HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 5 lb drum roasting (was Jamaica roasting...) (10 msgs / 259 lines)
1) From: Johnny Kent
Ed,
One thing to consider is heat losses. Insulating the cover and maybe the
lower case of your bbq might reduce heat requirements and so allow low
initial temps.
For next to nothing (<$10) you can purchase a single roll of 4 inch thick
R13 insulation at HD or similar that will easily insulate more than you
need. For me that much insulation did the interior of the BBQ (but you'd
need outside)http://members.cox.net/fullcity/roastOrib.jpg and sound insulated my shop-vac and I still have a bunch left over.
On my bbq air-roaster that made all the difference. Could loft > 13.5 oz
greens with temps > 500F
whereas without insulation had trouble reaching 425 with 8 oz aloft
Attching it might present a challenge.
Johnny Kent
At 10:56 PM 5/24/2004 -0400, Ed wrote:
<Snip>
really kill  JBM with a high initial temperature and a short roast time.
You should use an initial environment temperature of less than 350 f , and
gently bring in up after 4 minutes or so, shooting for a total roast time
of no _less_ than 11 minutes or so.
<Snip>

2) From: Ed Needham
I'm thinking that a sheet of sheet metal, pop riveted to the top, over the
nomex or whatever insulating material would look good and remain functional
and durable.  I'd imagine that most of the heat loss is from openings around
the grill body and radiation from the top, so it's bound to help, especially
in the winter.  I don't want a material that's going to get crumbly and
disintegrate over a few months though.  Nomex is probably the best choice,
but is $$$.  Someone had access to Nomex at reasonable cost, but I forgot who
it was.
Having the box and flue attached to the back of my roaster reduced the heat
loss already, by plugging the 2" x 14" opening where the top and bottom grill
body meet.  It's worth a try.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

3) From: Ed Needham
Johnny,
After looking at your heat exchanger, sheet aluminum (as you're using) would
be a better choice than sheet steel as I suggested.  Much easier to work with
too.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

4) From: Dan Bollinger
I've been using ceramic matt insulation in my roaster.  Neat stuff!  =
Comes in 1/4" and 1" thicknesses, cuts with scissors, and isn't so loose =
as fiberglass wool.  
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5) From: Johnny Kent
That sounds like a great solution Dan.
Is that readily available and relatively inexpensive?
At 09:51 AM 5/25/2004 -0500, Dan wrote:
<Snip>
in 1/4" and 1" thicknesses, cuts with scissors, and isn't so loose as
fiberglass wool.  
<Snip>

6) From: Ed Needham
I have never heard of 'ceramic mat' insulation.  Where do you find this stuff
and what are it's characteristics?  Sounds like a good solution.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

7) From: David Lewis
At 1:12 AM -0400 5/26/04, Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>
Hi Ed,
Page 3256 of the McMaster-Carr catalog, at 
. 
There's high-temperature fiberglass as well as ceramic fiber blankets 
on that page. In both cases you'd have to use it with one of the 
aluminum jackets on page 3263 if it's outdoors. Of course in either 
case you'd want to be pretty careful to keep it out of the food.
Best,
	David
-- 
"The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by 
men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding."
Justice Louis Brandeis

8) From: Dan Bollinger
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this stuff
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Ed, Its high-tech stuff, I don't know if you can handle it.  ;) Just for =
fun I placed a piece of paper behind a 1/4" blanket of the stuff and put =
my propane torch to the insulation. It began to glow. After half a =
minute the paper wasn't even scorched.  :)  
I get it from where I also get my nichrome heating element wire and =
ceramic insulators: Infared Heaters, Inc. Great place, good service, low =
minimums.  Look under 'accessories' for the insulation. =http://www.infraredheaters.com/index.htmI replaced the fiberglass in my sample roaster with this stuff. I =
worried about coffee oil impregnating the insulation so I protected it =
with 0.015" aluminum sheet sold in lumber yards as flashing (cuts with =
scissors and has a low thermal mass I wanted for my PIDing).
I'm going to change the insulation on my Isomac boiler with the 1/4" =
blanket, too.

9) From: AlChemist John
Where did you get yours?  That sounds real handy.
Sometime around 07:51 AM 5/25/2004, Dan Bollinger typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

10) From: Ed Needham
Thanks Dan.
Looks like a good solution.  I'll cover it with a sheet of aluminum and pop
rivet the corners to the grill body.  It'll make the grill look even less
like a grill and more like a contraption.  Coooollll!!
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************


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