HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Cuisinart Burr grinder (40 msgs / 1197 lines)
1) From: Scott Morrison

Does any one on the list have experience with the apparently new Cuisinart Burr grinder. I think the model number is DBM-8. I saw it as my wife and I were shopping last night. I looks like it has 18 stops on its adjustment ring. FYI, I do not yet have an espresso machine, I almost always do auto drip.

Thanks,

Scott Morrison


FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar get it now!

2) From: chris schepers
Scott Morrison wrote:
<Snip>
I saw one in Bed, Bath, & Beyond this past weekend... had the 
opportunity to take the bean hopper off and get a look at the burrs.  
They're the same knob-style burrs like in the B&D SmartGrind, & other 
Salton-style burr grinders (right?).  Looks pretty nice, though.  
Ironically, I bought a Braun KMM30, expecting it to have 'real' burrs, 
like they traditionally have had.. but, no luck.  I guess they've 
changed those to the same cheapo-style burrs also.  Too bad I lost the 
darn reciept already... thankfully it'll only be doing drip at work.
Chris Schepers

3) From: Matt Doughty
I found this cusinart eletric burr grinder (Cuisinart DBM-8 Supreme Grind 
Automatic Burr Mill). I was wondering if anyone knows if this is a passable 
cheap alternative to a Zass, or just a waste of money.
TIA
--Matt

4) From: R.N.Kyle
I have had several small inexpensive burr grinders and have found that they
are a waste of money. They produce some dust and ware out rather quickly.
The $100 and under category electric burr grinders are not worth buying. A
Zass is a quality grinder and produce quality grinding for years. The next
best electric grinder is IMO the Solis Maestro Plus. Then the Rocky, and
then the Masser Mini. I wasted allot of money trying to save money and it
was a waste of time and money. save and buy one that will last a life time.
RK

5) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Jul 25, 2004, at 7:37 AM, R.N.Kyle wrote:
<Snip>
I might add that I wasted more of the good taste in the coffee I 
roasted by trying to save money on grinders than anything else.  If you 
want good coffee, you have to get a good grinder.  I lucked out and got 
a Mazzer Major that only need a new power cord and hopper for less than 
$100 including the new cord and hopper.  I bought it as a restoration 
project but it did not need much restoration.  I disagree with Ron on 
the Solis.   Until Solis decides to spend $5.00 more to build a 
stronger burr support structure and makes both burrs replaceable, I 
believe the Solis is another short term mistake.
     Jim Gundlach

6) From: Lesley Albjerg
The latest article on the Coffee Geek makes some very interesting comments about grinders.  He in essence says we are willing to spent upwards of $1,000 on an espresso machine and little on a grinder that complements the machine.  He says the espresso machine in reality compliments the grinder!  You can have a Giotto and a whirly bird grinder and not make a good shot as compared to a Rocky Grinder and a Krups espresso machine.  I agree!   Ron your confessions should spur people on to buy a good grinder to start with it is a whole lot cheaper in the long run!
 
Les
"R.N.Kyle"  wrote:
I have had several small inexpensive burr grinders and have found that they
are a waste of money. They produce some dust and ware out rather quickly.
The $100 and under category electric burr grinders are not worth buying. A
Zass is a quality grinder and produce quality grinding for years. The next
best electric grinder is IMO the Solis Maestro Plus. Then the Rocky, and
then the Masser Mini. I wasted allot of money trying to save money and it
was a waste of time and money. save and buy one that will last a life time.
RK

7) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<Snip>
was a waste of time and money. save and buy one that will last a life =
time.
RK
The Maestro Plus is not the grinder to buy if your main drink is =
Espresso, it will hold up well for drip and press, but will not last a =
life time. Actually it is better to save your money and buy a Rocky or a =
Masser Mini. these girders will with reasonable care last a life time =
and the burr sets are replaceable. 
RK

8) From: alfred
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It is not so much that the less expensive grinders can't produce an =
acceptable cup, however in most cases, the less expensive ones don't =
have the infinitely adjustable and repeatable settings so necessary when =
you switch from one bean variety to another. If you are an espresso or =
cap drinker, and roast different beans it becomes important.Watch any =
good barista and note how often he or she adjusts the grind. On my =
Mazzer Mini, I am constantly tweaking the adjustment.

