HomeRoast Digest


Topic: My Cup Runneth Over. . . (38 msgs / 1311 lines)
1) From: Jean
It's a beautiful Saturday morning - the fragrance of roses and alyssum =
fill the air, Sophie is busy with her new chew toy, and I have a =
wonderful cup of SM's Sulawesi Toraja.  
::sigh::
Jean  :~)

2) From: Jeff Wikstrom
Well, I started the day with a Cap, then some vacuum, I'm moving onto a moka
pot.  The jitters are a little edgy right now, but I'm alternating between
some yummy buttery Nica & a full bodied Yemen that I won in the tradition
from Charles Haynes, both soo good and soo different from each other.  What
a way to waste a day!  I just need to roast Les's Uganda/Rwanda blend and
the day will be full!
Jeff

3) From: Lesley Albjerg
Jean,
 
I had a meeting at church and made the mistake of having a cup of church coffee.  When I got home I brerwed a vac pot of Mama Cata from Panama.  One forgets how good us homeroasters have it.  The contrast can not be put into words!!!!
 
Les 
Jean  wrote:
It's a beautiful Saturday morning - the fragrance of roses and alyssum fill the air, Sophie is busy with her new chew toy, and I have a wonderful cup of SM's Sulawesi Toraja. 
::sigh::
Jean :~)---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
SBC Yahoo! - Internet access at a great low price.

4) From: Sue Stevenson
I know exactly what you mean! I'm trying to figure out what to do about coffee at work. I work in an emergency room and pretty  much drink coffee all day.The problem is, so does everyone else. All the ER staff, plus all the folks from x-ray, lab, and of course the patients family.  Our hospital provides a Bunn that always needs a good cleaning but never gets it until the head is plugged (alot of minerals in the water). They also provide bags of maxwell house coffee.  I would like to be able to make some of my home roasted coffee at work. I would like to have friends and coworkers drink it also but not 100% of the time, after all - I couldn't keep up  - I am roasting with a FR+, and I couldn't afford it! I have to get a grinder and also figure out what brewing method I should for work. I'm not sure why ( cleaning might help) but every time I tried making my coffee in that Bunn is tastes really awful! Sue
 
Lesley Albjerg  wrote:
Jean,
 
I had a meeting at church and made the mistake of having a cup of church coffee.  When I got home I brerwed a vac pot of Mama Cata from Panama.  One forgets how good us homeroasters have it.  The contrast can not be put into words!!!!
 
Les 
.

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
I don't know, Sue, I'm afraid you may be setting yourself up for bad 
things. It's kind of you to think of your co-workers' well being when it 
comes to coffee, but I question how many people will be happy going back 
and forth between good, freshly-roasted and freshly ground coffee that you 
supply and the Maxwell House that the hospital supplies. Maxwell House 
might be ok for people who have never experienced good coffee, but "you can 
never go home again."
Good luck, I hope you figure out something satisfactory.
Brian
At 02:13 PM 5/15/2004 -0700, you wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Lesley Albjerg
Sue,
I work in a hospital too.  I wouldn't drink the ER coffee at ours either.  On the other hand, ICU has a nice drip machine and they bring in good beans and grind just before brewing.  They do make a drinkable cup.  The Bunn is a great machine.  It needs to be cleaned really good and have filtered water used to brew.  Bring in some really good home roast and then get the Docs to give to a Hottop or RK drum fund for you!
 
Les
Sue Stevenson  wrote:
I know exactly what you mean! I'm trying to figure out what to do about coffee at work. I work in an emergency room and pretty  much drink coffee all day.The problem is, so does everyone else. All the ER staff, plus all the folks from x-ray, lab, and of course the patients family.  Our hospital provides a Bunn that always needs a good cleaning but never gets it until the head is plugged (alot of minerals in the water). They also provide bags of maxwell house coffee.  I would like to be able to make some of my home roasted coffee at work. I would like to have friends and coworkers drink it also but not 100% of the time, after all - I couldn't keep up  - I am roasting with a FR+, and I couldn't afford it! I have to get a grinder and also figure out what brewing method I should for work. I'm not sure why ( cleaning might help) but every time I tried making my coffee in that Bunn is tastes really awful! Sue
 
Lesley Albjerg  wrote:
Jean,
 
I had a meeting at church and made the mistake of having a cup of church coffee.  When I got home I brerwed a vac pot of Mama Cata from Panama.  One forgets how good us homeroasters have it.  The contrast can not be put into words!!!!
 
