HomeRoast Digest


Topic: More pictures (18 msgs / 517 lines)
1) From: Allen Marsalis
I'm having a lot of fun drum roasting!  My first attempt wasn't
really intended for consumption and it ended up as a perfect
Vienna with a moderate amount of oil.  I was shooting for full
city and didn't end up burning the house down so I was rather
pleased with myself.  I actually heard a strong second crack
which I don't hear from an air roaster.  Lots of smoke too!
I counted a few beans with divots so I'm glad I went with Ron's
faster motor.  Overall, the roast looked wonderful (if you like
Vienna)  I don't, but my intention was to toss this very first
batch anyway to break in the drum.
Problems started when I let my eyes off the gauge for a moment
to setup the fan and temps crept up past 500* and I then tried
to compensate too much with adjustments. Also about 15 seconds
into second crack,  I started to panic. Where were my pliers?
hehe. At least I didn't burn myself or anything like that.  But
I knew the trip from the hot drum to the colander would be faster
next time around.
I used a box fan resting horizontally on two 2x4's and set the
colander on top for cooling like in Ed's pictures. This works
really well.
This rig packs a lot of heat so I will learn to respect the new
horsepower. The controls are very sensitive.  Tonight (my second
attempt) I fell a bit short of the mark - A nice city roast.
Here is a picture: (first drum roast actually meant for consumption
that is)http://www.shreve.net/~am/first_drum_roast.jpgIt's HP, so yes, I'm building up my confidence fast. (I knew
I wasn't going to take it as far as the night before)  I want
to be patient and give this 24 hours of rest, but it will be
a long 24 hours.  While I was at it, I took a picture of my
fast improving coffee bar.http://www.shreve.net/~am/the_bar.jpgI really like how my SM cups and Thor tamper match exactly!  :)
(I call that color "mousetail")
Thank you all for helping in its evolution!
Allen
am

2) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Yo, Allen!  Why don't you just offer your first roast to those of us who
*like* Vienna roasts instead of tossing it?  Was it Robusta or shot from
weasels or something?
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

3) From: Lesley Albjerg
A nice even roast!  Looks great!  I always enjoy seeing a Thor in it's new home!  It looks like you are on your way to some great roasts!
 
Les
Allen Marsalis  wrote:
I'm having a lot of fun drum roasting! My first attempt wasn't
really intended for consumption and it ended up as a perfect
Vienna with a moderate amount of oil. I was shooting for full
city and didn't end up burning the house down so I was rather
pleased with myself. I actually heard a strong second crack
which I don't hear from an air roaster. Lots of smoke too!
I counted a few beans with divots so I'm glad I went with Ron's
faster motor. Overall, the roast looked wonderful (if you like
Vienna) I don't, but my intention was to toss this very first
batch anyway to break in the drum.
Problems started when I let my eyes off the gauge for a moment
to setup the fan and temps crept up past 500* and I then tried
to compensate too much with adjustments. Also about 15 seconds
into second crack, I started to panic. Where were my pliers?
hehe. At least I didn't burn myself or anything like that. But
I knew the trip from the hot drum to the colander would be faster
next time around.
I used a box fan resting horizontally on two 2x4's and set the
colander on top for cooling like in Ed's pictures. This works
really well.
This rig packs a lot of heat so I will learn to respect the new
horsepower. The controls are very sensitive. Tonight (my second
attempt) I fell a bit short of the mark - A nice city roast.
Here is a picture: (first drum roast actually meant for consumption
that is)http://www.shreve.net/~am/first_drum_roast.jpgIt's HP, so yes, I'm building up my confidence fast. (I knew
I wasn't going to take it as far as the night before) I want
to be patient and give this 24 hours of rest, but it will be
a long 24 hours. While I was at it, I took a picture of my
fast improving coffee bar.http://www.shreve.net/~am/the_bar.jpgI really like how my SM cups and Thor tamper match exactly! :)
(I call that color "mousetail")
Thank you all for helping in its evolution!
Allen
am