9) From: Edward Spiegel
<Snip>
With regards to the Maestro, I have read many reports that the burrs wear out after a while when set to grind fine enough for espresso because there is some give in the mechanism that results in the burrs occasionally touching (and hence wearing down).
While it is surely true that an even grind is important for quality coffee regardless of brew type, it also seems clear that espresso brewing is particularly sensitive to grind. So, I think that it is fair to say that grind unevenness has a proportionally larger impact on espresso than on other brewing methods.
That's my take anyway -- perhaps I'm wrong.
--E

10) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
I'm amazed how people come to a list where people share their 
experiences and when people tell them what they have learned,  they 
come back and say they don't like what they hear and they won't listen.
        Jim Gundlach
On Jul 25, 2004, at 2:28 PM, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
to 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
I'm amazed how people come to a list where people share their
experiences and when people tell them what they have learned,  they
come back and say they don't like what they hear and they won't listen.
       Jim Gundlach
On Jul 25, 2004, at 2:28 PM, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
9999,0000,0000 I am curious about the
thinking behind a statement like "
Arialis not the grinder to buy if
your main drink is Espresso, it will hold up well for drip and =
press".
=
Arial9999,0000,0000
I have heard of the importance of an even grind, regardless of brewing
type.
=
Arial9999,0000,0000
Who has the equipment to check evenness of grind? Is there a way to
detect this with a magnifying glass, or by =
feel?
=
Arial9999,0000,0000
I've been using a couple of under-$100 grinders for more than 10
years, with no detectable problems.
=
Arial9999,0000,0000
I'm not saying my coffee wouldn't be better with a more even grind,
but until I have a measurable basis for assessing evenness, I'm not
ready to pour money into it.
=
Arial9999,0000,0000
The one annoyance with both my grinders is static electricity, but I
believe that some expensive grinders have this complaint as =
well.
=
Arial9999,0000,0000
Dave S.
9999,0000,0000 R.N.Kyle wrote:
9999,0000,0000>. I wasted allot of money trying
to save money and it
9999,0000,0000 was a waste of time and money.
save and buy one that will last a life time.
9999,0000,0000 RK
9999,0000,0000
=
Arial9999,0000,0000The
Maestro Plus is not the grinder to buy if your main drink is Espresso,
it will hold up well for drip and press, but will not last a life
time. Actually it is better to save your money and buy a Rocky or a
Masser Mini. these girders will with reasonable care last a life time
and the burr sets are replaceable.
=
Arial9999,0000,0000
RK
9999,0000,0000

11) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<Snip>
<Snip>
Then if experience is not enough, then I suggest that go out and spend =
the money I have already spent and do the testing yourself. I was merely =
trying to save someone the money  and the constant upgrading that I and =
many others have already been thru to end up with a Rocky or Mini, or =
higher end grinder
Some of us are more particular with our equipment then others, and maybe =
a low level burr grinder will do just fine for some people. After all =
the final judgment is in the cup, and not everyone's needs, or tastes =
are the same. 
RK

12) From: Jeffrey A. Bertoia
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
<Snip>
That was kind...  Many of us feel that the Solis 166, 177, Maestro, 
Maestro+ are not very good
at all let alone for espresso.  This also extends to most of the other 
plastic housed grinders.
<Snip>
The problem is not necessarily one of even grind in the beginning but 
the fact that since
the burrs are not rigidly mounted in metal they wobble and can touch 
when grinding for
espresso and turkish.  This immediately dulls them and in the solis one 
side of the burr
is not replaceable.
<Snip>
Screens are used to determine grind eveness and iirc Jim Gundlach at 
least has a set.
<Snip>
Good for you.  I went through 2 in less than 3 years.
<Snip>
Then don't but the recommendations from Ron, Jim, Les, MM, myself and 
others are based
on experience.
<Snip>
To the best of my knowledge _none_ of the metal housed grinders exhibit 
any static problems.
Certainly neither my Rocky or my La Pavoni Zip exhibits any static 
issues at all.  The static
in my Solis was so bad the drop chute used to jam regularly.  I did 
manage to use the static in
my Braun to my advantage though.  It was strong enough that the fines 
got stuck on the side
of the canister so that they did not get mixed into the grounds :)
jeff
<Snip>

