HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Pecan Jim (25 msgs / 962 lines)
1) From: Bob Baker
Jim,
Would be you so kind to share your spiced pecan formula?
I still have about 10lbs in the freezer from last fall, and looks like  
right
now we're going to have a bumper crop this year...
I'm still going to post my wife's pecan pie recipe (the one with 5 cups of  
nuts).
Thanks,
Bob/Dallas

2) From: jason molinari
yeah please post the pecan pie recipe!!@!
jason
--- Bob Baker  wrote:
<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast<Snip>http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

3) From: Daniel Newton
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Is Jim still actively participating on this mailing list?  Its been a while
for me.frequent reader before but rarely posted.  Just wondering because he
always seemed to have good info.

4) From: Bill Morgan
Oh, he pokes his nose out of his burrow every now and then, but not at
all regularly.  I miss him, too.
Here's something else he's been up to lately:http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/14/sports/ncaafootball/14auburn.htmlThe man gets around...
On 7/14/06, Daniel Newton  wrote:
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5) From: Daniel Newton
Bill,
That is the article I was wondering about.  That is our Jim there?
Interesting.  Wonder if he would feel free to talk to us about his new found
fame in the national media... :)

6) From: jim gundlach
Yes, this is one of the things that has limited my list time, as well  =
as the ability to take time to research what I have to do to tune the  =
Andreja.  It has been a trying day, so far 44 hate e-mails compared  
to 28 supportive.  On the bright side, no death threats yet. Lot of  
media requests I am generally not talking to TV or radio and I am  
limiting print media to those willing to take time to understand the  
whole complex mess.  The Times article is accurate but only has about  =
80% of the story.
    Also, we got a harassing phone call a few minutes ago that  
consisted of a white guy faking an about 1930’s style fake black  
dialect asking me to put his love child Tyrone in a directed readings  =
class.
I've been examining the hate-email. I find it ironic that 21 of the  
current 44 hate mail messages where the writer is unhappy with my  
reporting academic dishonesty are deceptive in that they have a  
subject line that pretends to be supportive or something like  
“homework”.   In other words, they are in effect being dishonest in  =
the labeling of their expression of contempt and hate for me  
reporting dishonesty.
Spent about four hours with a couple of reporters this morning and  
introduced them to home roasted coffee.  It really helped me make my  
case with them I think one of them is seriously thinking about trying  =
it.  Sent him home with the Sweet Maria's web address.
Pecan Jim
On Jul 14, 2006, at 10:50 PM, Daniel Newton wrote:
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7) From: Daniel Newton
Jim,
Sounds like a miserable time for you.  Hope you and your family remain safe.
If you don't mind me asking what did the NYT leave out of the story?  Sounds
like an interesting situation going on down there, defiantly not flattering
for the school.  Again, hope you are safe and can hang on to your sanity.

8) From: Bill Morgan
Hey Jim,
Add another one into the support column here.  It's really refreshing
these days to hear of someone doing the right thing in a situation
like this.
Can you tell if the majority of the hate mail comes specifically from
Auburn fans, or more generally from those who believe that the true
mission of a university is to field a winning football team and that
all academic issues are secondary?  Lord know we have plenty of those
around UT Austin, where I work.
Was the faculty member involved getting compensated extra for his
supposed teaching load, or just a football fan?  This sounds like the
kind of thing that would require at least tacit approval from higher
up.  How are the Department Chair and/or Dean taking this?  (If these
questions seem too sensitive for a public list, feel free to reply
privately or just ignore them.)
Anyway, it's great to hear from you, whatever the context.  Keep up
the good work!
Regards,
Bill
On 7/14/06, jim gundlach  wrote:
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9) From: Bill Morgan
I just went back to look at the article again and realized that I had
only ready the first couple of pages.  The answers to my questions
were right there in the rest of the story.
I give myself a D on this reading assignment.  :-)
Dimly,
Bill
On 7/15/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
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10) From: Michael Wascher
Unless you're an athlete, then it'd be at least a B+
On 7/15/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

11) From: Daniel Newton
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I don't know Michael, I read the article and didn't read anything relating
to preferential treatment for athletes.  It did sound as if the classes were
easy A's or B's, but that was for all students not athletes.  Seems like
there are these types of courses at all Universities.  I certainly know
there were some where I went.
My apologies for the lack of coffee content in these posts.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Wascher
Sent: Saturday, July 15, 2006 11:54 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: Re: Re: +Pecan Jim
Unless you're an athlete, then it'd be at least a B+
On 7/15/06, Bill Morgan  wrote: 
I just went back to look at the article again and realized that I had
only ready the first couple of pages.  The answers to my questions 
were right there in the rest of the story.
I give myself a D on this reading assignment.  :-)
Dimly,
Bill
On 7/15/06, Bill Morgan  wrote: 
<Snip>-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce 

12) From: Sean Cary
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Back in the day - I was a TA for a class called "Exceptional People" at the
University of Fl.  Had Emmit Smith and about 30 others Football folks,
Livingston Chapman the current B Ball star center for UF.  Class was pretty
much attendance only, if you had a pulse and made it to class, you got a B.
If you did the projects, you got an A.  
 
