HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Newbie Roaster (32 msgs / 880 lines)
1) From: treynolds
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Hi All:
 
After reading about home roasting and being 
dissatisfied with what I was getting in the stores, both quality wise and price 
wise, I decided to follow the advice of some of the posters and jump 
in.
 
I when to a St. Vincent De Paul here in the area, 
and was about to leave when I spied a box on a lower shelf with a WB Poppery and 
instruction booklet.
 
It was half-price that day, so with tax I got it 
for $1.63.
 
I then when by another St. Vinnies and found a 
Fresh Roast in the box (no instructions) for $9.99.
 
I was walking on air. The Poppery is an old model 
from 1979, rated at 1600W. I checked the temperature with my Weber thermometer 
and it went all the way up to 485 degrees F. The Fresh Roast went up to 525 
degrees F. Both units were in good shape. The Poppery had the original box and 
instructions, and looked like it had been used only a few times and spent most 
of the last 22 years in storage. I had to take it apart to scrub some of the 
butter residue and glued a crack in the bakelite top trim ring with CA adhesive. 
This thing is HEAVY, built like a tank. The new ones are very light 
weight.
 
The Fresh Roast was also little-used, I suspect 
being given as a gift and then discarded when someone either ran out of the 
green beans that shipped with the unit and couldn't get more, or didn't like the 
smoky smell...
 
I have roasted with both and am very pleased with 
the results from each. I now use the Poppery to roast the bulk of the coffee and 
then roast smaller amounts in the Fresh Roast to "blend". I can get a "first 
crack" in the WB in about 3 minutes, outside with ambient air temp around 50 
degrees. I preheat the WB for a couple of minutes before starting. I can set the 
Fresh Roast on 5 and use the "dark" setting and definitely get a dark french 
roast in that amount of time. Neither of these units takes very long. Those 
posters who are having abnormally long roasting times with either may want to 
check their temps.
 
When done roasting, I rush the hot beans in a mesh 
strainer to my Jenn Air down draft vent and cool them that way. Very fast. I 
have been forced to roast outside, even though it's still cold here in Seattle. 
The Jenn Air just doesn't have enough "suck" to get the smoke outside from the 
upright machine.
 
From start to finish, enough coffee for 4 pots, 
ground, in a very short 10 minutes.
 
Thanks everyone for the fabulous information and 
for the encouragement to launch yet another hobby!
 
Now I have to find a vacuum coffee maker and a burr 
grinder...
 
Tony Reynolds

2) From: TFisher511
In a message dated 4/2/01 4:44:40 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
treynolds writes:
From start to finish, enough coffee for 4 pots, ground, in a very short 10 
minutes.
This sounds like a great start, and welcome to the wonderful world of hone 
roasting. It sounds like you may be grinding the beans immediately after 
roasting. Most of us grind only what we intend to brew right away and leave 
the rest as whole beans. They do stay fresh longer that way. 
I may have just interpreted the statement above the wrong way too. Either 
way, welcome Tony.
Terry F

3) From: Gerald Allen Green
Tony, welcome to our list!  Sounds like you lucked out with your
purchases.  I agree with Terry Fisher about waiting to grind the beans
until just before you want to use them; perhaps you already knew that.
About burr grinders, perhaps you'd have similar good luck in that
purchase.  I have two: one that's integral to my Gaggia Paros, and the
other a Solis 166.  Tom now sells the Solis 177 and says it's very
good.  Certainly I find the 166 to be a fine (no pun) grinder.  Its
slowness is hard to come by in a grinder, and also it doesn't produce as
much static electricity as many.  I found the vacuum maker to be too
much fuss for me.  Aside from espresso, I use Tom's Swiss Gold
one-cupper and a Bodum french press; with a crowd I use my Krups drip
system through a gold filter into a vacuum jug  Happy roasting! -- Jerry
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Ann Vanderlaan
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hello,
I am new to your list and Sweet Maria's. I just roasted my first beans 
this evening
-- amazing! I am using a switch-modded Poppery II. My first victims were the
*Colombian Nariņo del Abuelo* that I received Monday.
I know this is covered somewhere in yuor archives, but what is the 
proper method
of storing the green beans?
Thanx.
-- 
Ann          http://home.austin.rr.com/avanderlaan/                       
    _  Round Rock
 __| |_' "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little
 \_ * _}     temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
   \_(          -- Benjamin Franklin

