HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Turkish (9 msgs / 280 lines)
1) From: Steve
Add water, then sugar, then coffee. On first foam-up, foam should "break
thru" and cover the top of coffee before overflowing...hopefully. The 2nd
and 3rd foam ups should just be the whole top rising...not a break thru of
foam, unless a break through didn't cover the coffee on the first foam up.
Let the coffee sit for 30 to 40 seconds after the last foam-up so the
grounds can settle to the bottom. If the foam doesn't cover the coffee
during the foam-ups, it'll never get saturated enough to settle to the
bottom. Some people stir...some don't. I try not to. If the grind isn't
consistently fine, there will be small "chunks" against the wall of your
cup. Either way there will be foam left on the top which should be
poured/split between cups. Somewhere I read that one who serves Turkish
coffee that doesn't have foam...loses face! For me, a target of 7 to 8
minutes to first foam-up works well since I don't like to have to try and
adjust the heat on an alcohol burner during mid brew. Any hotter/quicker and
I end up boiling the brew. Long ago someone {on this list} knew where to get
raw Cardamom/n. Chris S. {europachris} should have some good, Turkish,
Greek, "Ibrik brew" info. We did have a list member, Ian Swindale, who lives
on the Island of Crete, which is, I think, very close to Greece. He'd have
some good Ibrik brew info too. - Steve
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Brian Kamnetz
I broke in the ibik yesterday with used grounds and tried the real
thing this morning. I used 4 oz of water and 7 grams of coffee, and a
teaspoon (the kind you eat with, not the measuring size) of sugar. I
hauled out the old Krups whirlyblade grinder and smashed the beans for
about 15 secs, shaking constantly.
I put the water and sugar into the ibrik and stirred. I put it on the
heat until it began to boil and removed it, and added the coffee,
stirred, and put it back on the burner. It frothed up right away, and
I removed it from the head. After it settled I placed it back on the
heat, and it boiled but would not froth any more.
Of course, it is supposed to froth three times, and the froth is
supposed to be the best part.
Any suggestions?
Thanks,
brian

3) From: Stuart Krivis
I'm at work with a different e-mail address, so I can't post this to the list, but...
 
 I think I used to use more sugar than that. The coffee has to be a really fine powder.
 
 I boiled it 3 times, leaving it at boil each time only briefly. It always _did_ boil up each time.
 
 The froth? I didn't think it was really the best part. :-)
 
 The ibrik and coffee I used at first came from Turkey (someone brought them back from vacation for me), so I can vouch for it being a fine powder.
 
 Finally, I used to throw in a bit of ground cardamum seed.
 
 Yummy! :-)
 
Brian Kamnetz  wrote: I broke in the ibik yesterday with used grounds and tried the real
thing this morning. I used 4 oz of water and 7 grams of coffee, and a
teaspoon (the kind you eat with, not the measuring size) of sugar. I
hauled out the old Krups whirlyblade grinder and smashed the beans for
about 15 secs, shaking constantly.
I put the water and sugar into the ibrik and stirred. I put it on the
heat until it began to boil and removed it, and added the coffee,
stirred, and put it back on the burner. It frothed up right away, and
I removed it from the head. After it settled I placed it back on the
heat, and it boiled but would not froth any more.
Of course, it is supposed to froth three times, and the froth is
supposed to be the best part.
Any suggestions?
Thanks,
brian

4) From: Espressoperson
In a message dated 12/19/2005 10:43:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
bkamnetz writes:
Of course, it is supposed to froth three times, and the froth is
supposed to be the best part.
Any suggestions?
In my experience, once the water boils (big bubbles) there is no more chance 
of frothing. I've been perfecting this method of brewing ever since I started 
roasting my own coffee. It's a great way of using freshly roasted coffee. And 
if done right it's a great way of having any kind of coffee.
Try adding the coffee sooner, before it boils. I watch the surface and add 
the coffee when it is hot but not close to boiling. Then as it heats it looks 
like the coffee melts into the liquid. Then it starts to froth (small bubbles) 
around the edges and starts to rise up. Depending on heat, amount of coffee, 
amount of liquid, you get a feel for how high to let it rise the first time. Too 
much and the small bubbles turn to large and you are done :-(. Pull it off 
the flame when it is still frothing but looks like it might get more violent. 
Then let it sit off the flame till it all settles. Then when you move it back 
for the second froth, hold it up above the flame so you get a much gentler heat. 
It should froth again almost immediately, and if all is well, it will be even 
higher than the first time. Then off the flame to settle, and back high up 
over the flame for the third gentle heating to an even higher frothing. Let it 
sit for a minute or so, pour into a heated cup, and enjoy.
The trick for me is not to rush it. Don't try to do all the frothing or 
covering of the grinds in the first froth if it is going to boil before that 
happens. Get the rest on the second or third frothing.
There's always the tradeoff between wanting to heat the water quickly to get 
it started, and heating it gently to get maximum frothing without boiling. 
Luckily it is fun to walk this line between the two. And if you are using 
homeroast that you love, the results will taste good either way.
MichaelB

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
Wonderful help. Thanks very much! I am taking my Turkish stuff to my
sister's house in the next day or so and have already printed out your
suggestions to take along.
Brian
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6) From: Brian Kamnetz
"There's always the tradeoff between wanting to heat the water quickly
to get it started,"
I have an electric stove, and it is frustrating with a little heating
utensil like the ibrik to try to get a consistent, low-level heat with
the burner cycling off and on. It reminds me of trying to roast with a
popper with a bimetal strip still in it. I will be getting another
stove in February and I'm pretty sure it will be a gas stove.
Brian
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7) From: Ed Needham
Yeah...
Toss that one out.
Put the whole mixture, cold water, grounds and sugar on the stove on low to 
medium heat.  Bring it almost to a boil, but remove it as the mixture begins 
to rise.  Do that at least twice.  Three times is pushing it.  If it rises 
too high, rolls over and goes flat, toss it and start over.  It'll taste 
like swill.
Coffee must literally be a powder for it to work properly.  I'm not sure a 
whirly blade will be able to do that.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
*********************

8) From: Ed Needham
Life is too short to drink bad coffee.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] somewhere in the subject line of any email correspondence)
*********************

9) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks for the added tips. I think I see now, after giving Turkish a
whirl this morning, what you mean when you say "mixture begins to
rise".
I used the whirlyblade grinder after reading Tom's tip sheet. This is
from Tom's advice on Turkish:
"The coffee should be powderized ... that is, the finest grind
possible. (In fact, this is ONE thing that those whirling-blade type
grinders do fairly well)."
I have a couple of Zass grinders, but saw Tom's comment and decided to
drag the old whirlyblade grinder out of mothballs....
Brian
On 12/19/05, Ed Needham  wrote:
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