Les 
.
---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
SBC Yahoo! - Internet access at a great low price.

7) From: Wandering John
A high quality steel thermos will get you through the first half of the 
day.  Then a pour over cup and boiling water supply for the last half. 
Worked for me when I was IT-ing.   The DP folks used to wait for me to 
pour my first cup to present me with any real problems - I took it 
better. 
On Saturday 15 May 2004 04:13 pm, Sue Stevenson wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I see that I have all I need, when I am able to distinguish what I 
merely want

8) From: Sue Stevenson
Les, 
Oooooh, good idea. I know a couple of the docs do currently buy coffee from a local coffee roaster. I'll have to get them drinking my coffee and then get our ER equiped properly. Maybe by Christmas...................
Lesley Albjerg  wrote:Sue,
I work in a hospital too.  I wouldn't drink the ER coffee at ours either.  On the other hand, ICU has a nice drip machine and they bring in good beans and grind just before brewing.  They do make a drinkable cup.  The Bunn is a great machine.  It needs to be cleaned really good and have filtered water used to brew.  Bring in some really good home roast and then get the Docs to give to a Hottop or RK drum fund for you!
 
Les
Sue Stevenson  wrote:
I know exactly what you mean! I'm trying to figure out what to do about coffee at work. I work in an emergency room and pretty  much drink coffee all day.The problem is, so does everyone else. All the ER staff, plus all the folks from x-ray, lab, and of course the patients family.  Our hospital provides a Bunn that always needs a good cleaning but never gets it until the head is plugged (alot of minerals in the water). They also provide bags of maxwell house coffee.  I would like to be able to make some of my home roasted coffee at work. I would like to have friends and coworkers drink it also but not 100% of the time, after all - I couldn't keep up  - I am roasting with a FR+, and I couldn't afford it! I have to get a grinder and also figure out what brewing method I should for work. I'm not sure why ( cleaning might help) but every time I tried making my coffee in that Bunn is tastes really awful! Sue
 
Lesley Albjerg  wrote:
Jean,
 
I had a meeting at church and made the mistake of having a cup of church coffee.  When I got home I brerwed a vac pot of Mama Cata from Panama.  One forgets how good us homeroasters have it.  The contrast can not be put into words!!!!
 
Les 
.
---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
SBC Yahoo! - Internet access at a great low price.

9) From: Sue Stevenson
Hi John, That is a good idea. I've been meaning to comment on that. I bought one of the Nisson 1liter thermos bottles from SM's. I can't believe how good that thermos is! I drive almost an hour to get to work. I thought I could drink that on the way but its just to hot! So I bring it to drink at work, and use a regular travel mug for on the way. That coffee stays hot for a long time!! 
 
I have a beautiful cocobolo (sp?) wood  pour over that I got in Costa Rica last year. I could buy a water boiler and hide it in my office - keep it for myself and a few select others! Sue
Wandering John  wrote:
A high quality steel thermos will get you through the first half of the 
day. Then a pour over cup and boiling water supply for the last half. 
Worked for me when I was IT-ing. The DP folks used to wait for me to 
pour my first cup to present me with any real problems - I took it 
better. 
On Saturday 15 May 2004 04:13 pm, Sue Stevenson wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I see that I have all I need, when I am able to distinguish what I 
merely want

10) From: Sue Stevenson
Yeh, It's kind of like chocolate. You really want the good stuff, then you have to settle for a snickers! Sue
Brian Kamnetz  wrote:I don't know, Sue, I'm afraid you may be setting yourself up for bad things. It's kind of you to think of your co-workers' well being when it comes to coffee, but I question how many people will be happy going back and forth between good, freshly-roasted and freshly ground coffee that you supply and the Maxwell House that the hospital supplies. Maxwell House might be ok for people who have never experienced good coffee, but "you can never go home again." 
Good luck, I hope you figure out something satisfactory.
Brian
At 02:13 PM 5/15/2004 -0700, you wrote:
I know exactly what you mean! I'm trying to figure out what to do about coffee at work. I work in an emergency room and pretty  much drink coffee all day.The problem is, so does everyone else. All the ER staff, plus all the folks from x-ray, lab, and of course the patients family.  Our hospital provides a Bunn that always needs a good cleaning but never gets it until the head is plugged (alot of minerals in the water). They also provide bags of maxwell house coffee.  I would like to be able to make some of my home roasted coffee at work. I would like to have friends and coworkers drink it also but not 100% of the time, after all - I couldn't keep up  - I am roasting with a FR+, and I couldn't afford it! I have to get a grinder and also figure out what brewing method I should for work. I'm not sure why ( cleaning might help) but every time I tried making my coffee in that Bunn is tastes really awful! Sue
 
