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Topic: Chaff Question (4 msgs / 116 lines)
1) From: Matt Roth
Hey all,
    I'm new to roasting but I've done quite well for myself, I think.  I've
only turned one batch of greens to charcoal and have not been disappointed
with any of the other coffee that I've roasted.  With one small exception.
I upgraded from a FR+ to an I-Roast last week.  And I have noticed that the
chaff is heavier on the bean after roasting with the I-Roast.  This coffee
was a bit bitter but other than that good.  That's where my question comes
in.  How do you remove more of the chaff from the roasted beans?  The chaff
in the split of the bean is still quite heavy.  I have split the bean and
found quite a large piece of skin in there.  Is there a roasting method of
some type that will get the bean to release the chaff from inside it or do I
continue to look at the beans and work the bad ones by hand?  Thanks for any
and all info!!!
Matt

2) From: gman
Hi all,
I am a relative newbee to the home roasting world, and I have a few
questions about the chaff that is found in the center of the bean.
Since the process of roasting the bean causes it to expand, almost all
of the outer chaff falls off very quickly after beginning to roast.
However, the thin strip of chaff in the center of the fold (of each
bean) comes off while grinding and tends to make a mess of my Virtuoso
and the ground beans. Also, my wife claims that it makes the coffee
taste bitter.
Additional info: I roaster using a hot air popper and the beans are
various varieties from SMs.
Any suggestions on controlling this? What do most HR'ers do?
Ken

3) From: Ken Mary
If the chaff in the seam is a very light color, you may be underroasting. 
Extend the roast time or add a few degrees to the finish temperature and the
chaff will darken. In my experience, the chaff has no taste when present in
normal amounts in coffee.
You can make a chaff tea. Collect all the chaff from a popper roast and put
in a tea ball or french press in about 6 oz hot water. It tastes like a weak
grassy green tea.
I have not brewed a tea with the dark chaff I get from my drum roaster. This
oversight will get immediate attention today. Most of the chaff stays in the
drum and is roasted with the beans.
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4) From: raymanowen
"Any suggestions on controlling this [chatter]?"
Yes-
"Hush, my sweet..."
I get the chaff storm starting about 1/3rd of the way into the total roast
time, FWIW.
Also, I can honestly say that I definitely have never experienced bitter
coffee in this trailer. The chaff has practically No flavor, compared to th=
e
1000 X greater mass and volume of the bean itself.
How 'bout them Virtuoso burrs? It sounds like you have things right, but ma=
y
need to play around a little.
Try this:
When you're setting your grinder up for a new session after cleaning up the
previous residue with a brush and vacuum,
reinstall the upper burr,
reinstall the bean hopper with the white fuzzy ring in place.
Turn the bean hopper/ grind adjustment 5 clicks to the right, or clockwise.
Try that as the grind setting for a full pot of Fabulous Coffee.
Measure 1/2 cup of whole beans into the bean hopper.
Reinstall the coffee grounds basket or grind right into your coffee maker's
filter basket.
Grind it all into the grounds basket or your filter basket.
Your brew water should be around 200 F. (That's about boiling temperatur=
e
in the Denver area) Extend the immersion time of the grounds in the water t=
o
two minutes, if you can.
Brew man, brew! Try that Cuppa!
"Oh, this is too strong!" is easier to fix than "Oh, this is too weak!"
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
"The indisputable truth is that no coffee is fresh if it isn't fresh
roasted." - - Martin Diedrich


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