13) From: Ben Treichel
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
<Snip>
Most people know for a fact that an uneven grind affects the quality, 
however I suggest that you prove it to yourself and then bring us the facts.
(Gin feel free to express some thought to this troll)
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

14) From: John Blumel
<Snip>
Why is it that whenever a new person questions the established opinions 
of the list, on virtually any topic, that they get labeled a troll? Are 
we so insecure in our opinions and 'facts' that anyone who doesn't just 
take our word for it is perceived as a threat? How can a person new to 
the list possibly know what has been discussed in the past and what has 
been said about it?
John Blumel

15) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Perhaps I can help from personal experience, Although, I have never =
measure fineness of ground etc. My personal empirical results have shown =
a burr grinder to be the best. I too am a brewed coffee drinker. When I =
started in my quest for the perfect cup of coffee I used a blade =
grinder. I finally became convinced that the grinder was one of the most =
important variables in achieving my goal. However, I was not ready to =
spend $300 or so at that point to achieve my goal. I bought the =
Zassenhaus 169 DG.http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.zas.shtmlfor under =
$100. My coffee improved (in my estimation) at least 25%. In addition, I =
am able to repeat my results over and over again. The reliability =
(repeatability) is absent with a blade grinder. If I ever decide to =
upgrade to an electric grinder. My Zass is nice enough to be displayed =
in my home. I hope this helps

16) From: Lesley Albjerg
Dave,
If you look through the archives you will see that Pecan Jim did some objective testing with a multitude of screens to check evenness of grind in various grinders.  Believe me, if you came to my house and brought your grinder (I don't care what brew method you use) and your homeroasted beans, and we did a head on test with my Mazzer Super Jolly (you pick the brew method) adjusted to the proper grind for the brew method vs. your cheap grinder, after one cup you would have a BIG problem with your cheap grinder!  My vac pot brewed Tegu this morning was so smooth.  One of the big reasons was nice even extraction because my grind is very consistant.  Poor Pecan Jim, always the teacher!
 
Les
Pecan Jim Gundlach  wrote:
I'm amazed how people come to a list where people share their 
experiences and when people tell them what they have learned, they 
come back and say they don't like what they hear and they won't listen.
Jim Gundlach
On Jul 25, 2004, at 2:28 PM, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: R.N.Kyle
<Snip>
Here are some hard facts on a few grinders that Jim Gunlach tested a year or
2 ago. There is not much that has not been discussed in length on this list
and it is kept in the archives for all to search and read. Click on the link
below and read about Jims testing with screens.http://themeyers.org/cgi-bin/nopre.cgi/HomeRoast/Topic5672.htmRon

18) From: R.N.Kyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
You are welcome . there are a bunch of thread on this and related =
subjects. its hard to find the exact thread but Jim did several other =
test from samples sent to him by list members. do some searching to see =
if you can find them
RK

19) From: Ben Treichel
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
<Snip>
I sent the zass sample in; I think it was only subjectivley evaluated 
since Jim was running out of time and spousal patience at the same time. 
FYI, not as good as a Rockey, et.al. better than small plastic grinders.
<Snip>
-- 
Ben Treichel
Program Manager
S.E Michigan
SwRI
248-232-7365 (o)
248-935-6845 (m)

20) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I also use a vac pot Bodin Solaris.Stalling has not been a problem with =
the Zass. I find if I leave the pot on a high flame until I get a strong =
"blurp" in to the top section then immediately cut my flame down low. =
Let the pot sit on the low flame for one minute to strengthen the brew, =
then remove the pot stalling is avoided. Set the Zass one turn clockwise =
from the tightest position and enjoy

