try going the other way until you 
can't turn it...
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

36) From: Barry Luterman
turning the screw clockwise makes for larger pieces
counter clockwise smaller

37) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Cant do that on mine

38) From: AlChemist John
So what does happen if you turn the nut fully counter clockwise?
Sometime around 04:25 PM 8/8/2004, Barry Luterman typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

39) From: javafool
I have to turn the dial on mine anti-clockwise for a finer grind :(
I still use a rubber band someone here mentioned to keep the grind from
drifting.
java

40) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
They don't lock and still produce a grind. The grind is a bit coarser =
than espresso

41) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Time stops and coffee ceases to matter...
Gene Smith
leaving most nuts unturned, in Houston

42) From: Terry Stockdale
Reminds me of a John D. MacDonald book called "The Girl, The Gold Watch, 
and Everything."
Terry
At 08:13 PM 8/9/2004, you wrote:
<Snip>
Terry Stockdale --  Baton Rouge, LA
 http://www.terrystockdale.com

43) From: Ben Treichel
Terry Stockdale wrote:
<Snip>
Didn't that get turned into a movie?
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

44) From: Terry Stockdale
You're right;  I'd forgotten that.  Darn it, I'd been successful in 
forgetting that movie;  now you reminded me.  That is definitely not one to 
rent.  The book was pretty fun, though.
Terry
At 08:58 PM 8/9/2004, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>

45) From: Terry Stockdale
You're right;  I'd forgotten that.  Darn it, I'd been successful in 
forgetting that movie;  now you reminded me.  That is definitely not one to 
bother renting.  The book was pretty fun, though.
Terry
At 08:58 PM 8/9/2004, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>

46) From: Mark Tosiello
Ok, I REALLY liked this one......marvelous answer!
Mark
-------
If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first...Invent the
Universe
                                             -Dr. Carl E. Sagan
All outgoing E-Mail from this address is scanned for viruses by AVG
Anti-Virus.

47) From: Oaklandguy
Good memory, Ben.  Made into a made-for-tv movie in 1980.  Starred Robert
Hays and Pam Dawber with a nice cast of B actors.  Please don't ask how I
remember this triviata.  Poor, lost brain cells!
Brent

48) From: Ben Treichel
Terry Stockdale wrote:
<Snip>
I think thats why I remebered it. A classic like 'attack of ther killer 
tomatos'
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

49) From: AlChemist John
I see the topic drifted a bit.  I think you actually might have a defective 
model if the burrs do not touch. Mis-set in the factory.   Get in touch 
with Tom or Maria.
Sometime around 05:29 PM 8/9/2004, Barry Luterman typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

50) From: DEchelbarg
In a message dated 8/10/2004 9:21:35 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
alchemist writes:
I see the topic drifted a bit.  I think you actually might have a defective 
model if the burrs do not touch. Mis-set in the factory.   Get in touch with 
Tom or Maria.
Agreed, I had one not long ago where the bur was off.  It produced a nice 
grind when I hooked my finger around the shaft and pulled it toward me.  The new 
one worked very nicely.  Point is, they aren't all perfect. Can't understand 
that it won't lock up -- or nearly -- are the burs touching at all?
Dave E

51) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I sent this to Alchemist John off list but then decided to post it on =
list. Mea Culpa
John thanks a lot. It's my screw up. The Zass is relatively new and =
stiff. I thought the nut was fully turned. I tried it again this AM =
after receiving your answer. Sure enough with a little forcing the nut =
turned almost a full revolution. The Zass now performs as it should. I =
was afraid to force the nut before. But once I thought I was returning =
it any way I figured I try. Once again you have proven to be a valued =
member of the list.
Barry

52) From: Jean
Oooh, another Travis fan, eh?
Jean  :~)

53) From: AlChemist John
I am glad I could help.  Your Zass should last you years and years (and 
build those triceps nicely :-)
Sometime around 10:48 AM 8/10/2004, Barry Luterman typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

