HomeRoast Digest


Topic: My first poppers... maker vs grinder (14 msgs / 261 lines)
1) From: Larry Dorman
jeff wrote:
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For your defense, that's what I 'heard' you say the first time. :)
Just to take the debate somewhere, let's assume that I have a $75 budget 
to get either a new coffee maker or a new coffee grinder.
For the coffee maker I want something easy (ie: start it and forget it) 
that makes at least 6 cups at one time.  I also don't want something 
that requires a lot of maintenance.  I want to be able to drop the 
pieces in the dishwasher for cleaning.
A grinder needs to be durable enough to last five years of once daily 
use.  I'm presuming it would be burr grinder.  I don't care if it's 
manual or electric, although manual has some appeal.
Which one should I get?  What make/model?  Why?
LarryD
$0 Bannerless Web Hosting, 10 POP and Web Email Accounts, & more
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2) From: Peter Barnes
I wrote up a post on this on my blog a while back...http://www.livejournal.com/users/periol/19188.htmlSeriously, for $75?  Buy a Zass and a French press.  You can start and 
forget the press for 3 minutes.  ;-)
You're going to get FAR superior coffee to the coffee you would get from 
any coffee maker for less than probably $150.  Some people on the list 
have some seriously tweaked Bunn makers that work for them, but for my 
money, this is it.  If the press coffee doesn't work for you, get a used 
chemex from ebay or something.  That's what I use every day for my 
coffee to go.  Five cups in the morning into the thermos, good all day.
At $75, you're going to regret wasting money on anything that runs on 
electricity.  :)
cheers
peter
Larry Dorman wrote:
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3) From: Ben Treichel
Peter Barnes wrote:
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Thats how I got started, and how I recommend people start.

4) From: Johnny Kent
At 08:37 PM 6/2/2004 -0400, Ben wrote:
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Ben>Thats how I got started, and how I recommend people start.
Me too. Buy a zass. Our zass is still going strong after 11+ years of more
than daily use.
A good grinder is _the_ place to start in spending money for coffee making.
What model? The best zassenhaus you can buy for your $75. http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.zas.shtmlExcept I'd pad the budget and get the 169 a little more expensive but it's
the most sturdy.
Cheers,
Johnny

5) From: R.N.Kyle
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$75  is a low budget for a coffee maker and a grinder.
Id opt for a Chem X  SM sells them under $36 for a 10 cup.http://sweetmarias.com/prod.zas.shtmlnow I know you will be over budget by $25 but you will have some quality">http://sweetmarias.com/prod.brewers.shtmland a 161 D Zass hand grind burr grinder $62http://sweetmarias.com/prod.zas.shtmlnow I know you will be over budget by $25 but you will have some quality
coffee equipment for $100 that should last a life time if properly cared
for.
Just a thought
Ron Kyle

6) From: jeff
i like the idea (already posted) of a Zass and a press. it is really 
tough to beat the press for brew quality and simplicity at a relatively 
low cost.
as for the zass i've not tried one but there does seem to be a lot of 
rabid-- i mean serious-- proponents. : )
-jeff r

7) From: Ben Treichel
jeff wrote:
<Snip>
Yep, And I own a Faema Compact and a Rocky. However, my Zass still get a 
place of honor, and goes on trips iwth me.

8) From: Jeff Wikstrom
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Can you believe that my wife actually asked me if I was bringing coffee with
me on our upcoming roadtrip?  Duh!  Back to that in-dash espresso unit...
Jeff Wikstrom

9) From: Lowe, David
I agree, I have a Zass 169 DG (a bit beyond the budget you mentioned) =
and love it. There are less expensive Zass grinders and I'm sure they =
are good as well. I don't think you can get a better grinder for several =
times the price. Some day I'll get a MM, but this will do for a long =
time. 
French press coffee is great, that's what I drink at work all the time. =
Some times you can find them cheap at garage sales or thrift stores.
Dave Lowe

10) From: Gene Smith
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with
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You know...I bet a turbocharger would make a perfect on-the-road roaster.
Instead of using the blower to supercharge the engine, you route it to roast
the beans.  Roasting chamber should be made of some really heavy pyrex, and
should stick right through the hood - with a nice, high-flow chrome air
cleaner for a chaff catcher...
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

11) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
with
<Snip>
You know...I bet a turbocharger would make a perfect on-the-road roaster.
Instead of using the blower to supercharge the engine, you route it to roast
the beans.  Roasting chamber should be made of some really heavy pyrex, and
should stick right through the hood - with a nice, high-flow chrome air
cleaner for a chaff catcher...
Fresh coffee on the road problem...Solved!
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

12) From: Jean
From: "Peter Barnes" 
 
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<Snip>
If you don't want a press, another choice is an electric kettle and a =
Melita pour-over.
Jean :~)

13) From: John Abbott
On Sun, 2004-06-06 at 15:54, Jean wrote:
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Or a Chemex - which Sweet Maria's sellshttp://sweetmarias.com/prod.brewers.shtml#chemexAnd it makes to kill for coffee

14) From: Jean
From: "John Abbott" 
<Snip>
a Melita pour-over.
<Snip>
True, but he said he didn't want to fuss.  With an electric kettle, a =
press and/or pour-over are close to fuss-free, especially compared to =
the quality (lack of) of an auto-drip.  Vac pots are awesome, but =
probably not the best choice for one who really would prefer an =
auto-drip.  I would have suggested the Krupps Moka Pot (best sub I've =
seen/tasted for auto-drip stand-in), but that wouldn't fit his budget.
Jean


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