21) From: Allen Marsalis
At 06:32 PM 7/25/2004 -0500, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
<Snip>
Dave, I cannot quantify my opinion scientifically.  But I used
a Solis Maestro for a year then upgraded to a Mazzer Mini, and
I can say that I notice the difference in my cup, and it is not
just my imagination or wanting to agree politically.  The grind
is very consistent and the finer the grind is, the less margin
for error we have to work with.
Tools are funny things.  Take drills for example.  Most folks think
of Makita or DeWalt. But higher up, there is Hilti or maybe Milwaukee
and cheaper there is Ryobi or B&D.  But they all drill holes.  It is
not that one drills holes a whole lot better than the others. It
might be hard to look at a hole and say, "brand X" drilled that hole!
Rather the factors are many:
Longevity
Look and feel
Reliability
Price
Maintenance
Consistency
Power
Availability
Brand Loyalty
Accessories
Advertising/Promotion
and yes, even a little Prestige.  :)
Best of luck making a wise choice, not only on what
grinder to buy, but what things are most important to you.
Allen
am

22) From: Lesley Albjerg
Allen,
I really like your analogy!  However, I think you have it a little wrong.  The grinder is not the drill, but the drill bit!  The drill is the machine you use to make the whole.  Whereas the extraction machine (espresso, drip, french press etc) is what is used to make the coffee.  The problem with a cheap grinder is that it is like a cheap drill bit, it doesn't last and it starts making odd sized holes!
 
Les
Allen Marsalis  wrote:
At 06:32 PM 7/25/2004 -0500, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
<Snip>
Dave, I cannot quantify my opinion scientifically. But I used
a Solis Maestro for a year then upgraded to a Mazzer Mini, and
I can say that I notice the difference in my cup, and it is not
just my imagination or wanting to agree politically. The grind
is very consistent and the finer the grind is, the less margin
for error we have to work with.
Tools are funny things. Take drills for example. Most folks think
of Makita or DeWalt. But higher up, there is Hilti or maybe Milwaukee
and cheaper there is Ryobi or B&D. But they all drill holes. It is
not that one drills holes a whole lot better than the others. It
might be hard to look at a hole and say, "brand X" drilled that hole!
Rather the factors are many:
Longevity
Look and feel
Reliability
Price
Maintenance
Consistency
Power
Availability
Brand Loyalty
Accessories
Advertising/Promotion
and yes, even a little Prestige. :)
Best of luck making a wise choice, not only on what
grinder to buy, but what things are most important to you.
Allen
am

23) From: Allen Marsalis
Thanks for perfecting that analogy Les!  It is interesting to note
that it takes both a quality bit (grinder) and properly sized drill
(extraction machine) to drill a consistent hole repeatedly (pull a shot
repeatedly, that is) One or the other just doesn't quite cut it!
The main reason for a really good grinder that I haven't heard mention
yet is what Chris pointed out the other day - That a skilled professional
barista will adjust the grind often while trying to nail down everything
else as a constant.  The grind is never constant, so it is very important
to have good control over it.  That is, the perfect grind is never perfect
for long.  So the best grinder is not one that produces a perfect grind,
but rather one that produces unyielding control over the grind by its
operator.  Right?  :)
Allen
am
At 08:23 PM 7/25/2004 -0700, Lesley Albjerg wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Lesley Albjerg
Well said Allen!  And that is why I prefer the Mazzer over the Rocky.  That said, the Rocky does a very uniform grind and the burrs can be replaced.
 
Les
Allen Marsalis  wrote:
Thanks for perfecting that analogy Les! It is interesting to note
that it takes both a quality bit (grinder) and properly sized drill
(extraction machine) to drill a consistent hole repeatedly (pull a shot
repeatedly, that is) One or the other just doesn't quite cut it!
The main reason for a really good grinder that I haven't heard mention
yet is what Chris pointed out the other day - That a skilled professional
barista will adjust the grind often while trying to nail down everything
else as a constant. The grind is never constant, so it is very important
to have good control over it. That is, the perfect grind is never perfect
for long. So the best grinder is not one that produces a perfect grind,
but rather one that produces unyielding control over the grind by its
operator. Right? :)
Allen
am
At 08:23 PM 7/25/2004 -0700, Lesley Albjerg wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Matt Doughty
On Sun, Jul 25, 2004 at 07:03:37AM -0400, Matt Doughty wrote:
<Snip>
Ok, I decided on a Zass. Thanks for all the info.
--Matt

26) From: Lesley Albjerg
Dave,
The grind stays the same.  You vary the grind to compensate for other environmental differences such as humidity, bean density, age of the bean, etc.  If you are interested in flavor, eventually you will be interested in espresso!  I bought an espresso machine to prove that I didn't like it!  The best flavor is extracted with pressure!
 