54) From: Sean Cary
Anyone with a Zass Turkish - does it have any distinctive Zass markings?
Just got mine (ripped off oh s/h - but I really, really needed it) and
it does not have any distinctive markings.  The quality seems fairly
tight, few cosmetic marks around the top, but overall the tolerances
seem tight.  Figured out the workings, take off the top cover, pour in
beans and they collect in the bottom - grind adjusted by the screw.
Does anyone have a rough adjustment/turn number to start off with?  I
am doing French Press in a travel mug, has a fairly large screen
compared to my Bodums at home - but I deal with the smaller "grit"
that comes through with the whirly blade.  Would like a turn all the
way to the left then back off X number of turns for a rough start...
I don't have time/beans to really experiment with.
Hope some of you can help...
Back in Fallujah...safe and sound for now, but had some "interesting"
experiences the last few weeks

55) From: miKe mcKoffee
The bottom (grinds catcher) on my Turkish Zass' has a Lion w/umbrella,
"ZASSENHAUS" below it in straight line and "MADE IN GERMANY" below that
curved matching the curve of the cylinder. FWIW purchased mine from SM '01.
Grinding for press I used about one full turn from locked, 3 minute
infusion.
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

56) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-31-945648107
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MIne has a lion and the "Zassenhaus" name on the bottom of the  
grounds chamber.
On Sep 13, 2007, at 7:48 AM, Sean Cary wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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MIne has a lion and the "Zassenhaus" name on the bottom of the grounds =
chamber.
On Sep 13, 2007, at 7:48 AM, Sean Cary =
wrote:
Anyone with a Zass Turkish - = does it have any distinctive Zass markings? Just got mine = (ripped off oh s/h - but I really, really needed it) andit does not have any distinctive markings.  The quality seems = fairlytight, few cosmetic marks around = the top, but overall the tolerancesseem = tight.  Figured out the = workings, take off the top cover, pour inbeans = and they collect in the bottom - grind adjusted by the screw. Does = anyone have a rough adjustment/turn number to start off with?  Iam doing French Press in a travel mug, has a fairly = large screencompared to my Bodums at home - = but I deal with the smaller "grit"that comes = through with the whirly blade.  = Would like a turn all theway to the = left then back off X number of turns for a rough start...I don't have time/beans to really experiment = with. Hope some of you can help... Back in = Fallujah...safe and sound for now, but had some "interesting"experiences the last few weekshomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-31-945648107--

57) From: Larry English
My Zass Turkish, recently purchased from SM, has no markings indicating
Zassenhaus or German-made - at least none that I can find.  Seems to work
just fine.
Larry
On 9/13/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

58) From: Sandy Andina
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Forgot to mention the umbrella on mine, too.  But not all Zass  
products have that--my wooden peppermills just have "Zassenhaus--Made  
in Germany" on the plastic rings surrounding the underside of the burrs.
On Sep 13, 2007, at 1:05 PM, Larry English wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-32-947089305
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Forgot to mention the umbrella on mine, too.  But not all Zass =
products have that--my wooden peppermills just have "Zassenhaus--Made in =
Germany" on the plastic rings surrounding the underside of the =
burrs.
On Sep 13, 2007, at 1:05 PM, Larry English =
wrote:
My Zass Turkish, recently purchased from SM, has no = markings indicating Zassenhaus or German-made - at least none that I can = find.  Seems to work just fine. Larry On 9/13/07, miKe = mcKoffee <mcKona> = wrote: The bottom (grinds catcher) on my Turkish Zass' has a Lion = w/umbrella, "ZASSENHAUS" below it in straight line and "MADE IN = GERMANY" below that curved matching the curve of the cylinder. FWIW = purchased mine from SM '01. Grinding for press I used about one = full turn from locked, 3 minute infusion. Pacific Northwest = Gathering VI http://home.comcast.ne=t/~mckona/PNWGVI.htm Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee www.mcKonaKoffee.com URL to = Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://www.mckoffee.com/= Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To = know I must first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each = Personal enlightenment found exploring the many divergent foot steps = of Those who have gone before. Sweet Maria's List - Searchable = Archives http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/>

59) From: John Brown
go to the show hall and ask the cooks for some rice, try that first. it 
will give you some idea how close you are, and clean the machine at the 
same time.  or ask for some coffee grounds.  if they are the same size 
as they were twenty some years ago then you should be able to regrind 
them in the Turkish Zass.
Sean Cary wrote:
<Snip>