There are other classes like that at UF and all the other schools I attended
(I went to three schools before graduating at UF.I had, er "academic
challenges" back then - most of them 12 oz. Or  90 proof - I do have many
fond yet somewhat blurry memories of my college years). 
 
Sean M. Cary
Major USMC
Tempus Fugit - Memento Mori  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Daniel Newton
Sent: Sunday, July 16, 2006 1:39 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: Re: Re: +Pecan Jim
 
I don't know Michael, I read the article and didn't read anything relating
to preferential treatment for athletes.  It did sound as if the classes were
easy A's or B's, but that was for all students not athletes.  Seems like
there are these types of courses at all Universities.  I certainly know
there were some where I went.
My apologies for the lack of coffee content in these posts.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Wascher
Sent: Saturday, July 15, 2006 11:54 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: Re: Re: +Pecan Jim
 
Unless you're an athlete, then it'd be at least a B+
On 7/15/06, Bill Morgan  wrote: 
I just went back to look at the article again and realized that I had
only ready the first couple of pages.  The answers to my questions 
were right there in the rest of the story.
I give myself a D on this reading assignment.  :-)
Dimly,
Bill
On 7/15/06, Bill Morgan  wrote: 
<Snip>-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce 

13) From: Steve Hay
On 7/16/06, Sean Cary  wrote:
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t
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ks,
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I do
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Sorry for continuing this off-topic thread.  I just wanted to say my piece
about this situation.  I've fairly recently graduated from college.  While =
I
was there I tried to learn as much as I could and was surrounded by many
other people doing the same.  Of course, college students don't have the
reputation for being studious, it seems, anymore.  Instead, college is
(turning in to?) a less-supervised extension of high school.  And once out,
big surprise, the job market reflects this devaluation of higher education
and lowering of standards.
I don't think situations like this help at all.  School should be about
learning, first and foremost.  College should a place where studying is
one's responsibility and JOB.  If students approached college this way,
maybe as a whole we'd be taken more seriously.  Instead, institutions of
higher learning are more and more being thought of as places of refuge for
people who couldn't cut it in the real world, and a college education means
less and less to an employer over someone with actual job skills.  After
all, why should someone get hired because they went to a place that allowed
them to party and skate for four years before joining the real world?  It
just kind of sickens me, to be honest.
As for the academic sheltering of college athletes, I think the universitie=
s
that do this are self-serving and neither thinking about their primary
purpose nor the poor students that don't make it into the pros.  Personally=
,
I think whoever exposes such blatantly unethical behaviour should be
praised.  No one should be handed a college degree unless they've earned
it.  It cheapens it for the rest of us who worked hard to get it, and it
makes it harder for employers to separate the wheat from the chaff.
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

14) From: Daniel Newton
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Again, apologies for continuing the thread, but it is an interesting subject
and we have a member who has first hand knowledge.  I agree with Steve that
this is cheapening the value of a college degree.  Students these days want
to obtain their degree in the easiest fashion possible, and that is
unfortunate.  When reading this article it reminded me of a program that was
played on ESPN 4-5 years ago about this very same matter.  Duke was one of
the programs that was found to have a large number of these IS classes.  I
also remember an article in the Dallas paper recently (December perhaps)
where a couple of players at the University of Alabama talked about an IS
class they took worth 5-6 hours that consisted of a 5 page paper (if I
remember correctly).  Now that is a tragedy, 6 hours credit for 5 pages.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Steve Hay
Sent: Sunday, July 16, 2006 1:32 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: Re: Re: +Pecan Jim
On 7/16/06, Sean Cary  wrote:
Back in the day - I was a TA for a class called "Exceptional People" at the
University of Fl.  Had Emmit Smith and about 30 others Football folks,
Livingston Chapman the current B Ball star center for UF.  Class was pretty
much attendance only, if you had a pulse and made it to class, you got a B.
If you did the projects, you got an A.  
There are other classes like that at UF and all the other schools I attended
(I went to three schools before graduating at UF.I had, er "academic
challenges" back then - most of them 12 oz. Or  90 proof - I do have many
fond yet somewhat blurry memories of my college years). 
Sorry for continuing this off-topic thread.  I just wanted to say my piece
about this situation.  I've fairly recently graduated from college.  While I
was there I tried to learn as much as I could and was surrounded by many
other people doing the same.  Of course, college students don't have the
reputation for being studious, it seems, anymore.  Instead, college is
(turning in to?) a less-supervised extension of high school.  And once out,
big surprise, the job market reflects this devaluation of higher education
and lowering of standards. 
I don't think situations like this help at all.  School should be about
learning, first and foremost.  College should a place where studying is
one's responsibility and JOB.  If students approached college this way,
maybe as a whole we'd be taken more seriously.  Instead, institutions of
higher learning are more and more being thought of as places of refuge for
people who couldn't cut it in the real world, and a college education means
less and less to an employer over someone with actual job skills.  After
all, why should someone get hired because they went to a place that allowed
them to party and skate for four years before joining the real world?  It
just kind of sickens me, to be honest. 
As for the academic sheltering of college athletes, I think the universities
that do this are self-serving and neither thinking about their primary
purpose nor the poor students that don't make it into the pros.  Personally,
I think whoever exposes such blatantly unethical behaviour should be
praised.  No one should be handed a college degree unless they've earned it.
It cheapens it for the rest of us who worked hard to get it, and it makes it
harder for employers to separate the wheat from the chaff. 
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it." 

