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Topic: Triple Melange - Nicaragua Cup of Exc. Coop 15 (3 msgs / 81 lines)
1) From: Jeff Oien
I've been thinking about what would be a good coffee for a triple roast 
melange - same bean roasted to three levels. I'm thinking 25% City/+, 
50% Full City+/+, 25% Vienna+. Theoretically it looks like Nicaragua Cup 
of Exc. Coop 15 de Septiembre would be a good one but I don't have it.http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.central.nicaragua.html#nicCoE15deSeptAnybody want to try or has anybody done this yet? You need to like dark 
roasts or it would be pretty pointless. I would think some African 
varieties would be good for this but I don't like them in general. 
Anything that tastes pretty different at different roast levels and can 
handle a dark roast.
JeffO

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
I believe many greens can make a very good triple mélange roast. In fact, in
our roast swap of Peruvian Norte last April I'd been out of town and didn't
have a chance to do any test roasts before roasting to send. So I did a
lighter triple mélange City, City+/Light FC & FC just barely the edge of
2nd. Varying finish by 10f each end of roast 430, 440 & 450f. Turned out
quite well. In fact, that's about how today's single pound batch PM Kona wok
roast turned out! (though overall slightly lighter)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

3) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
And I've been wondering if anybody has tried getting around the weight limit 
on smaller air roasters by doing something like this all in the same 
roast...
What I mean is, you put in (X) amount of beans, and when they have lightened 
a bit and are jumping around you add some more...essentially bogging the 
airflow back down to what it was when the first beans were started.
Seems like if you could do it twice, you could do it three times (assuming 
it would work at all) and end up with a melange roast larger than you could 
normally manage in the same amount of time.
Or...
What if your 'sequential' melange roast consisted of three different beans, 
staggered so that you would start with the beans requiring the longest 
roast, followed by another one (or two) that roast faster...so they all end 
up finishing at the same time?
I haven't done enough roasting to even hazard a guess on what beans might 
work with the second method.  Can anyone suggest a likely duo (or trio) of 
beans that would fit the above description?  It would be better, of course, 
if the suggested beans actually tasted good together!
I just discovered that I had hidden a pound or two of el cheapo beans from 
myself that I bought to practice on when I first started roasting.  I 
probably won't have time tomorrow, because I need to prepare for an evening 
gig, but I will definitely try the first option with some of those beans and 
see if I can trick my little Aromaroast into roasting more than it thinks it 
can!
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston


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