Lesley Albjerg  wrote: 
   Jean, 
    
   I had a meeting at church and made the mistake of having a cup of church coffee.  When I got home I brerwed a vac pot of Mama Cata from Panama.  One forgets how good us homeroasters have it.  The contrast can not be put into words!!!! 
    
   Les 
   . 

11) From: Wandering John
On Saturday 15 May 2004 05:15 pm, Sue Stevenson wrote:
<Snip>
A FEW are the key words!  I actually loaded both BUNN machines with home 
roasted (Kenyan AA) One morning at the bank and it was completely gone 
in five minutes.  Nobody was willing to pay for the home roast but 
EVERYBODY urged me to do it again :O)

12) From: Bill Martin
On May 15, 2004, at 12:33 PM, Wandering John wrote:
<Snip>
I did the same with KONA at HEB when I was still in San Antonio.  Went 
through a whole pound of that in less than 30 minutes.  Used up several 
pots full on the Pro Bunn  we had.  The aroma wafted down the halls, 
and even people who don't usually drink coffee, were drinking coffee.
Bill
<Snip>
When I was kidnapped, my parents snapped into action. They rented out
my room.  -- Woody Allen

13) From: Wandering John
On Saturday 15 May 2004 05:59 pm, Bill Martin wrote:
<Snip>
You are a more generous person than me - I felt pretty good with just 
exposing them to fresh coffee.  I can imagine the excitement if I'd put 
in Kona!
-- 
I see that I have all I need, when I am able to distinguish what I 
merely want

14) From: Sue Stevenson
ok, you guys are really scaring me off now, maybe I should just stick with my thermos (or two) and be quiet! Sue
Bill Martin  wrote:
On May 15, 2004, at 12:33 PM, Wandering John wrote:
<Snip>
I did the same with KONA at HEB when I was still in San Antonio. Went 
through a whole pound of that in less than 30 minutes. Used up several 
pots full on the Pro Bunn we had. The aroma wafted down the halls, 
and even people who don't usually drink coffee, were drinking coffee.
Bill
<Snip>
When I was kidnapped, my parents snapped into action. They rented out
my room. -- Woody Allen

15) From: Bill Martin
On May 15, 2004, at 1:59 PM, Sue Stevenson wrote:
<Snip>
If you pop the top, and the aroma wafts around a bit, people you didn't 
know you knew will be coming by your office.
Bill

16) From: Sue Stevenson
Yes, you're right. I know the minute my husband starts the coffee around here  I can smell it all the way upstairs!  What a wonderful aroma to wake up to!
 
Sue
Bill Martin  wrote:
On May 15, 2004, at 1:59 PM, Sue Stevenson wrote:
<Snip>
If you pop the top, and the aroma wafts around a bit, people you didn't 
know you knew will be coming by your office.
Bill

17) From: Jean
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Not that I think we should subject ourselves to bad coffee, but the good =
thing about those occasions when we can't politely avoid it is that it =
reminds us all over again how good we have it. 
Jean  :~)

18) From: Ed Needham
Sue, get a manual pourover (Melitta makes a good cheap one) and use the hot
water from the Bunn to brew with.  I grind mine at home for convenience and
put the grinds in a jar to bring to work.  I also use a thermos pot and keep
the good stuff at my desk (or wherever you have a private space).  When I
make a pot, I usually alert those who appreciate good coffee that I'll share
some.  Otherwise, some wisenheimer will dump the fresh pot I just made
because it 'didn't taste right'.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

19) From: Jeff Wikstrom
I share mine with office staff.  Our production staff likes burnt Yuban.
The smell in the morning is almost enough to make you forget that there is
such a thing as good coffee.  I've got everybody in the office unwilling to
drink the other stuff now!  
Jeff