5) From: Pamela Chadwick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Love the "victim" part and love your signature!
WELCOME!
Pam

6) From: msalwen
how do you get off the list, please unsubscribe me
thanks

7) From: Jerry Procopio
Ann,
Welcome to the list.  Right now I am storing my greens in cloth bags 
purchased from SM's.  I'm starting to get a little collection of beans 
so I may start vacuum storing them in jars using my Tilia FoodSaver.  
After roasting, and a rest period, I vacuum seal my roasted coffee in 
FoodSaver canisters.  So far, I've stored roasted beans as long as 13 
days and they remained fresh.  They may be good for longer, but they get 
used up.  It seems to be the consensus that greens should not be kept 
more than a year no matter what the storage method.
Good luck with your first cupping :)
Jerry
Ann Vanderlaan wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Tom Bellhouse
Hello, all.  I'm new to this game and enjoying it thoroughly, and
thought I'd share what little I have learned in the past few weeks of
roasting.
1.  I cannot roast well in a frying pan.  Somebody may be able to, and
cowboys may have been able to, but I tried while waiting for roaster
components and produced some of the world's worst cofee -- baked and
scorched, and unevenly roasted.  I also made the mistake of trying that
roast in the kitchen, and quickly decided that was a mistake!  Back to
waiting for components.
2.  I decided to go with the Stir Crazy/convection oven system.  I'm
well under $100 in "parts" and now have a gizmo that will evenly roast a
pound of beans in about 12 minutes.  I love it.  First roast was 1/2 lb
of Kenya AA, over-roasted.  Second try was right on, with the resulting
City roast greatly broadening my experience of "what coffee can be."
Wonderful!
3.  Successive roasts of 1/2 lb each proved consistently delicious.  All
the coffees (African) tasted best at a light City or City, with a range
of flavor that I really had never known cofee posessed!  I have just
gotten six more lbs, Western henisphere this time, and have only this
morning roasted a pound of Honduras Cup of Excellence "Nueve Posas."
This time it was to a "full City" and it was fantastic.  I'm sipping a
cup as I write.
I love the fact that all the senses are involved in using the StirCrazy
method. I can see the whole roasting process unfold, smell the batch as
it goes through its stages of development, and hear the beans in first
and second crack.  No instrumentation, not even a 550 degree thermometer
(but I want one, just so I can document my roasts and not have to repeat
mistakes.)
I'm in the foothills of the north Georgia mountains, and there aren't
many home roasters around here.  Maybe in Atlanta, but that's a couple
of very trafficky hours away from me.  So thanks to all of you, and to
SweetMarias, for sharing information that otherwise would be
unavailable.  I hope to return the favor as I gain experience.
Best regards,
Tom Bellhouse
Alto, GA

9) From: Ron Feroni
Tom,
       Wondering where you got your parts for your SC/TO roaster.  I'm 
currently trying to decide between a SC/TO, a drum style for the BBQ, or a 
homemade type drum roaster from scratch.  I like the idea of the SC/TO being 
pretty simple.  I was wondering also do you all that roast with the SC/TO's 
have them vented?  Which stircrazy, as I believe they come in two different 
sizes....
       I've only done about 12 roasts so far myself, on a poppery2.  I don't 
like it.  I'm already ready to upgrade!
happy roasting...
Ron
<Snip>

10) From: R.N.Kyle
Welcome there are some of use around each other
RK in Anderson SC Just 45min from Dillard, is that close to you

11) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Target (online) is having a special when you buy the "Super Turbo
Oven" and 6qt. Stir Crazy together (bottom of the webpage).
Here's the link: http://tinyurl.com/96vl4The logo on the "Super Turbo Oven" looks like it might be the
Sunpentown logo, but no ovens come up if you search for Sunpentown on
Target's sight.  The voltage and wattage on the Super is the same as
the Sunpentown, but the Super Turbo Oven is one that hasn't been
discussed.  Could just be rebranded by Target, but buyer beware.
The Stir Crazy should be the 6qt. size.  The SC/TO is best as an
outdoor roaster.  Some folks have rigged up boxes, etc. to roast
indoors and vent outdoors.   Hopefully they'll chiime in.
Brent
On 2/8/06, Ron Feroni  wrote:
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12) From: Aaron
Brent, I wonder if you can walk into the store and buy it.  since you 
can return it at any store, i wonder if they will honor the sale to walk 
in and buy.
ill go check out target tomorrow and see if i can see the thing first 
hand there and i can report back what kind it is exactly.  Ill even 
throw up a few pictures in case i am clueless and don't know what i am 
talking about so the ones who do know can correct me.
thanks for the url too,
Aaron

13) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Better look again, Brent.  Here's the Target "special" deal:
 Total List Price: $89.98
        Buy Together Today: 
        $89.98
Gene Smith
unimpressed with the discount, in Houston

14) From: Tom Bellhouse

15) From: Brent - SC/TO Roasting
Good point, Gene.  At www.newegg.com (supplier of the Sunpentown for
many of us), the price for the TO is $59.  It's here:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16896100203A post on another forum said that newegg had upped the price to $79,
so I thought the Target deal sounded good based on that.  My bad and
my apologies.  You can do better by shopping around.  Seems like $59
is the range for the TO, but you can get the Stir Crazy often on sale
for less than $29.99.
Brent
Impressed with the wisom of the list
On 2/8/06, Gene Smith  wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Aaron
so, for an average sized roast, how many ounces of beans can you do with 
the sc/to setup at a shot?

17) From: Bill Morgan
Interesting that Target associates the Stir Crazy with the Turbo Oven.
 Have enough people been buying the pair that they've noticed?
I picked up my Galloping Gourmet Turbo oven and a Stir Crazy at
various thrift stores.  The GG is more like 1400 watts.
1/2 pound batches are no problem, and some folks report doing up to a pound=
.
I roast in the garage with the door open.
HTH,
Bill
On 2/8/06, Brent - SC/TO Roasting  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Tom Bellhouse

19) From: B. Scott Harroff
I bought and tried a Sunpentown TO on the path to my FrankenTop.  If someone
wants a like new (two roasts) unit, for $50 plus shipping it's yours.

20) From: Mark Bartkowiak
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Brett,
    Definitely! My wife likes my homeroasted Bolivian or El Salvadorian =
far better than the 8 O-Schlock I used to buy for her. It's far easier =
to roast those a pound at a time in the MB/HG. I still roast my SM =
sample packs in the FR+8, 2 batches for her and one for me. The smaller =
batches lets me experiment with the roast levels without ruining too =
much coffee. I have found that we are drinking more coffee now but it =
usually a lighter roast than I used to buy. So I'm tasting some of the =
flavors Tom says are in there instead of the charcoaled robustas I used =
to buy.
Mark B. Midland, NC

21) From: Mark Bartkowiak
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Eddie
    Indoors it's a fiberglass cafeteria tray and outdoors it's a plastic =
gardening tub. I use them to raise the fan and allow the air to escape, =
since the fan in blowing down, sucking air through the hot beans.
Mark B. Midland, NC

22) From: Floyd Lozano
Which way is better, up and through or down and through?  I blow air up
through mine to blow out chaff, but maybe the other way would work too.  I
set my box fan upon a milk crate - well designed for the job!
-F
On 4/22/07, Mark Bartkowiak  wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Mark Bartkowiak
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Floyd,
    I have tried it both ways and I like the downdraft better. It seems =
to cool faster that way.
Mark B. Midland, NC

24) From: Jeff Hayden
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hello.
 
New to list.  New to roasting -- first batch was for Christmas dinner using
a popcorn maker.  I knew I was hooked from the start.
 
