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Topic: Additional Hottop Info From SCAA (6 msgs / 192 lines)
1) From: Bob Yellin
Rick Ferris asked:
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that
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have
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trouble
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 to
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Decided to start a new thread with the correct subject.
I doubt that they re-calibrated the Hottop for this workshop. In fact, =
even
at a setting of "2",  they manually ejected the beans when the beeps
signaling the end of the roast started to sound. I have no idea how to
calibrate it but another part of my discussion with them had to do with
ways to vary the profile. Since the program can't be changed, they
suggested using a lighter or heavier loads for shortening or lengthening
the roast time and in that way, changing the basic profile of the roast
(not the program, of course). 
But even more informative was the fact that they agreed that I wouldn't
damage the roaster by using a variac and lowering the voltage if I want =
to
stretch the time between first and second crack (which I do quite often).
But they were a bit surprised when I told them that I have sometimes =
taken
the voltage down as low as 90 volts. They also said that it wouldn't =
damage
the roaster to *raise* the voltage a few volts to speed things up but =
they
wouldn't say what a *few* was. I've raised the voltage as well, on =
occasion
but not much and I'm not recommending this for anyone else.  
Bob Yellin

2) From: Ben Treichel
Bob Yellin wrote:
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Actually I remember seeing them running the roaster empty (with the heat 
on) before we did the comparision roasts. Didn't think much about it at 
the time, but now it seems worth mentioning.

3) From: Jeff Wikstrom
I find that strange that they say it won't damage the roaster at all.  I've
always been under the impression that AC motors should be run at their
intended voltage.  I don't think it would hurt the heating coils, but
wouldn't the motor life shorten by even a little bit?

4) From: Wandering John
On Wed, 2004-04-28 at 08:55, Jeff Wikstrom wrote:
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I doubt that the elevated voltage would effect the motor nearly as much
as being exposed to the ambient temperatures that exist in the housing.
Most motors are very tolerant of voltage variations.  I'd be more
concerned with the voltage comparators for the temp feedback.
John - who was such a great engineer that I went into the ministy

5) From: Bob Yellin
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I've
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Dunno...but I run the A.C. fan motor on two totally different hot air
roasters at voltages from 90V to 130V with no problems and have been =
doing
so on one of them quite often for more than a year. I called their =
(Hottop)
office in California about a year ago and asked about the Hottop voltage
range (I was concerned about the electronic control chip) and they told =
me
that a range of 115 to 125 is acceptable. At the SCAA conference, these
guys were, I believe, design engineers.
Bob
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often).
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taken
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damage
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they
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occasion
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unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

6) From: Jeff Wikstrom
It's probably the lack of load on the motor.  It's one thing to lower
voltage on a fan and another on a motor used for lifting.  My only
experience is with the latter.
Jeff Wikstrom


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