Les
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote:
Do I understand you correctly, that the grinder, be it Rocky or Mazzer, doesn't produce the same fineness of grind each time (with the same beans)?
I thought the issue of needing to frequently adjust the grinder for espresso, was that the espresso machine required a different grind depending on environmental conditions.
Is there general agreement on this?
Dave S.
p.s. Not that I have a particular interest in espresso, but I am interested in variations in grind, as it affects the extraction flavour of the brew.
Allen Marsalis wrote:
The main reason for a really good grinder that I haven't heard mention 
yet is what Chris pointed out the other day - That a skilled professional 
barista will adjust the grind often while trying to nail down everything 
else as a constant.  The grind is never constant, so it is very important 
to have good control over it.  That is, the perfect grind is never perfect 
for long.  So the best grinder is not one that produces a perfect grind, 
but rather one that produces unyielding control over the grind by its 
operator.  Right?  :) 
Allen 
am

27) From: Angelo
Jim,
I've learned early on in life that you can, "give a horse a drink, but you 
can't make it water".
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

28) From: Lesley Albjerg
Dave,
What addicted me was being introduced by Mike McKoffee to 5 x 5 Americanos.(Thanks Mike!)  I always thought it was heresy to put water in your coffee!    A 5 oz double pull mixed with 5 oz of hot water.  It will simply blow the socks off of any brewed cup of coffee when it comes to complexity and flavor.  I drink about 20% espresso shots and about 80% Americanos.
 
Les
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote:
Thanks for the clarification.
I might learn to love espresso - I occasionally order a capuccino or latte at a coffee house.
The upside would be that I've found another drink I like.
The downside would be that I'd have to spend CDN$1500 to get the equipment to produce it at home.
Not to mention a bigger kitchen to include coffee bar space.
Someone neglected to budget for that in my pension plan.
I'm content to work on making the best brewed coffee I can.
I have now tried the "new technique" of soaking the beans before roasting, as an introduction to the Austrailian Mountain Top experience.
I did not taste a significant difference, but I did enjoy the flavour both ways.
My next experiment will be to try removing the dust from my grind by using a flour sifter, to see if I benefit significantly.
If that works, then I can avoid paying a high price for a new grinder by paying for and throwing away the dust, which reputedly makes up 10% - 20% of the grounds from any home grinder.
Dave S.
Lesley Albjerg wrote:
 
Dave,
The grind stays the same.  You vary the grind to compensate for other environmental differences such as humidity, bean density, age of the bean, etc.  If you are interested in flavor, eventually you will be interested in espresso!  I bought an espresso machine to prove that I didn't like it!  The best flavor is extracted with pressure!
 
Les

29) From: Lesley Albjerg
Angelo  wrote:Jim,
I've learned early on in life that you can, "give a horse a drink, but you 
can't make it water".
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

30) From: Jean
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Have you ever watched a television that used 'rabbit ears' instead of =
cable or dish?  You learn that, usually, certain ear positions are best =
for certain stations.  However, even if you always only watch the same =
channel, there are times you need to adjust or 'fine tune' because, in =
time, the signal drifts.  
You could be grinding the same beans from the same roasting and, because =
the beans change as they age AND because grinders 'drift', too, you =
would find yourself making adjustments, even with a good grinder.
I can't believe I used a tv analogy!
Jean  =~o