Been roasting with an IR2 since not long thereafter.  Now have two, as I
like experimenting with blending obscure combinations, and alternative ways
to brew.
 
I'd be very interested in the roasting curves other people use -- I found
that the roasting profiles for island beans just doesn't work consistently
with African beans, etc. -- as well as the blends other roasters have
experimented with.
 
Jeff 
 
hayden 

25) From: Eddie Dove
Welcome aboard, Jeff!
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 9/1/07, Jeff Hayden  wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: Stephen Carey
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Welcome Jeff.  I love the IR2, but only have 244 roasts.  I too found 
very different profiles for the Island beans with the African beans 
and the Central American beans.  I am getting the hang of it, but 
have a lot more roasting to do to get my profiles all set.  For now, 
if I can get close with the profiles, I will use my senses to tell me 
when to stop, should the need arise.
Again, welcome and I promise, you will get lots of help here.  The 
people here are amazing in their willingness to help.
All the best,
Stephen
At 05:18 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Welcome Jeff.  I love the IR2, but only have 244
roasts.  I too found very different profiles for the Island beans
with the African beans and the Central American beans.  I am getting
the hang of it, but have a lot more roasting to do to get my profiles all
set.  For now, if I can get close with the profiles, I will use my
senses to tell me when to stop, should the need arise.
Again, welcome and I promise, you will get lots of help here.  The
people here are amazing in their willingness to help.
All the best,
Stephen
At 05:18 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
 
Hello.
 
New to list.  New to roasting -- first batch was
for Christmas dinner using a popcorn maker.  I knew I was hooked
from the start.
 
Been roasting with an IR2 since not long
thereafter.  Now have two, as I like experimenting with blending
obscure combinations, and alternative ways to brew.
 
I'd be very interested in the roasting curves other
people use -- I found that the roasting profiles for island beans just
doesn't work consistently with African beans, etc. -- as well as the
blends other roasters have experimented with.
 
Jeff 
 

hayden 
--=====================_90137625==.ALT--

27) From: Stephen Carey
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That's 24 roasts, not 244 -sticky 4 key lately and no proofreading.
Stephen
At 05:18 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
That's 24 roasts, not 244 -sticky 4 key lately and no
proofreading.
Stephen
At 05:18 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
 
Hello.
 
New to list.  New to roasting -- first batch was
for Christmas dinner using a popcorn maker.  I knew I was hooked
from the start.
 
Been roasting with an IR2 since not long
thereafter.  Now have two, as I like experimenting with blending
obscure combinations, and alternative ways to brew.
 
I'd be very interested in the roasting curves other
people use -- I found that the roasting profiles for island beans just
doesn't work consistently with African beans, etc. -- as well as the
blends other roasters have experimented with.
 
Jeff 
 

hayden 
--=====================_90209031==.ALT--

28) From: Lynne Biziewski
Yeah - was thinking that you were drinking a LOT of coffee, since you only
started roasting a short time ago! (However, for 24 roasts, you are learning
very quickly, oh coffee-grasshopper)
On 9/1/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Robert Gulley
Whew! If it had been 244 and that was considered new to roasting, I 
was quickly losing any hope of moving beyond roasting idiot!! I have 
to whine - here I am, anxiously awaiting my roaster, and ups has it 
right here somewhere in the city, but I can't have it until Tuesday! Wah!!!!
Robert
At 07:00 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

