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Topic: 'nother newby (12 msgs / 315 lines)
1) From: briankk
Hello, Brian Knowles here.
I'm just getting started at home roasting, so far am adept a turning green beans into smoke and charcoal.   There seem to be some finer points to the use of the Alpinrost drum than are immediatly apparent..
I'm trying to roast  Yergechev (sp?), and pretty much no matter how I time it or listen, I'm not making good coffee.  Help!
bk

2) From: gin
Welcome Brian:
I still burn a batch or two now and again...
We have many Alp folks who will jump in and help you out.
ginny
At 06:52 AM 7/16/2004, you wrote:
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3) From: leslee berringer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Brian and welcome!  My advice would be to get an inexpensive digital =
thermometer from SM and dangle in the K-probe it comes with into the =
Alpen to get a temperature read.  If you don't go above 444 degrees on =
the K, then you should be fine with so many beans, including the Yirg.  =
This presumes that you can cool your beans when it hits 444 easily and =
quickly.  If not, and the beans keep roasting, a fact I am not at all =
sure of since I don't own an Alpenroast, the group can help you out =
here.  In other words tell you how to modify the end temp of your roast =
to compensate for extra roast time when you attempt to end your roast.   =
Also with this little device, it will be hard to burn roasts.  Call it =
cheating, but for a newbie it helps quite a bit.  After a while, you =
won't need it that much, but it gives you security.  Another cautionary =
note is that the placement of the K-probe is important.  Place it in the =
beans but not too low and not too high in the bean mass/emersion, and =
not near anything metal.  I just did a roast on my I-roast and somehow =
my K-probe got pushed next to the inner metal piece on this roaster.  =
Well it was very obvious that the temp was awry soon into the roast.  I =
knew this because I know the relative amount of time it takes to =
generate a certain amount of heat, based on previous roasts and my note =
taking on these roasts, and also based on sight.  So as a newbie, since =
this probe will be of value to avoid burning of beans, take care in the =
placement of the very end of the probe.
Good luck to you and may you find roasting as much fun as I do!
Leslee Berringer
-
---- Original Message ----- 
  From: gin 
  Sent: Friday, July 16, 2004 10:48 AM
  Welcome Brian:
  I still burn a batch or two now and again...
  We have many Alp folks who will jump in and help you out.
  ginny
  At 06:52 AM 7/16/2004, you wrote:
  >Hello, Brian Knowles here.
  >
  >I'm just getting started at home..

4) From: leslee berringer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Brain, glad to read you had a successful roast.  Exciting isn't it!  =
Someone here will know how to get a K-probe into an Alpen.  This is =
certain.  Perhaps you will get a post on this soon.
Leslee

5) From: Dave Huddle
<Snip>
My most used roaster is an Alpenrost.  I'm lazy, so I've never used a
probe or thermometer, _BUT_ I remeber that someone on the list has
notched the top lip of the bean cup, and inserted a thermometer through
the notch into the center of the rotating drum.
Maybe that will work for you.
Dave	Westerville, OH 
<Snip>
here will know how to get a K-probe into an Alpen.  This is certain.  Perhaps 
you will get a post on this soon.
<Snip>
<Snip>

6) From: briankk
Dave:
I think you have the idea, that's the only way I can see to get a probe in there.
How do you know when your roast is done with your drum roaster?
bk
<Snip>

7) From: Dave Huddle
Mostly I go by sound, smell & time.  I NEVER use the preset times built
into the Alp.
I start a timer when I start the roast, then sit back & listen for
steady 1st crack.  Around 2.5 minutes later I usually hear faint
beginnings of 2nd crack and hit the stop button.  In my crude roasting
log, I keep a record of bean, time of roast, temperature of the garage
where I roast, and the final result - 'looks good', 'too dark', 'too
light'.
For some beans, I go a little longer into 2nd crack.
I've roasted abour 120 pounds in the Alp so far.
Dave
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there.
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8) From: briankk
I'm working my way into that, I think I just need more time with the machine.  
bk
<Snip>