20) From: Barbara Greenspon
--Apple-Mail-35--963871366
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Hi, Sue:  I don't know if this will be considered sacrilegious or not, =
but one way to solve the problem would be to buy the large vacuum 
bottle Sweet Maria's sells.  It is 1 liter and keeps my americanos hot =
for almost 24 hours -- not that I have let them sit that long.
When we were traveling, I made a liter's worth of press pot every 
morning, filled that thermos, and then made 2 different kinds and 
filled two small (18 oz.) thermoses (just like the big one but called 
"backpack" or "no spill" thermoses, also available at Sweet Maria's.  
It was fun to stop at a rest area where there might be a *$ not even 
think about going in!  The taste was wonderful.  The only thing to be 
careful of is that it stays too hot and you have to beware!
On May 15, 2004, at 4:13 PM, Sue Stevenson wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-35--963871366
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
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	charsetO-8859-1
Comic Sans MSHi, Sue:  I don't know if this
will be considered sacrilegious or not, but one way to solve the
problem would be to buy the large vacuum bottle Sweet Maria's sells. 
It is 1 liter and keeps my americanos hot for almost 24 hours -- not
that I have let them sit that long.
When we were traveling, I made a liter's worth of press pot every
morning, filled that thermos, and then made 2 different kinds and
filled two small (18 oz.) thermoses (just like the big one but called
"backpack" or "no spill" thermoses, also available at Sweet Maria's. 
It was fun to stop at a rest area where there might be a
*$ not even think about going in!  The taste was
wonderful.  The only thing to be careful of is that it stays too hot
and you have to beware!
On May 15, 2004, at 4:13 PM, Sue Stevenson wrote:
I know exactly what you mean! I'm trying to figure out what
to do about coffee at work. I work in an emergency room and pretty 
much drink coffee all day.The problem is, so does everyone else. All
the ER staff, plus all the folks from x-ray, lab, and of course the
patients family.  Our hospital provides a Bunn that always needs a
good cleaning but never gets it until the head is plugged (alot of
minerals in the water). =
--Apple-Mail-35--963871366--

21) From: Wandering John
On Sunday 16 May 2004 09:25 am, Barbara Greenspon wrote:
<Snip>
Not Sue but - you could also fill the thermos with espresso and then 
blend it into Americanos at the office (providing you have hot water 
available) and get about 4 times the amount of drinking out of the 
thermos. 
John - - 
I see that I have all I need, when I am able to distinguish what I 
merely want

22) From: Richard Weinberg
i do it with java moka at work ...richard

23) From: Ed Needham
Quite a feat.  Must be a bunch of very open minded people who are not slaves
to routine.  Oh, and it must be pretty decent coffee too!
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

24) From: Jeff Wikstrom
You just have to try good coffee once to want it again, and for a week or
two to never go back.

25) From: Ed Needham
My experience is quite a bit different.  Most who have never had great
coffee, and are set in their ways, will find coffee with true flavor "way too
strong!" or "wow, that is different." and go back to their tasteless office
stuff.  I used to try to get my dad to drink my homeroast, but he would
politely sip it, say how good it was, but the beans and grinder I left for
him would still be unused a few days or a week later.  He continued to use,
and prefer some generic large can, preground, store-bought stuff.
I've actually had a whole pot of some pretty incredible brew tossed out by a
co-worker who thought it tasted 'funny'.  She brewed a pot of stale,
preground office coffee to replace it and was happy.
My mother in law loves to drink my coffee when she comes over for dinner or
to visit, but drinks some sort of preground at home.  Offers to send her home
with my beans are declined most of the time.  Some single origin coffees are
a bit too unique for the average palate.  Even specialty beer is declined by
many for 'Miller Light' (bleeeeeccchhhhh) partly due to the same reasons.  It
has flavor and has a unique taste.
I think I roast a decent bean, but getting someone to change and messing with
their coffee routine is tough.  I don't go crazy when people reject my
homeroast for preground floor sweepings.  I've even been able to overcome
thinking less of them for it .  I just brew the beans and share with
those who want it.  I know it's good, and that's enough.  Those who regularly
get beans from me think it's good too.  Being a hard nosed coffee evangelist
is useless at best.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