60) From: Sean Cary
I found some beans at the coffee "MESS" - that the rest of the folks
here drink from.
I am somewhat dissapointed by the range of grind - and the consistency
so far.  It does a bit better then the whirly...but has a huge range
of grind.
The spring on the grind adjuster barely allows for a two - two and
half turn back before it is too loose...  I have to play, made two
mugs today,..lots of fines in the first...more then the whirly.
second cup at 2 min right now...pressing at 3 min.
More experimenting, hell I have until Feb to get it nailed down.
Sean
On 9/14/07, John Brown  wrote:
<Snip>

61) From: Aaron
sean the sass turkish mill does not take much adjustment at all.  Bring 
the burrs down until they are touching pretty good,  they are really 
singing when you turn the handle and might even offer a tad resistance.
now, back it off maybe 1/8 turn until the resistance stops and they are 
just rubbing a bit.   Run some beans through it (no you don't have to 
grind half a pound at a shot) and make SMALL incremental adjustments 
until you get the grind right.  By small I mean 1/8 turns or so, it does 
not take much to make a big difference.  All the experimental grounds, 
don't waste them, they work just fine in a swiss gold or drip pot.
Aaron

62) From: Sean Cary
TEST - have not received an e-mail from the list... Anyone out there??
On 9/14/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

63) From: Joseph Robertson
Sean,
Did you get this email. Test back to you.
JoeR
On 9/16/07, Sean Cary  wrote:
<Snip>

64) From: Sean Cary
I did - just after finishing my first cup of coffee for the day - a
Costa Rican Naranjo roasted by Tom (I subscribed to the 2lbs every 2
weeks delivery plan)...
The change in using the Zassenhaus has been noticeable!
Sean
In Fallujah where is was actually chilly walking to work this morning!
On 9/19/07, Joseph Robertson  wrote:
<Snip>

65) From: Tim Carter
Took the red-eye back to Atlanta from Honolulu, drove past all the 
tornado damage downtown, and fired up the HG/BM.  Roasted 8 oz each of  
El Salvador Orange Bourbon (City+) and IMV (City).  With a couple of 
days rest, I'm getting ready to try the El Salvador in my first French 
press pot (left my filter holder down in Hawaii).  After trying out all 
the different Zassenhaus models (thanks, Barrry), I settled on the knee 
mill and it was waiting when I got back.  I moved it down to its 
coarsest setting and cranked away.  Looked pretty even, but finer 
looking than expected.  Brewed up a good-tasting cup with a little 
sludge at the bottom.  I don't know if it is excessive; nothing to 
compare to.
I decided to see what the range was.  The tightest setting produces very 
fluffy results.  Back to coarsest: nice, even grind, but still finer 
that I would expect.  I compared to my wife's drip Folger's and it is 
definitely finer.  The total adjustment range on the knurled nut is 
slightly less than one full rotation.  From my read of Tom's Zass 
instructions, that seems less than I would expect.  Any thoughts?  I 
thought it would be wise to ask before doing any disassembly.
Thanks,
Tim
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66) From: Barry Luterman
It's just a little stiff don't be afraid to use a little force it will turn
more. When are you coming back to Hawaii?
On Mon, Mar 17, 2008 at 7:15 AM, Tim Carter  wrote:
<Snip>
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67) From: Tim Carter
Thanks, I'm holding it now.  I can turn it  a little farther against the 
upper nylon washer (finer) if I push hard.  It looks like it is 
metal-to-metal on the lower end (coarser).  I'll keep working it and see 
if it loosens up.  I'm headed back to Hawaii on 3/24 and will be 
bringing it with me.
Tim
Barry Luterman wrote:
<Snip>
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68) From: Aaron
Some of the new zass' can be a little tight.  Obviously you can't get 
much more on the fine end of the spectrum but dont be afraid to put a 
bit of muscle into it and try for  more turns on the coarse end.  Unless 
you get really insane and use a vise grips or something you really won't 
be able to hurt it by hand loosening it.  Sometimes they need a 'back 
and forth' a few times to get them to loosen up a bit.   That's a good 
thing actually, as the zass' sometimes tend to have a bad habit of 
walking when in use and you need some goop to hold them at the setting 
you choose.
Aaron
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