15) From: Michael Wascher
I must say there are abuses for other reasons too. I had a class where the
prof let you choose:
   1. Two papers, completely researched & cross-referenced one 5 pages &
   the other 15 pages, and an oral presentation to the class;
   2. Proof-read a chapter of the profs new book & double check the
   citations & cross-references.
The class was crap, as was the new book & the required text for the class
(also written by the prof). I chose option 2 & avoided that particular prof
forevermore.
On 7/16/06, Daniel Newton  wrote:
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-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

16) From: raymanowen
Note- Jim is leaving the school- it's not a small thing to dissociate
oneself from such a fiasco.
"...this is cheapening the value of a college degree.  Students these days
want to obtain their degree in the easiest fashion possible, and that is
unfortunate."
Auburn Student Financial Services estimates this year's cost at $27,000.
Send 'em to Mines. There's Foss Drug Store and maybe a SCSI cofee shop -ro
On 7/16/06, Daniel Newton  wrote:
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-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

17) From: fs
Jim:
off topic but just read about "yet another Auburn mess"....Kudos for your 
fortitude! That's got to have taken a toll on you so take care of yourself 
and don't let them  victimize you.
Add me to your list of positive emails and if you need another 50 people to 
congratulate your ethics I'll start rounding them up immediately.....
take care
Fred Shipley
Oregon (not EVEN ready to see what's under the hood of the U of  O football 
program....)

18) From: Gregg Talton
I'm surprised that there's not a class in Shugology down on the plains and a
class in Bearology at the Capstone. Football in Alabama is a religion.  Has
Tubby had any response?  I read that you are retiring - staying in Alabama?
Okay, now the obvious joke - are they using Lowder's jet to travel and
interview for your replacement?
I'm sure you will be missed.  Thanks for doing what's right.
Oh, to bring coffee to this - I started drinking premium coffee while in
college at the U of Montevallo back in the mid eighties.
Gregg

19) From: Rob Richardson
Now the Gray Lady has weighed in:http://tinyurl.com/pe26m

20) From: Jared Andersson
On 7/14/06, jim gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
Jim I think you are nobel and brave.  I am proud to know you.  Jared