9) From: R.N.Kyle
welcome Brian.
When I had my alps  I would set the machine on 15 and watch for smoke and
listen for 1st crack when it finished 1st the smoke would slow down and when
it approached 2nd it would start up again then I could hear the 2nd crack I
would go 1 to 2 min. and eject.
I also inserted a Turkey Thermometer 13" long probe. I drill a hole just
large enough for the probe to slide thru but remain snug in the hole I drill
it dead center for the drums opening through the lid just above the cooling
bin. It worked great and did let you know a little of what was going inside
the drum.
RK

10) From: Brian Knowles
Thanks for the tip, I'll try the thermometer thing this weekend.  I've 
given some of these beans to a friend with a more conventional roaster, 
who reports that there is very little time or sound between just right 
and "gone"...
bk
On Friday, July 16, 2004, at 06:38 PM, R.N.Kyle wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Elliott H. O'Reilly
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have been using the Alp for about a year and a half now.  I do it much
like Dave Huddle, going by sight, sound & smell.  I also do not use the
presets as I have burned out 2 Alps by trusting them.  I roast Sumatra
Iskandar most often and I know that on my machine it will hit 2nd crack at
about 17 min.  When it was new it ran slightly hot and 2nd crack came closer
to 15 min.  I use a kitchen timer to time the roast and make sure that if I
wander away from the roaster that I come back by the 13 min mark to monitor
the rest of the roast.  If you are attentive with your early roasts you will
be able pick up your roast points pretty quickly thru trial and error.  If
you start out using good fresh single variety beans like Tom's at
SweetMaria's you will find it easy to hear the first and second cracks.
Blends and some lesser quality beans have cracks that can run into each
other because of variances in the roasting times of the beans.  Try to avoid
those until you are comfortable with your Alp.  If you burn a batch of beans
just remember that it happens to almost everyone.  A local roaster friend of
mine burned a 40lb batch in his Probat roaster and had the local fire
department about ready to drown him.  Right now I use the Alp to roast
Sumatra and other large beans, and a Hearthware Precision to roast Tanzania
and other peaberries, Yemens, etc.
Elliott

12) From: Brian Knowles
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Funny, most of what I'm doling comes in 17-18 min, by stop watch, and I =
tend to wonder off for the first ten minutes..  So far, I've avoided 
setting it on fire..
bk
On Friday, July 16, 2004, at 07:40 PM, Elliott H. O'Reilly wrote:
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beans 
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Funny, most of what I'm doling comes in 17-18 min, by stop watch, and
I tend to wonder off for the first ten minutes..  So far, I've avoided
setting it on fire..
bk
On Friday, July 16, 2004, at 07:40 PM, Elliott H. O'Reilly wrote:
ArialI have been using
the Alp for about a year and a half now.  I do it much like Dave
Huddle, going by sight, sound & smell.  I also do not use the presets
as I have burned out 2 Alps by trusting them.  I roast Sumatra
Iskandar most often and I know that on my machine it will hit 2nd
crack at about 17 min.  When it was new it ran slightly hot and 2nd
crack came closer to 15 min.  I use a kitchen timer to time the roast
and make sure that if I wander away from the roaster that I come back
by the 13 min mark to monitor the rest of the roast.  If you are
attentive with your early roasts you will be able pick up your roast
points pretty quickly thru trial and error.  If you start out using
good fresh single variety beans like Tom's at SweetMaria's you will
find it easy to hear the first and second cracks.  Blends and some
lesser quality beans have cracks that can run into each other because
of variances in the roasting times of the beans.  Try to avoid those
until you are comfortable with your Alp.  If you burn a batch of beans
just remember that it happens to almost everyone.  A local roaster
friend of mine burned a 40lb batch in his Probat roaster and had the
local fire department about ready to drown him.  Right now I use the
Alp to roast Sumatra and other large beans, and a Hearthware Precision
to roast Tanzania and other peaberries, Yemens, =
etc. 
 
ArialElliott
=
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