4) From: Allen Marsalis
At 11:40 PM 7/20/2004 -0500, Gene Smith wrote:
 >
 >Yo, Allen!  Why don't you just offer your first roast to those of us who
 >*like* Vienna roasts instead of tossing it?  Was it Robusta or shot from
 >weasels or something?
 >
I thought about using Robusta.  I have 1/4 lb about 1.5 years
old that came in the sampler pack with my Rosto.  Then I thought,
no, that's too good.  I might want to make my own pseudo-Kopi
roast someday.  (I hear Tom's quality Robusta tastes similar)
Then I remembered some beans I bought from an un-named source.
I'll just say it has lots of monsooned beans in it.  One of
those "malabar gold" blends if you know what I mean.  I never
really liked it and I have quite a bit of it.  So that is how
I decided on what to roast in my quirky little mind..
Now, as to why I tossed it...  I can't remember if Ron suggests
tossing the very first batch or not.  (I recall reading something
to that effect somewhere).  Now this is in no way knocking Ron
or his product mind you.  It's great, just not ready to use out
of the box.
The drum is "industrial" and has some machine oil on it.  That
is, it is rather dirty and Ron suggests a cleaning method
followed by an initial burn-in period.  Also my grill is new
and the stainless steel burner plate had some thick oily residue
on it as well from the factory.
I followed Ron's cleaning method and also scrubbed it pretty
good on the outside with a brillo pad.  But the inside of the
drum is difficult to clean.  Thus the need for a "burn in"
period.
During the burn-in, the whole rig smoked for about 15-20 min.
I mean a lot of smoke as the oil and surface residues burn
off - more smoke than when roasting beans!  Stinky smoke too.
I was getting a bit concerned but it peaks out then passes
rather quickly.  This is at 500+ degrees so it is sort of like
the "self cleaning oven" concept I suppose.
I figure the first batch of beans acts like a "rock tumbler"
used to *polish* almost anything (even rocks).  If there is
any internal residue, the beans ought to pick it up or otherwise
help "break in" the new device.  After this first roast, I
cleaned the drum one more using Ron's suggested method and
then I deemed myself ready to "rock and roll".  Just didn't
want to poison anyone again, in my quirky little mind.
  well, you asked Gene!!...  It did look/smell sort of
good to me having once been weaned off of *$, and I looked at
over and over it for a whole day before tossing it.  :-)
Actually I shouldn't knock Vienna roasts at all.  Its an
early newbie habit is all..  All roasts have their place I'm
sure.
So what the heck is a "Cinnamon roast" I read about earlier?
Lighter than City I presume?
Allen
am

5) From: Allen Marsalis
At 09:51 PM 7/20/2004 -0700, Lesley Albjerg wrote:
<Snip>
Nodding, sorry Les for the rosewood handle peeking up behind
the Thor.  I didn't notice that until now and I really should
put that old tamper away now..  It doesn't fit the basket as
well and it wants to pivot to one side.  Like tamping with a
wrench or something..  
Allen
am

6) From: R.N.Kyle
snip:
<Snip>
Looks great Allen. The drum does need that cleaning and I actually pre wipe
it down with alcohol before shipping. But the manufacturing oils come from
the metal manufacture not me. I use no additional oil to make the drum. It
probably is a good Idea to toss the 1st batch for reasons you mentioned. I
have cleaned and roasted in several new drums during R&D and did drink the
coffee from the 1st batch with no problems. I would suggest that a low cost
coffee such as Columbian or Brazilian be used for the 1st try, or something
that you don't like so it doesn't bother you to toss the 1st. batch. It is
dishwasher safe of course.
great job and I know you will just get better with each attempt.
RK.

7) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 09:21 PM 7/20/2004, Allen Marsalis typed:
<Snip>
That is just  a beautiful roast !!!
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

8) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Jul 20, 2004, at 11:21 PM, Allen Marsalis wrote:
<Snip>
Allen,
     That is a beautiful roast, nobody would believe it was just the 
second try.   Mousetail is a wonderful color.  In your coffee bar I 
noticed your Silvia is a few inches from your sink.   I moved mine so 
the steam/hot water wand can point into the sink.  It is very handy for 
temperature surfing.   I just let the water run out the how water wand 
until the light comes on and then I "measure" the time until I pull the 
shot.
    Jim Gundlach

9) From: AlChemist John
Yes.  It is usually just out of 1 st crack.  It can be rather mottled, but 
does not have to be.  It really lets the varietal character show through, 
in addition to any roast defect as there the to "roast" flavor to cover it 
up.  It is usually to around 425 F in my book.  I remember the look on Les' 
face the time I took and aged Sumatra to cinnamon.  Ugly, but flavorful.
Sometime around 10:18 PM 7/20/2004, Allen Marsalis typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

10) From: miKe mcKoffee
Nice looking roast and nice coffee setup. When we remodeled the kitchen a
decade ago we didn't put in a 2nd sink. Regret it big time now! Been
seriously considering remodeling again adding another sink even though I
hate plumbing.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

11) From: Allen Marsalis
At 07:57 AM 7/21/2004 -0500, Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
 >
 >>  Tonight (my second
 >> attempt) I fell a bit short of the mark - A nice city roast.
 >
 >Allen,
 >     That is a beautiful roast, nobody would believe it was just the
 >second try.
Thanks Jim!  I would like to think it was pure skill  but I
would account for the success as follows:
33%  Experience from ~100 Rosto batches
33%  Good hardware and guidance from Ron and others
      (fast motor, and heavy drum really helps)
33%  Beginner's luck
Being "color blind" all of a sudden isn't nearly the handicap
that I thought it was going to be.  In fact, it forces an
increased awareness of things I might normally neglect like
smells, or the amount of smoke being produced.  But my main
2 tools seem to be my timer and thermometer.  I'm surprised
how "on cue" first crack is compared to Ron's notes.
 >Mousetail is a wonderful color.
I think that sounds better than "Moka Brown"..  Although
neither sounds Italian to me. (these cups are made in Italy)
I'm just wondering what Italians call that color.
 >In your coffee bar I
 >noticed your Silvia is a few inches from your sink.   I moved mine so
 >the steam/hot water wand can point into the sink.  It is very handy for
 >temperature surfing.   I just let the water run out the how water wand
 >until the light comes on and then I "measure" the time until I pull the
 >shot.
 >
Interesting idea.  I keep a couple of pitchers for surfing "run off"
purposes.  The only problem is that my sink is weird.  It has a platform
on the left side while the silvia's wand is on the right.  10 years ago,
the sink came with a small wood cutting board on the blank left side
but it warped right away and didn't last long.  But maybe someday I'll
have a new sink.  ;)
Thanks for the reply and kind words Jim.  It is really guys like
yourself who have taken the time and patience to answer many questions
who deserve credit for the good beans being produced by list members.
So it must be satisfying (at times) to see your efforts are not totally
in vain!  ;-)
And since I didn't scorch the Kona Peaberry last night, I think I'm
really to try the Aussie tonight.
Allen
am

12) From: Allen Marsalis
At 05:32 AM 7/21/2004 -0400, R.N.Kyle wrote:
 >
 >Looks great Allen. The drum does need that cleaning and I actually pre wipe
 >it down with alcohol before shipping. But the manufacturing oils come from
 >the metal manufacture not me. I use no additional oil to make the drum. It
 >probably is a good Idea to toss the 1st batch for reasons you mentioned. I
 >have cleaned and roasted in several new drums during R&D and did drink the
 >coffee from the 1st batch with no problems. I would suggest that a low cost
 >coffee such as Columbian or Brazilian be used for the 1st try, or something
 >that you don't like so it doesn't bother you to toss the 1st. batch. It is
 >dishwasher safe of course.
 >great job and I know you will just get better with each attempt.
 >RK.
Nodding, I'm often too wordy..  I could have simply replied to Gene
by saying "Ron's orders!!"  :-)  But I felt like explaining how
smokey/stinky that burn in period is.  Again, it is nothing against
the product at all.  Lots of products need a cleaning or break-in
period.
Allen
am

