HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Old Beans? (17 msgs / 373 lines)
1) From: gin
yo ms:
most likely two or three years depending on how stored.
g

2) From:
I have been roasting for a while now, and in the past I have used various
methods -- stovetop in a frying pan, pop-corn poppers of various varieties,
and eventually I purchased an Alpenroast.  Its a nice unit, very convienent,
and seems to do pretty even roasts.
My current problem is that my roasts do not seem to have the 'smell' that I
am used to.  You know, that sort of oily yummy FRESH roast smell.
I am almost positive using this roaster that they used to, see I took a
break from roasting - almost a year now.  So I have a 5 pound bag of green
beans that have been sitting in the bag, in a box, on a shelf.   Recently I
started up roasting again, and am using those beans.   I think they still
taste pretty good, but they just dont have that nice pungent smell that they
used to after roasting...??
Any ideas?

3) From: Ed Needham
Depending on the bean, there is a window of opportunity to roast the beans
and bring out the best qualities in them.  Miss the window and the beans are
less than they could be.  Beans that are too old or stored improperly would
affect this window.  Roasting profile can also affect the beans.
Share a half pound of the beans with another (maybe local?) roaster and see
if they can bring out qualities that you are missing.  Try to roast them
differently and see if the aroma and taste come to life.
Buy a few pounds of another bean and see if things change a bit.
Welcome back.
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

4) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- sszretter wrote:
 
<Snip>
 When roasting older beans, there's always a loss of intensity
in the aroma. Sad, but that's how it goes. Fresh crop coffee
coffee will put that smile back on your face. I adjust my
roasting profile some when beans start to fade, by shortening
the roast time a little. That bumps up the acidity a tad and
keeps them interesting. The rich, pungent aroma is what I miss
the most in last year's beans.
  Charlie
=====
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5) From: DEchelbarg
In a message dated 5/30/2004 12:22:42 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
zapcafe writes:
When roasting older beans, there's always a loss of intensity
in the aroma. Sad, but that's how it goes. Fresh crop coffee
coffee will put that smile back on your face. I adjust my
roasting profile some when beans start to fade, by shortening
the roast time a little. That bumps up the acidity a tad and
keeps them interesting. The rich, pungent aroma is what I miss
the most in last year's beans.
  Charlie
What would you consider to be "old" beans?  What kind of shelf life can I 
expect for my growing green stash?
Dave Echelbarger

6) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- DEchelbarg wrote:
<Snip>
  Some beans keep better than others, and how they were dried,
stored and transported in the country of origin affects how well
they keep for us. Tom can usually tell which ones will be
keepers. How we store them can shorten or lengthen their shelf
life. My stash starts to fade slowly from dry storage
conditions. After one year from purchase, which is about 15 or
16 months since being dried at origin, the roasted aroma is
noticeably weaker, even though it tastes just fine. After a year
and a half the taste fades, too. I haven't had any start to
taste bad, even after 2 years in storage here.
 Very humid storage can make greens go bad fairly quickly.
They'll turn white, and start to develop off-tastes, and if they
ever get any mildew, throw them out.
 Vac sealing fresh greens keeps them nice for a long time-years,
according to Mike MkKoffe (where is that fellow?) The often
stated advice that greens need to "breath" doesn't hold up, IME,
if they have been dried to the proper moisture level of about
12%
  I've vac sealed some that were like new after one year, that's
as long as I could wait. I've tried freezing greens, and I do
not recommend it.
  Charlie
=====
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7) From: Douglas Boutell
I have had the same problem and the way I solved it
was to soak the beans in water for 5 min and do your
normal roasting.
I use my standard measuring cup for the roaster and
just fill it with water and let it soak. I started out
with a 20 min, then 10 min, and now a 5 min soak time.
There has been no change in flavor between the 20 to 5
min soak time. I dump the beans in the roaster without
drying them and start the roasting profile. There is
no need to readjust the fan speed to get the beans to
agitate because of the wetness of the beans.  The
surprise comes from the quality
of the flavor developed from the soaked beans. So far
there is no comparison for the flavors of the soaked
roasted beans and the same profile for the standard
non soaked beans. After Ben Treichel mentioned he was 
having the problem his Elida  I did a search at the
link below and can  you read what others have said
about soaking the beans or adding moisture back. My
results concur with what the others have tested back
in Dec of 03. I have started to soak all beans now and
the results are very good. http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/Topic9622.htmDoug Boutell
--- Ed Needham  wrote:
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8) From: DEchelbarg
Charlie,
I appreciate the info.  I bought a fair amount of Uganda Bugisu.  Just 
wondering how long you think that might last -- kind of went nuts over that coffee.  
I do have the ability to do vacuum packing.  Thanks for the info.
Dave Echelbarger

9) From: Oaxaca Charlie
--- Douglas Boutell  wrote:
<Snip>
 Since then I tried rehydrating some older Mexican and El
Salvador beans, and didn't get nearly as positive results like I
got from wetting some Yemen and Harrar I had just bought from
Tom which wasn't old, just too dry. The first cracks were more
distinctive, but that's about all I noticed with the older
centrals. I didn't do any more experementing, but I still
moisten some Yemen that I bought a sack of that is as dry as
Tom's was. I have some past crop Sumaran I could play with...
   Charlie
=====
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10) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Vac sealing greens is the way to go.IMO They will keep a very long time. =
Store in a dark, cool, dry place.after vac sealing.
RK

11) From: R.N.Kyle
 The first cracks were more
<Snip>
I agree Charlie. wetting old dry beans, helps first crack sound off nicely.
I didn't notice any improved taste though
RK

12) From: Douglas Boutell
--- Oaxaca Charlie  wrote:
<Snip>
Charlie,
I have played with about 10 diffferent beans and have
had good luck with the wet process roasting. I have
also played with different profiles and I have found
out that the profile effects the results much more
than I originally thought it would. It seems it is
profile sensitive to some degree. 
Original profile was  380 to 480 in 5 min and hold
till roast was finished produces the best results for
the FR+. I changed the profile  to 380 to 480 in 2 min
and hold til roast temp was reached and the result was
not what I had with the original profile.
I also changed the profile to 380 to 480 in 7 min and
hold til roast temp was reached and the results were
better than the faster profile but not what my
original profile was. I hope this helps you
Doug Boutell
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13) From: Ed Needham
I keep forgetting to try soaking the beans before I roast, but I don't see
how it would hurt.  Heck, Foolgers even steam cleans their beans .
*******************************
Ed Needham
To Absurdity and Beyond!
homeroaster ... d.o.t ... com
*******************************

14) From: MS
Are green that are 7 months old still good? What is the shelf life of green beans when kept properly?
 
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15) From: Les
If kept properly 2 years.  After the Mike McKoffee storage test, I am
shooting for 18 months or less, thus I am on major stash reduction.
Les
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 09:58:45 -0800 (PST), MS  wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: jason molinari
I just roasted some OLD beans last week, they were a
PNG purosa estate from '02! The coffee is good..i
don't rememebr what it tasted like when the greens
were fresh...but the coffee is good now.
jason
--- MS  wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: Ben Treichel
Les wrote:
<Snip>
I am also. My new Mantra is that coffee is seasonal, be glad for it, and 
then let it go and move on.


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