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Topic: A differrnt malange? (8 msgs / 192 lines)
1) From: Ben Treichel
Has anybody tried a melange roast by starting a roast and then adding 
more green 2 minutes later?
I started wondering about this because I kicked doff a batch at near 
capacity, but had too much left over to finish the sample. However when 
it started moving it looked like I could have added the extra 50 grams 
or so.
Ben

2) From: Jeff Wikstrom
Why not?

3) From: Jim Schulman
I used to do this with half-caf and robusta blends. Robusta 
first, then the really green caf, then the not so green caf, 
then the decaf. 
It works well for beans that roast differently early in the 
roast -- i.e. with differing water content. I don't think it 
works as well for beans that finish differently -- i.e. low 
grown and high grown beans.
Jim
On 2 Jun 2004 at 16:41, Ben Treichel wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
Hmmm, I suppose you could. My first reaction was it wouldn't work very well
based on the profile stages I use yet more thought leads me to believe you
may be on to a great idea. I'm a firm believer many greens yield the best
cup with a mélange roast but don't do it often because of the multiple
batches of same green needed. And since I always have multiple different
greens roasted and rested don't want too much of one green roasted at a
time. BUT, since I can easily compensate for a small starting batch by
dialing back fan and heater voltage (smallest Rosto batch I've tried was 1oz
just for fun), then add more greens... could even go three different drop in
times no problem....
Hmmm, yes, definitely worth trying IMO! It'd take some profile adjusting
tweaking, but what's new about that anyway?
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

5) From: Ryuji Suzuki
From: Ben Treichel 
Subject: +A differrnt malange?
Date: Wed, 02 Jun 2004 16:41:51 -0400
<Snip>
Many of my roasts are melange, so I've tried a lot of different
techniques.  Staging the addition of beans is much less satisfactory
than staging the removal of roasted beans from the roaster. I know the
former is much easier with most roasting setup. But I think the
difference is so big that I would not do it that way.
The reason is that, even if you add some portion of the bean 2 minutes
later, those beans reach the same temperature within a couple of
minutes, and follow pretty much the same temperature profile from then
and on. So melange with wide roast-distribution is difficult to get.
On the other hand, if you remove some portion at city, some more at
full city-, and get the rest at full city+ and mix them (just an
example), you'll get a very nice melange.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)

6) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Jun 2, 2004, at 10:49 PM, Ryuji Suzuki wrote:
<Snip>
One advantage of wok roasting is that it is easy to remove some of the 
beans at different stages.   Good for making a malange or just trying 
the same bean at different degrees of roast.
Jim Gundlach

7) From: Ryuji Suzuki
From: Pecan Jim Gundlach 
Subject: Re: +A differrnt malange?
Date: Wed, 02 Jun 2004 23:03:31 -0500
<Snip>
I agree. My setup is basically a wok plus Turbo Oven.
A lazy version of melange is to take some portion at city stage, and
then slack on agitation. By the time the average bean is full city,
there will be some FC- and FC+. Combine the city roast previously
removed and it's no longer an "uneven roast" but given a fancy name
(and cup quality).
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)

8) From: Allen Marsalis
At 11:03 PM 6/2/2004 -0500, Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
 >
 >One advantage of wok roasting is that it is easy to remove some of the
 >beans at different stages.   Good for making a malange or just trying
 >the same bean at different degrees of roast.
 >
I bought a wok the other day Jim.  I really would like to have
two of them, one for roasting, and the other for food.
The one I purchased is a fancy model with stainless steel on
the outside, aluminum in the core, and some sort of titanium
non-stick coating on the inside.
I tried it with food and really didn't like it because I
really couldn't generate enough heat.  My burners have
an outer ring of flames but no inside ring of flames and
the flames miss the wok bottom because of the curved surface.
Anyway, I'm half way there now.  :)  Just need a little
more time, a heat gun, and a small stack of wood.  Do you
think this wok might do?  Or should I just go get a real
steel version?
Allen
am


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