13) From: Allen Marsalis
At 05:54 AM 7/21/2004 -0700, AlChemist John wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks John!  After 24 hours of rest, I just pulled some shots
a few minutes ago.  I don't know how to describe taste yet,
and since both the roasting technique and beans are new to me,
it is hard to draw conclusions anyway.
I should roast a batch of more familiar beans to see if I can
taste a difference compared to an air roasted batch.  I wouldn't
say this is the best Kona I've ever had, but it is very good!
I sent Mike McKoffee 1/2 lb today of green Honaunau Peaberry and
I'm interested in his take on this bean.  I should have sent him
a small portion of this roast for comment as well and I would have
if I read these emails first.  Otherwise I would have never thought
of roasting for the king of kona on my first real attempt.
Allen
am

14) From: Allen Marsalis
At 09:56 AM 7/21/2004 -0700, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
 >Nice looking roast and nice coffee setup. When we remodeled the kitchen a
 >decade ago we didn't put in a 2nd sink. Regret it big time now! Been
 >seriously considering remodeling again adding another sink even though I
 >hate plumbing.
 >
For years, our "bar sink" has been little more than our "filtered
water dispenser".  The ice maker is near to the sink and runs off
the same 1 micron filter.  And I pretty much live on ice in the
summertime.
But now coffee had given new purpose to our "bar".  Little did I
know way back then that I would spend so much time in that spot
10 years later pulling shots..  One never knows what the future
might bring!
But as nice as my setup appears, I still need a knock box.  Its
always something isn't it?  I have been taking my PF over to the
other sink's "disposer" to get rid of the puck.  But after reading
Jim's recent post on the subject, I should use a knock box and
empty it into my compost pile.  I would like to cut into the
formica counter and recess the box which would be easy, but that
would require official clearance from my superior officer!  Hmm,
one step at a time!  :)
Allen
am

15) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
I read on a couple of composting websites that coffee grounds are an
effective ant control.  We had a bad ant infestation in our composter, and
they have not returned since I started sprinkling coffee grounds around the
outside edges of the composter.
I've also tried just covering any ant mounds that pop up with grounds.
Seems to work.  It's not an insecticide, but the ants seem to really, REALLY
dislike the coffee grounds and they disappear.
Anybody else ever try this use of coffee grounds?
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

16) From: GHHOLT
In a message dated 7/22/2004 8:35:12 AM Eastern Daylight Time, 
gene writes:
I read on a couple of composting websites that coffee grounds are an
effective ant control.  We had a bad ant infestation in our composter, and
they have not returned since I started sprinkling coffee grounds around the
outside edges of the composter.
I've also tried just covering any ant mounds that pop up with grounds.
Seems to work.  It's not an insecticide, but the ants seem to really, REALLY
dislike the coffee grounds and they disappear.
Anybody else ever try this use of coffee grounds?
That sounds good I've been fight the Fire Ant's all summer and I do have a 
bucket of grounds in the garage. I like to use them in my tomato garden.
George

17) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Jul 21, 2004, at 6:06 PM, Allen Marsalis wrote:
<Snip>
Allen,
     Will the Silvia fit on the platform?
          Jim Gundlach

18) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Jul 22, 2004, at 7:33 AM, Gene Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Nope,  but I just found our first fire ant mound and it is going to get 
coffee today.
          Jim Gundlach


HomeRoast Digest