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Topic: AGED BEANS?? (5 msgs / 142 lines)
1) From: Bob Holland
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I purchased the sampler from Tom about 18 months ago but never 
got around to playing with my Popper and the beans. I notice that many of the 
samples show a 98/99 crop label. I have been storing them in the nice little 
cotton bags in the dark of the garage.
 
How will this inadvertant aging affect the roast and or taste. 
I tend to like a dark roast and now have my WB I tuned up to the "Charbucks" 
potential!  My first try at the Costa Rican Tarrazu turned out well, 
stopping just into the 2nd crack.
 
Bob

2) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
From: "Bob Holland" 
Subject: +AGED BEANS??
Date: Thu, 12 Apr 2001 19:02:31 -0000
<Snip>
Perhaps ok if you haven't exposed it to any harsh condition.
<Snip>
Aged beans are usually easier to roast, but be careful.
I don't know how you modified your popper but if you try to dark roast
quickly by applying a high temperature from the beginning, you're
likely to make a dark looking coffee with bitter beany flavor.  (This
is one thing I found by carefully monitoring the temperature of my
oven. When I roasted at a local cafe years ago I never thought about
it -- everything was perfectly set up for their business and I was
just following what they did.)
R
--
Ryuji Suzuki
Q. What is your real message?
A. Keep a good head and always carry a light bulb. (Bob Dylan 1965)
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3) From: coffenut
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Bob,
 
I've 
wondered about the life of stored beans too, but haven't managed to amass any 
inventory longer than 6 months.  I keep them in cloth bags that I got from 
Tom and in an interior closest where the climate is a bit more stable than my 
garage would be.  The only problem is that the closet has become known to 
my family as my "coffee bean" closet because is smells like green beans.  I 
kinda like it though.
 
Coffenut  :^)

4) From: jim gundlach
Re: +AGED BEANS??
on 4/12/01 2:02 PM, Bob Holland at BOBHOLLAND wrote:
I purchased the sampler from Tom about 18 months ago but never got around to playing with my Popper and the beans. I notice that many of the samples show a 98/99 crop label. I have been storing them in the nice little cotton bags in the dark of the garage.
 
How will this inadvertant aging affect the roast and or taste. I tend to like a dark roast and now have my WB I tuned up to the "Charbucks" potential!  My first try at the Costa Rican Tarrazu turned out well, stopping just into the 2nd crack.
 
Bob
Bob,
   It depends on the conditions in your garage.  If humidity is relatively low you are probably ok.  However, if I did that in warm and damp Alabama, they would be well gone by now.  In general actual ageing as a desirable process requires ideal conditions and a lot of attention.
   Jim Gundlach
     Roasting over pecan wood fire
     in Shorter, Alabama

5) From: Ryuji Suzuki -- JF7WEX
From: jim gundlach 
Subject: Re: +AGED BEANS??
Date: Fri, 13 Apr 2001 09:50:36 -0500
<Snip>
Humidity too low will probably damage the flavor too.
I am wondering how I can create ideal condition for aging coffee.
In recent studies wine aging seems to be much less sensitive to
humidity despite the long standing dogma. It sounds reasonable because
all it can affect is the cork, whose surface is mostly covered by
glass and the seal (usually with a few tiny holes though), or in
contact with fluid. But I think coffee can be more picky about the
environment.
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"Slow but steady wins the race." (anonymous, 19c.)
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