30) From: Stephen Carey
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Thank you, Lynn.  Yeah, 244 would be a lot of coffee and would set 
new standards for being wired from caffeine.
I will say, that with the 24 roasts I am learning.  I received an 
email today from a friend and his partner to whom I had gifted about 
a half of a pound of Columbia Huila San Augustin Micro Lot.  They use 
the brewer in which you typically use pre-packaged little coffee 
packets.  I guess it makes okay coffee, there are a few of these on 
the market, but I have never had it.  These guys don't use the 
pre-packaged coffee, they typically buy one of the chains' coffee, 
grind it and make their own packets.  They did this with mine.  To be 
honest, I did three roasts that day of that bean and really needed 
more to dial it in perfectly.  But, I was close, or so I hoped.  I 
gave them the coffee, with the express instructions to be honest, for 
I need to know if I am to learn.  Now,  I did keep some for myself, 
but it was a separate roast, but would it give me an idea of how close I was.
Wow, in this email I received such nice compliments on the 
coffee.  First, for the act of roasting it and giving it away.  I 
didn't realize how much people would love that fact.  Then, they were 
very honest in their assessment.  It was all good.  They liked the 
first taste that hit their tongue and the slight after taste.  One 
loved it, the other was taken aback by coffee from Columbia not being 
so strong and tasting like "burned toast", which is what he said the 
coffee from this chain tasted like sometimes.  I can't speak for the 
chain, but I am really pleased that someone liked what I gave 
them.  I feel like I received the gift.  I actually roasted it and 
they liked it - I didn't know I could do such a thing.  I love this stuff.
Stephen
At 08:20 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Thank you, Lynn.  Yeah, 244 would be a lot of coffee
and would set new standards for being wired from caffeine. 
I will say, that with the 24 roasts I am learning.  I received an
email today from a friend and his partner to whom I had gifted about a
half of a pound of Columbia Huila San Augustin Micro Lot.  They use
the brewer in which you typically use pre-packaged little coffee
packets.  I guess it makes okay coffee, there are a few of these on
the market, but I have never had it.  These guys don't use the
pre-packaged coffee, they typically buy one of the chains' coffee, grind
it and make their own packets.  They did this with mine.  To be
honest, I did three roasts that day of that bean and really needed more
to dial it in perfectly.  But, I was close, or so I hoped.  I
gave them the coffee, with the express instructions to be honest, for I
need to know if I am to learn.  Now,  I did keep some for
myself, but it was a separate roast, but would it give me an idea of how
close I was.  
Wow, in this email I received such nice compliments on the coffee. 
First, for the act of roasting it and giving it away.  I didn't
realize how much people would love that fact.  Then, they were very
honest in their assessment.  It was all good.  They liked the
first taste that hit their tongue and the slight after taste.  One
loved it, the other was taken aback by coffee from Columbia not being so
strong and tasting like "burned toast", which is what he said
the coffee from this chain tasted like sometimes.  I can't speak for
the chain, but I am really pleased that someone liked what I gave
them.  I feel like I received the gift.  I actually roasted it
and they liked it - I didn't know I could do such a thing.  I love
this stuff.
Stephen
At 08:20 PM 9/1/2007, you wrote:
Yeah - was thinking that you
were drinking a LOT of coffee, since you only started roasting a short
time ago! (However, for 24 roasts, you are learning very quickly, oh
coffee-grasshopper)
On 9/1/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote:
That's 24 roasts, not 244 -sticky 4 key lately and no
proofreading.
--=====================_100025250==.ALT--

31) From: Lynne Biziewski
I think there are people on this list that have used some of those coffee
makers, doing just that - adding their homeroast instead of the prepackaged
coffee. As I remember, I think some mentioned that they don't get the coffee
hot enough. Or at least that's what I remember.
They use the brewer in which you typically use pre-packaged little coffee
<Snip>
 Isn't it cool? Now when my kids visit, they ask for coffee to bring back
home with them. My daughter's new boyfriend said (the first batch I roasted
for him) the coffee was incredible.
Love that kind of reaction!
Wow, in this email I received such nice compliments on the coffee.  First,
<Snip>
Keep up the good work!
: ) Lynne

32) From: Justin Marquez
It seems to me that a couple of years ago and earlier, when the package
arrived, UPS went ahead and dropped it off.  Now, if you pay the "Ground"
rate, you get the "Ground" delivery time, even if they happened to have
there much earlier.  I think it is their way on "encouraging" you to pop for
th extra cost for "2nd Day".  I find that a bit annoying, but I have
adjusted to it. On the other hand, it almost ensures that the delivery date
they project will be made so you know when to expect it.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 9/2/07, Robert Gulley <2bopen4all> wrote:
<Snip>


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