HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Hot Top filter (12 msgs / 285 lines)
1) From: alfred
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I ordered the stainless filters as suggested for the Hot Top.
They fit perfectly but I question their efficiency for this reason.
If you simply blow through the filter materal that is in there, the air =
passes through but with some resistance. 
If you blow through the stainless one there is no resistance at all.
In other words the stainless one lets a hellava lot more air through.
Maybe this isn't important but it does concern me.
Now, I don't believe that this has been discussed but the paper filter =
element that is in there looks like the same material used in automotive =
oil filters and/or air filters.
Why then not buy one and just cut a piece  to fit?
Why not buy an 

2) From: Michael Guterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
alfred wrote:
<Snip>
Alfred,  A number of people over on alt.coffee have done just that.  The 
black part can be washed and dried if you are VERY careful.  It likes to 
rip, but if washed with gentle hands and then just laid on paper towels 
to dry it can be re used.  The paper is, as you say, filter paper. 
Michael

3) From: Alexander C.Barton
I have been able to gently soak the black felt-like filter in a weak 
solution of Cafiza and it comes clean overnight and can be dried and 
reused with the S/S filter.  By the way, I have used a flat punch to 
slightly increase the rim size of the S/S filter at those points where =
the clips are in the plastic housing.  This keeps the (black felt/metal) =
filter sandwich in the original housing.
Connelley
in Rural Nebraska
On Saturday, September 4, 2004, at 01:25 PM, alfred wrote:
<Snip>
air 
<Snip>
<Snip>

4) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Alfred writes:
<Snip>
<Snip>
 
 
Any difference in the taste of the coffee?
 
-- Rick
 
 
----
Sierra Vista, AZ, 88F - 29%, Mostly Cloudy
Wind From the East at 9 mph (14:14:00)
Now Playing: Angelo Badalamenti - Sycamore Trees  1992
 
 

5) From: alfred
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Rick:
Haven't tried it yet but when I do it will be with two of the stainless =
filters sandwiched together in the holder with the lines crossed in each =
filter.
If you grind off the screw indents in the filter, they both fit nicely =
in the holder along with the filter cloth material.
It should work perfectly, I'll let you know.

6) From: Tim TenClay
I vaguely remember someone saying that it was possible to rinse out
the back-side filter for a hot-top and get a handful of more roasts
out of it...  Could someone confirm that for me (or deny it) :-)
Thanks!
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
-- 
The content of this e-mail may be private or of confidential nature.
Do not forward without permission of the original author.
--
Rev. Tim TenClay, IAPC, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com)
Personal Blog:http://www.tenclay.org/blog

7) From: Robert Avery
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Not sure everyone agrees with me on this .. but I do all my roasting out =
side and I don't even us a rear filter. Haven't done it for the 3 years =
I've owned the Hottop ... just blow it out from the one that get stuck =
in the rear plastic every once and awhile ... has never effected the =
heat or the roast process ... Later, Bob

8) From: Robert Joslin
Tim   I get lots of use out of Hot Top filters by cleaning them in the
following manner:
Using a square corning dish about 2 inches deep, I fill about halfway full
of tap water, add about 1/4 cup clorox bleach, place filter (do not remove
the pleated paper or fabric material from its plastic holder) in pan and add
some weight  to completely submerse the filter (I usually use the measuring
cup I used for bleach).  Go away and do something else for about 30 minutes
or longer.  When you return, remove the filter from the bleach solution,
rinse under running tap, then refill the corning dish with tap water and
allow the filter to soak for a few minutes.  Rinse again under running water
and THEN carry the filter to your top loading automatic washer, place
standing upright against outside edge of drum with the pleated filter side
facing the drum.  Dial in final spin and when the spin cycle is complete you
should have a bright, white, and only slightly damp filter that looks like
new.  Air dry in sun.  I have about four or five filters which I have
maintained in this manner for a couple of years.  I usually process two or
three filters at one time and disassembly of the filter prior to cleaning is
entirely unnecessary.                                   Cheers
Josh
On 2/19/07, Robert Avery  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Robert Joslin
P.S.   Rinse under a GENTLE stream of water.  A very strong stream of water
can damage the filter material even though it is supported by the plastic
frame.
On 2/19/07, Robert Joslin  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: McConnel
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I also roast outside  and I just took the filter material out of the =
frame. I also removed the top filter. I regularly do 300 grams at temps =
near freezing without any problems.
After 800 roasts, I don't see enough smoke mitigation to make the hassle =
and expense worth it for outdoors anyway.
  Not sure everyone agrees with me on this .. but I do all my roasting =
out side and I don't even us a rear filter. Haven't done it for the 3 =
years I've owned the Hottop ... just blow it out from the one that get =
stuck in the rear plastic every once and awhile ... has never effected =
the heat or the roast process ... Later, Bob

11) From: MichaelB
Tim,
The Hottop manual says to replace the filter after 30-40 uses.
Tom says. "HotTop recomends relacing these every 20 roasts [sic]. I
personally have washed them clean, dried them thoroughly, and kept on
roasting for a longer than 20 roasts. Really, the machine produces a lot of
smoke even with a fresh filter in there. So why not just roast without a
filter? Because it changes the way heat is cycled through the roaster ... so
keep the filter in there, and make sure it's in reasonably good shape.
Ignore discoloration, avoid too much build-up on it. If the roaster is
getting too hot - ejecting roasts before they are programmed to end, it
could be that you need a new filter."
MichaelB says. I roast indoors (in front of a window with a three
speed exhaust fan) so change filters regularly. After 20 roasts I take
the filter out of the holder, flip top to bottom, replace in holder and use
for another 20 roasts. Then toss it and put in a brand new one. Cost: 25
cents per roast.
On 2/19/07, Tim TenClay  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

12) From: raymanowen
My filter on the heat gun is a nylon hose covering the intake. Cost per
hundred roasts = $0.00 and it never gets plugged up.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
AHIP - Altitude Has Its Privileges. Water boils at 200 F here (5413ft ne=
ar
Denver town)
On 2/19/07, MichaelB  wrote:
<Snip>
of
<Snip>
 so
<Snip>
se
<Snip>
ttings
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


HomeRoast Digest