21) From: David Schooley
--Apple-Mail-3-911641332
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I guess the sad thing about this is that UF is in many ways an  
excellent institution, although most of us think of the school in  
terms of football or basketball. I did not go to school there, but it  =
was on my list of prospective graduate schools when I was going down  
that road. I ended up at Georgia Tech instead.
Back to the original off-topic-ness... I understand what Jim is going  =
through. I lived in Birmingham for a while and I have family there.  
The state is football mad, and it often seems that the biggest and  
most troublesome fans for both Auburn and the University of Alabama  
did not attend either school.
My mother did some time on the admissions committee at Samford  
University, which is a small Baptist school, in Birmingham. The  
number of applications jumped after Samford went to the final or semi- =
final game for the football championship of whatever NCAA division  
they are in. The football coach at the time was Terry Bowden, who  
later had his day at Auburn.
Finally, Dexter Manley wrote a book titled _Educating_Dexter_ about  
his time at Oklahoma State.  He was illiterate when he completed his  
eligibility. No, he did not graduate, and he had some help writing  
the book. My mother was teaching at Oklahoma State at the time, and  
Dexter was in one of her classes. It was some sort of Introduction to  =
Management class and she gave multiple-choice tests. Dexter knew to  
go for classes with multiple-choice exams because he could guess at  
the answers without needing to read the questions. An exam from my  
mother's class is used as an exhibit in the book. Dexter received a  
"D". Dexter lays much blame at the feet of OSU, and while the  
University was not blameless, Dexter readily admits that he cheated  
his way though many of his classes. I enjoyed watching Dexter play  
football, but he never should have been allowed on campus.
Anyway, back to coffee...
[I originally sent this yesterday, but it bounced.]
On Jul 16, 2006, at 11:58 AM, Sean Cary wrote:
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I guess the = sad thing about this is that UF is in many ways an excellent = institution, although most of us think of the school in terms of = football or basketball. I did not go to school there, but it was on my = list of prospective graduate schools when I was going down that road. I = ended up at Georgia Tech instead.  Back to the original off-topic-ness... I understand = what Jim is going through. I lived in Birmingham for a while and I have = family there. The state is football mad, and it often seems that the = biggest and most troublesome fans for both Auburn and the University of = Alabama did not attend either school.My mother did some time on the = admissions committee at Samford University, which is a small Baptist = school, in Birmingham. The number of applications jumped after Samford = went to the final or semi-final game for the football championship of = whatever NCAA division they are in. The football coach at the time was = Terry Bowden, who later had his day at Auburn. Finally, = Dexter Manley wrote a book titled _Educating_Dexter_ about his time at = Oklahoma State.  He was illiterate when he completed his eligibility. = No, he did not graduate, and he had some help writing the book. My = mother was teaching at Oklahoma State at the time, and Dexter was in one = of her classes. It was some sort of Introduction to Management class and = she gave multiple-choice tests. Dexter knew to go for classes with = multiple-choice exams because he could guess at the answers without = needing to read the questions. An exam from my mother's class is used as = an exhibit in the book. Dexter received a "D". Dexter lays much blame at = the feet of OSU, and while the University was not blameless, Dexter = readily admits that he cheated his way though many of his classes. I = enjoyed watching Dexter play football, but he never should have been = allowed on campus.  Anyway, back to coffee... [I originally sent this yesterday, = but it bounced.]
On Jul 16, 2006, = at 11:58 AM, Sean Cary wrote:

Back in the day – I was a TA = for a class called “Exceptional People” at the University of …  Had = Smith and about 30 others Football folks, Livingston Chapman the current = B Ball star center for UF.  = Class was = pretty much attendance only, if you had a pulse and made it to class, = you got a B.  If you did the projects, you = got an A. 

There are other classes like = that at UF and all the other schools I attended (I went to three schools = before graduating at UF…I had, er “academic challenges” back then = – most of them 12 oz. Or  90 proof – I do have many fond yet somewhat blurry memories = of my college years).


22) From: Barbara C. Greenspon
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jim, you are courageous and inspiring.  Thank you.
Barbara
Jared Andersson wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: rnkyle
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Way to go Jim, good luck in you quest for better student athletes.
I know that football is a the major money maker for colleges and some of =
these athletes attending would never make it as scholars, but could very =
well make it as pro athletes,
I think they should have a chance to make it to the pros on there =
athletic abilities, and College is great place to showcase their =
talents. I'm not sure but believe they should be allowed to play but =
don't give them degrees if they can't earn it on their own abilities, =
maybe a certificate of attendance but not a degree. This would at least =
give them a chance to make it at the pro level 
RK

24) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
Standing firm for what is right isn't always easy. What we see as
morally wrong others don't see as wrong because they can only see the
benefits of their desires.
Yes, football is a big financial asset to most colleges and universities,
and it's great for recruitment when an alumni makes it in the NFL, but if
you turn out a man who can't even sign his own name to a check....Education
HAS to be the top priority of our schools. America CAN"T AFFORD to loss
ground to the rest of the world in education.
So from a die hard SOONER FAN....Keep on the Path of Doing What is Right.
...BOOMER....SOONER.... and whatever the Auburn folks say...Oh and the
coffee thing...I am brewing a blend of 2/3 Ethiopia Harrar Horse Lot #19
with 1/3 Guatamala Heuhuetanago. Keep on Topic AND Coffee related.
Terry T
On 7/20/06, rnkyle  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...

25) From: Angelo
I have to agree with Ron. And to add to that thought, if the money 
from sports is what funds the colleges, the players should be 
considered "fund-raisers", and should be paid for their services in 
cold, hard cash. In effect, they are being paid by all the 
"inducements"  and concessions being made to them so that they will 
play for that college, and not another. If they want to get a degree, 
or credits toward a degree while they are at the college, fine...They 
can pay for it from their earnings and take their chances in the 
classes like any other student. Besides, they could always go to 
college after they have amassed their fortune from entertaining the 
hordes. They could "attend" one of the many institutions of higher 
learning where you pays your money and you gets your degree...
I blame the hypocrisy involved in trying to say that these are 
students first. We finally allowed pros to play in the Olympics. 
Maybe,this will be the next step....
A+
<Snip>


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