31) From: mv07921
Hello All,
Noob alert...
Has anyone tried the new Cuisinart burr grinder?  They are selling  
them at Costco for $30.  Mostly plastic outside, w/ faux stainless  
steel.  Couldn't check out the inside. Obviously I'm not expecting an  
german-engineered italian-made french-chef approved columbian-picked  
eskimo-refrigerated $150 grinder quality, but for $30 is it better  
than a whirly-blade grinder?
Also, is there something (far) cheaper than a Variac to downregulate  
voltage?  My toastmaster "hood" started bubbling and melting after  
only a few uses.  3-4 oz roast sizes, nothing crazy.  Tried an  
extension cord, not enough.  Plug is a 20 amp GFI plug.
It also melted a 550 candy thermometer.  And I  do mean melted.  The  
plastic bubbled right out.  On the first use.  I now roast with the  
top off and have no problem reaching 1st and 2nd crack if I so  
choose, total roast time about 5 1/2 - 6 min "topless" to start of  
2nd crack even in the garage with ambient temps in the 40-50s.  No  
chaff filter without the hood... gets messy.
My roasts are yummy though... now that they are not plasticky...
(another) mike

32) From: Michael Wascher
Would adjusting the thermostat a bit cooler help?
On 1/19/06, mv07921  wrote:
<Snip>
--
"Life is just one damned thing after another."
  - Elbert Hubbard

33) From: Woody DeCasere
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Where do you roast, I  use a standard setup with a cheapo popper and yes
it does warp after a while but nothing that dramatic.
 
Woody

34) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Mike,
I can offer some info on the grinder, if it's the one with the kind of
conical shaped bean hopper and the boxy grounds holder.  Model DBM
something, I think.
Used that one for a couple of years to grind for drip, moka pot, and
presspot.  It worked well for that.  It will not grind for espresso. 
The burrs are plate burrs, but not steel milled and sharpened.  This
grinder really grinds the beans.  A grinder with sharpened steel
grinders has more the effect of ripping the beans apart and exposing
more surface area for better results.
A more expensive grinder does a better job, too, for
drip/moka/presspot.  But it is a step up from a whirlyblade and for
$30, it's a considerable savings on the $80 they usually charge.
Other Cuisinart grinders (like the small mostly-metal boxy ones) may
give different results.
Hope this is helpful.
Brent
On 1/19/06, mv07921  wrote:
<Snip>

35) From: Jeffrey Bair
I have a Cuisinart burr grinder now and it's done a horrible job from day
one out of the box. Very little grind consistency, TONS of fines, major
static issues, etc. I think I paid $50 at bed bath and beyond. We just got
the Kitchen Aid Pro Line and it's made night and day difference in taste
with all brewing methods.
It was a very small improvement from whirly blade, but not $50 worth of
improvement. Probably not a $30 improvement either. If you decide to give i=
t
a try I wouldn't expect all too much from it, certainly not the improvement
that people talk about with the higher end burr grinders discussed here.
Jeff
On 1/19/06, Brent - SC/TO Roasting  wrote:
<Snip>