26) From: Jeff Wikstrom
You are right.  I have two in the office that love it.  The other one is
slowly coming over (he Yuban that has been cooking all day).  My wife's
grandparents choke every time they drink good stuff, although they
constantly complain about the can.  My dad seems to enjoy my coffee, but
goes home to his week crap with French vanilla creamer in it.  You are right
about the beer.  My brother in law would just rather have his Coors.  It's
sad when you have 30 micro brews at the grocery store...you could literally
try something new every time, and they go for that full rack of blek.
Life's just unfair.  All the same, it is worth it.  I've got a few converts
and am happy with my little flock. ;)
Jeff

27) From: Lesley Albjerg
Ed 
When I serve homeroast to people who are "can" drinkers, I ususally add 1/3 -1/2 hot water to my vac brewed coffee.  I have always had raves about how good it is.  I never offer to supply coffee anymore.  We had a family home from PNG and they raved about how they loved coffee.  I roasted up some nice PNG for them.  They waited two months to grind and brew it.  That is abuse in my book!
 
Les
Ed Needham  wrote:
My experience is quite a bit different. Most who have never had great
coffee, and are set in their ways, will find coffee with true flavor "way too
strong!" or "wow, that is different." and go back to their tasteless office
stuff. I used to try to get my dad to drink my homeroast, but he would
politely sip it, say how good it was, but the beans and grinder I left for
him would still be unused a few days or a week later. He continued to use,
and prefer some generic large can, preground, store-bought stuff.
I've actually had a whole pot of some pretty incredible brew tossed out by a
co-worker who thought it tasted 'funny'. She brewed a pot of stale,
preground office coffee to replace it and was happy.
My mother in law loves to drink my coffee when she comes over for dinner or
to visit, but drinks some sort of preground at home. Offers to send her home
with my beans are declined most of the time. Some single origin coffees are
a bit too unique for the average palate. Even specialty beer is declined by
many for 'Miller Light' (bleeeeeccchhhhh) partly due to the same reasons. It
has flavor and has a unique taste.
I think I roast a decent bean, but getting someone to change and messing with
their coffee routine is tough. I don't go crazy when people reject my
homeroast for preground floor sweepings. I've even been able to overcome
thinking less of them for it . I just brew the beans and share with
those who want it. I know it's good, and that's enough. Those who regularly
get beans from me think it's good too. Being a hard nosed coffee evangelist
is useless at best.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

28) From: Spencer W. Thomas
My wife took a mug-full to her officemate.  He said that in his opinion 
it was a crime that I wasn't selling it!  Made me feel pretty good.
=Spencer
Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Tom Ulmer
Most folks I know do not care for single origin coffee even though most
notice a freshness. I haven't found anyone who didn't favor my blends. Part
of my enjoyment from roasting is trying to match my handiwork with someone's
taste.
I have also found that some (most) people simply do not care to go through
much trouble to please their palate. To us as roasters, the simple act of
grinding seems inconsequential in relation to the efforts already put forth.
To others, measuring scoops out of a can and adding the proper amount of
water is making coffee.
My father greatly enjoys the coffee I make - when I make it. So I brew
enough to drop an insulated carafe off for him. The carafe always comes back
polished and squeaky clean with many thanks.

30) From: Allen Marsalis
At 06:53 AM 5/17/2004 -0700, Jeff Wikstrom wrote:
 >You are right.  I have two in the office that love it.  The other one is
 >slowly coming over (he Yuban that has been cooking all day).  My wife's
 >grandparents choke every time they drink good stuff, although they
 >constantly complain about the can.  My dad seems to enjoy my coffee, but
 >goes home to his week crap with French vanilla creamer in it.  You are right
 >about the beer.  My brother in law would just rather have his Coors.  It's
 >sad when you have 30 micro brews at the grocery store...you could literally
 >try something new every time, and they go for that full rack of blek.
 >Life's just unfair.  All the same, it is worth it.  I've got a few converts
 >and am happy with my little flock. ;)
 >
I am all alone except for you guys..  Pretty sad isn't it?  ;-)
There are quite a few homebrewers that I know in these parts, but
I've never even met a coffee roaster before.  I used to homebrew
many years ago until we had kids and my wife couldn't stand the
smell while pregnant (among other things)
IMHO, homebrew is to Miller, what homeroast is to Folgers..
Allen
am

31) From: Ed Needham
Exactly the kind of thing I'm talking about.  My one of my friends and his
wife still give us gift baskets containing preground flavored coffee because
they think I'm such a coffee nut.  It's not that they are rude and cruel,
it's the perception that the flavored coffees are somehow the best.  Neither
drink coffee.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

32) From: Ron L.
I'm sure that some of the coffee I've given to people is still sitting around, too.  I try not to think about it...  I try to give coffee only to folks with a grinder...  My neighbor gets some everytime I roast since she always comments on the coffee within a couple of days.  My parents get some decaf once in a while, but I have to grind it for them.  I guess I can make allowances for them... 
 
