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Topic: More Vac seal Questions (9 msgs / 213 lines)
1) From: George Holt
When you vac seal a roast as soon as it cools.  Does it continue to
degas under vacuum? Once you open the roast does it go thru a degasing
period? Should I let my roast rest after vac sealing?
-- 
Living Large In Waxhaw, NC.
George Holt

2) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
Actually, it will degas more rapidly, since the process is now vacuum
assisted.  Dan

3) From: Wandering John
You can seal them as soon as they are cool.   You will find that the
brick hard bag becomes a pillow over the next several days.  That is
the captured gas - and you will get the same "whoosh" of great smells
when you open the bag as you used to opening a can of coffee - except
this is the way it really is going to taste.
John - Tar Heel gone bad - loving life in the slow lane
On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 08:11:42 -0500, George Holt  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Allen Marsalis
At 08:35 AM 11/13/2004 -0500, Dan Bollinger wrote:
 >> When you vac seal a roast as soon as it cools.  Does it continue to
 >> degas under vacuum?
 >
 >Actually, it will degas more rapidly, since the process is now vacuum
 >assisted.  Dan
 >
Would this speed up or affect the "sulking period" in any way?
Or is sulking not really gassing but a true time relation?
Allen
am

5) From: Rick.Farris
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At 08:35 AM 11/13/2004 -0500, Dan Bollinger wrote:
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
First, it degases more rapidly, but not very much more.  I don't have the
citation handy, but somebody with one of those big Illy (I think) books
looked up the chemical reaction and any effect added by the vacuum was a
second or third order effect.  In other words, more like 1% faster than 10%
faster.
There is some evidence that during the sulking period (and before, and
after), there are chemical reactions going on, so it's not just a matter of
getting the CO2 out.
-- Rick
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RE: +More Vac seal Questions

At 08:35 AM 11/13/2004 -0500, Dan Bollinger = wrote: >> When you vac seal a roast as soon as it = cools.  Does it continue to >> degas under vacuum? > >Actually, it will degas more rapidly, since the = process is now vacuum >assisted.  Dan   > Allen Marsalis asks: > Would this speed up or affect the "sulking = period" in any way? > Or is sulking not really gassing but a true = time relation?

First, it degases more rapidly, but not very much = more.  I don't have the citation handy, but somebody with one of = those big Illy (I think) books looked up the chemical reaction and any = effect added by the vacuum was a second or third order effect.  In = other words, more like 1% faster than 10% faster.

There is some evidence that during the sulking period = (and before, and after), there are chemical reactions going on, so it's = not just a matter of getting the CO2 out.

-- Rick

***************************************************************= *********** The information transmitted herewith is sensitive = information intended only for use by the individual or entity to which = it is addressed. If the reader of this message is not the intended = recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, retransmission, = dissemination, distribution, copying or other use of, or taking of any = action in reliance upon this information is strictly prohibited. If you = have received this communication in error, please contact the sender = and delete the material from your computer.


6) From: Allen Marsalis
At 08:40 AM 11/15/2004 -0800, Rick.Farris wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks Rick.  I was just wondering if vac sealing right after roasting
might be a useful technique to speed up the sulking process when in a
pinch.  This happens to me when it rains on a roasting day and I find
myself off track.  It would be nice to be able to get that 48 hour
taste after 24 hours but somehow I knew that wasn't going to happen.
Coffee is probably like whiskey, wine, etc. where there is no substitute
for time, aging, etc.  Just like there is no real way to get that 48 hour
taste after 24 weeks!
Allen
am

7) From: John Blumel
On Nov 15, 2004, at 10:58pm, Allen Marsalis wrote:
<Snip>
It's been noted previously on the list that heat will accelerate the 
resting/staling process. (Just as freezing will slow it.) So, you could 
experiment with storing the beans at higher than 'room' temperature for 
the first 24 hours. I don't recall whether there were any negative side 
effects reported from temporarily accelerating the process but there 
may be an optimal rate.
John Blumel

8) From: Oaklandguy
Here's a paper about coffee and degassing from a prof at the Univ. of
Minnesota.  33 pages in PDF format.  Entitled "Degassing kinetics and
sorption equilibrium of carbon dioxide in fresh roasted and ground coffee".http://faculty.che.umn.edu/fscn/Ted_Labuza/Coffee/Coffee%20Langmuir.pdfDon't know if this adds to the body of knowledge, but found it an
interesting read.  The paper's date appears to be 2000 from the prof's
homepage athttp://faculty.che.umn.edu/fscn/ted%5Flabuza/.Brent
Roasting in an SC/TO
For drip and moka brew
<Snip>

9) From: John Blumel
On Nov 15, 2004, at 11:13pm, John Blumel wrote:
<Snip>
Something else that's been mentioned is to grind 10-20 minutes before 
brewing, although, since I've never tried this, I'm not sure if it's 
supposed to result in an accelerated rest or simply accelerated 
outgassing.
John Blumel


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