36) From: Gary Townsend
mv07921 wrote:Noob alert...
<Snip>
Mike,
That grinder probably won't last 6 months, by then, you will be fed up with
all of it's faults!
Buy a good, high quality grinder. Have you seen the NY Times article about
grinders? Good article, also, check out the grinders that Sweet Maria's
carries, very informative!
<Snip>
uses.  3-4 oz roast sizes, nothing crazy.  Tried an extension cord, not
enough.  Plug is a 20 amp GFI plug.
I now roast with the top off and have no problem reaching 1st and 2nd crack
if I so choose, total roast time about 5 1/2 - 6 min "topless" to start of
2nd crack even in the garage with ambient temps in the 40-50s.  No chaff
filter without the hood... gets messy.
I still roast 75% of the time, with air poppers! I tweak them to make them
better coffee roaster, and less like popcorn poppers!
I throw the plastic hoods in the trash can. No regrets, there! Next is to
find a soup can that will fit tightly into the roasting chamber, just cut
out both ends, and wash it out really good with hot soapy water. Otherwise,
you might get a new smell in your batch of coffee!
The next thing  that I will do is open it up and take a peek inside, and
bypass the bi-metalic switch ;-)  I carefully remove *just* the bimetal
part, and ensure that the electrical contacts are tight, and perfectly
matched up.
I do not advise removing the thermal fuse, if your popper gets too hot, it
will blow, and protect the popper, and you, and your home...
The latest trick that I have been doing to *all* of my poppery 2 type
poppers, is to widen up the roasting chamber slots. Very easy to do with a
1/8" flat tip screwdriver, while the popper is apart. I just insert the
blade along the slot, and give it a little twist, towards the outside of th=
e
roasting chamber, on all the slots. I have never had a stuck bean. You migh=
t
have problems if you widen them up from the inside of the chamber, because
you didn't want to take the popper apart. It just made more sense to me to
widen up the slot to catch more air, like a hood scoop on a race car, befor=
e
it goes into the roasting chamber.
The extra air allows me to increase the load of beans to 5 oz, and still
stretch out the roasting time to 2nd Crack to 10 minutes. The way to check
out how much your roaster will roast is to start with 3 oz of beans, and
turn on your popper, adding beans until it just barely begins to stop
moving. You need to do this in under a minute. Then unplug your roaster, an=
d
dump out and weigh the beans. Consider this amount your 'upper limit'. I
have some Popcorn pumpers that will roast 6 & 5/8 oz of beans, with some
help from a wooden spoon handle. I find that 5 oz is easier to control, and
I don't have to stir it at all.
Remember the bigger the mass of beans, the more heat is trapped in the mass=
,
and it can get hot in under 5 minutes ( rolling 2nd crack ). If you don't
want to open up your popper, that's fine, just try using less beans. A few
snaps into 2nd @ 8 to 10 minutes will usually produce a good cuppa joe. As
you gain experience with all the variables with each roast, you will be
roasting each batch of beans to your roast preference level, and that is wh=
y
we do it!
As far as the chaff goes is fine by me! I don't bother catching it during
the roast, afterwards, I sweep it up and that works for me. I've seen some
good examples that people make to capture the chaff, but I like watching it
fly!
Good luck,
Gary

37) From: tom ulmer
Hello noob...
I have a Cuisinart that I keep in an apartment where I stay in occasionally.
It is quite noisy and creates a fair amount of static but it will create a
grind that generally works in a press.

38) From: Bill Morgan
Hey mike,
I've been using the Cuisinart grinder you descibe for over a year now.
 Yep, it's noisy, creates too much dust in the grind, and the static
makes all that dust build up in one of the upper corners of the output
bin.  All that said, I _do_ find it to be much, much better than a
whirly blade and well worth the $40 I paid.  I expect it would be
useless for real expresso, but I'm not playing in that league yet. 
(Time will come...)
There's a lot of info on taming the Poppery II athttp://www.edwardspiegel.org/coffee. I run mine plugged into a 100'
16 gauge extension cord, which drops the voltage by about 5V and
allows me to stretch the roast times from 5-6 min to 10 min or so.
HTH,
Bill

39) From: Steve Hay
On 1/19/06, mv07921  wrote:
<Snip>
I am also relatively new to coffee roasting and the like, and have not
gotten into espresso much at all.  I have this grinder and I am satisfied
with it for general use.  Compared to the blade grinder I was using, I get
more aromatics from the coffee (pre-brew).  The grinds appear to be more
"smashed" than "chopped" in appearance and have a spongier unpacked
consistency.  This might be better than blade for espresso.  I also get
powder collecting across from the exit chute, which the other posts seem to
indicate is due to static electricity.  I've used it to make espresso and i=
t
wasn't anything to write home about.  I was using a cheap machine also.  On
the finest setting, I used it to make turkish coffee and I don't think it
was ground finely enough, though the end result was drinkable.
--
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com

40) From: raymanowen
"...espresso_ not yet."
A drink of espresso brewed coffee, done properly, will change all that.
Grinder first. When you acquire a grinder that allows you to set to ten
different settings for espresso brewing, and it makes a very noticeable
difference in the shot if you move as much as three steps away from the
optimum.
Clue a.):
You won't be able to hold the grinder at arm's length, using both hands-
Clue b.):
Cuisinart- Not It!
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 7/26/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


HomeRoast Digest