...ron
Lesley Albjerg  wrote:
Ed 
When I serve homeroast to people who are "can" drinkers, I ususally add 1/3 -1/2 hot water to my vac brewed coffee.  I have always had raves about how good it is.  I never offer to supply coffee anymore.  We had a family home from PNG and they raved about how they loved coffee.  I roasted up some nice PNG for them.  They waited two months to grind and brew it.  That is abuse in my book!
 
Les
Ed Needham  wrote:
My experience is quite a bit different. Most who have never had great
coffee, and are set in their ways, will find coffee with true flavor "way too
strong!" or "wow, that is different." and go back to their tasteless office
stuff. I used to try to get my dad to drink my homeroast, but he would
politely sip it, say how good it was, but the beans and grinder I left for
him would still be unused a few days or a week later. He continued to use,
and prefer some generic large can, preground, store-bought stuff.
I've actually had a whole pot of some pretty incredible brew tossed out by a
co-worker who thought it tasted 'funny'. She brewed a pot of stale,
preground office coffee to replace it and was happy.
My mother in law loves to drink my coffee when she comes over for dinner or
to visit, but drinks some sort of preground at home. Offers to send her home
with my beans are declined most of the time. Some single origin coffees are
a bit too unique for the average palate. Even specialty beer is declined by
many for 'Miller Light' (bleeeeeccchhhhh) partly due to the same reasons. It
has flavor and has a unique taste.
I think I roast a decent bean, but getting someone to change and messing with
their coffee routine is tough. I don't go crazy when people reject my
homeroast for preground floor sweepings. I've even been able to overcome
thinking less of them for it . I just brew the beans and share with
those who want it. I know it's good, and that's enough. Those who regularly
get beans from me think it's good too. Being a hard nosed coffee evangelist
is useless at best.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

33) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
because
<Snip>
Neither
<Snip>
Obviously, the thing to do is to pass those preground flavored coffees along
to someone else who doesn't drink coffee.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

34) From: Jeff Wikstrom
Yessir.  Sorry about your loneliness.  I think we little ol' Rosburg area
people have it good.  There are four of us on the list out of a population
of 50,000 for the area that t'aint too bad.  I brought in some Moka Pot of
the Yemen Ismaili that Charles Haynes traditioned to me to share with the
office.  My installer & bookkeeper slurped it.  I gave some to my dad who
said, well it wasn't bitter, but it sure was strong!  Does anybody know of a
variety that comes out tasting like weak coffee with 4 oz. of French vanilla
in it? ;)
Jeff

35) From: Allen Marsalis
At 06:31 AM 5/18/2004 -0700, Jeff Wikstrom wrote:
 >I think we little ol' Rosburg area
 >people have it good.  There are four of us on the list out of a population
 >of 50,000 for the area that t'aint too bad.
Looks like 2 on this list out of my whole state!  (of course
we are on opposite ends)
Maybe it is time to share more homeroast and attract some
converts now that I'm divot-free.
Allen
am

36) From: Jeff Wikstrom
It's always time to convert people to good coffee!  Those poor grunts
wouldn't see the divots anyway! :)

37) From: Allen Marsalis
At 06:55 AM 5/21/2004 -0700, Jeff Wikstrom wrote:
 >It's always time to convert people to good coffee!  Those poor grunts
 >wouldn't see the divots anyway! :)
 >
hehe, I could always give it to them pre-ground like they
are used to!   (just joking)
Another problem I run into is that many people I know drink
decaf and I don't.  I may have to include some decaf beans in
my next order just to roast for others..
Allen
am

38) From: Jeff Wikstrom
Yeah, I don't have any in the stash.  Maybe next time.  But, the preground
thing can sometimes be a necessity.  Some poor saps just aren't equipped
properly to REALLY enjoy life.
Jeff


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