HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Alps - temp measurement (7 msgs / 403 lines)
1) From: Robert Cantor
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Measuring the temp has done me little good.  I 
bought an infra red thermometer of good quality and the temp of the beans varies 
widely at any given time.  I measure highs of 435 and av of 417 on charred 
beans.  I've gone back to color and cracks.  A thermometer in the 
middle (axially) measuring air temp may do you some good in comparing 
roasts and I'm hoping the others who have modified their alps for 
measurement will chime in with their experiences.
 
 
Bob C.
rcantor

2) From: Thom Underwood
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From my casual (but regular) temperature 
measurements using the HP I would say that temperatures well over 400 degrees 
would indeed char a coffee bean.  On the HP the beans would go into second 
crack from 340 to 350 degrees.  Albeit I was measuring air temp but the tip 
of the thermometer was just sticking into the flowing beans.
 
Remember... I am primarily interested in creating 
repeatable results.  If a thermometer placed axially gives me consistent 
readings providing worthwhile information I will be happy.
 
In fact I will probably try out my 5" Pelouz to 
start and then go to the 12 incher if needed.
 
Thanks to all for their feedback.
 
Regards - Thom
 
 

3) From: Michael Rochman
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I echo your results. However, I've gone a step further. 
Via notes and timing, I've been able to get certain beans (mainly some Kenya) 
timed to very close to the 9 setting on our Alp. Now, when roasting ~most~ 
Kenya, I set the timer to 9 and can not tell the difference between that and 
listening for cracks. 
 
We usually roast 6-7 batches in a day and our family 
drinks that with 8-10 days. No muss, no fuss, and it's done for us. 
 
Might be worth a try for some others. Note your time 
for particular bean. Refer to Alp time/number chart, and see if it will come 
close for you. If it comes close, try a blind sipping test and see if you can 
tell the difference between the two. If you can't tell a difference, you might 
save yourself a ton of bother. 
 
Mike
 
  
  Measuring the temp has done me little good.  
  I bought an infra red thermometer of good quality and the temp of the beans 
  varies widely at any given time.  I measure highs of 435 and av of 417 on 
  charred beans.  I've gone back to color and cracks.  A thermometer 
  in the middle (axially) measuring air temp may do you some good in 
  comparing roasts and I'm hoping the others who have modified their alps 
  for measurement will chime in with their experiences.
   

4) From: Thom Mackris
It would appear to me that getting to know your machine is the trick.  A
thermometer would be helpful if you noticed some changes in the
characteristics of your roast or if you started to play with a new machine
... IOW, for calibration purposes.
Comments?
Cheers,
Thom (getting closer to doing something about this instead of pontificating)

5) From: Don Staricka
Thom,
You mention the HWP hitting second crack around 340 to 350 degrees. This
must be a typo. According to the chart in "Home Coffee
Roasting" you won't even hit first crack until at least 380. In my
experience I generally hear first crack only above 410. Second crack
comes around 440. Some differences are attributable to thermometer
placement and thermometer accuracy but in general it sounds like you are
100 degrees too low. The tip the thermometer should be buried in the
beans but not touching the bottom of the roaster. If you are really
getting the temperatures you reported you ought to see how the
thermometer reads when immersed in boiling water.
Don
At 09:02 PM 3/21/01 -0800, you wrote:
From my
casual (but regular) temperature measurements using the HP I would say
that temperatures well over 400 degrees would indeed char a coffee
bean.  On the HP the beans would go into second crack from 340 to
350 degrees.  Albeit I was measuring air temp but the tip of the
thermometer was just sticking into the flowing beans.
 
Remember... I am primarily interested in
creating repeatable results.  If a thermometer placed axially gives
me consistent readings providing worthwhile information I will be
happy.
 
In fact I will probably try out my 5"
Pelouz to start and then go to the 12 incher if needed.
 
Thanks to all for their feedback.
 
Regards - Thom
 
 

6) From: Ken Parker
 
I've had my Alp for about one year. I have found that time of roast (start, 
1st crack, 2nd crack and stop), temperature and sound, taken together, 
provide me with the input necessary to produce consistent roasts . Of 
course, the bean is another variable. I also keep a record of each roast. I 
have never had good results using the automatic features of the Alp. I just 
crank mine up to 15 and keep track of the above variables.
On the other, experimenting is part of the fun.
Enjoy,
Ken Parker
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7) From: Thom Underwood
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You are right, of course, I was 100 degrees off 
with my statement.  Mea culpa.
 
Regards - Thom
 
 


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