HomeRoast Digest


Topic: a bit about Turbo Wok, oven roasting and biscotti (Re: +Turbo (64 lines)
1) From: Ryuji Suzuki
From: "Tom Bellerue" 
Subject: Re: +Turbo Crazy web page
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 22:11:32 -1000
<Snip>
I think I mentioned it a few times on the list. The term "wok" is used
rather loosely because "wok roating" is an established term, and wok
is short. What I use is a 12" anodized aluminum pan without Teflon
coating. The pan sits on the stove. The Turbo Oven sits atop the pan.
Last time I included this link:http://silvergrain.org/gallery/categories.php?cat_idThe bean in the pan is Yemen Ismaili roasted a couple snaps into
second crack. You'll note the beans look uneven but that's because
it's Yemen. With Central Americans, it's a completely different story
and I spend effort to make the roast uneven (melange). I personally
think even roasting quality is overrated, but that's another story...
The bottom heat is fully controllable, and with full flame, I have
plenty of heat to roast a lot of coffee. The price is that I have to
agitate manually, and the range area becomes messy with chaff. Well, I
can deal with the hand roasting. This method is very good for melange
roasts for those who love complex cup quality...
Yes it's technologically recessive from Turbo Crazy.
By the way, the metal sieve shown inhttp://silvergrain.org/gallery/details.php?image_id19is very useful for oven roasting. Just put green in it in a single
bean layer, and put it in the oven preheated to 400F, and crank up the
oven to 500F. Every 2-3 minutes, open the door, swirl the sieve to
agitate the beans circulary (do this very quick so that oven doesn't
lose hot air, nor the beans lose heat.) and put it back in. With a gas
oven this is a very satisfactory method, and it can also go up to a
full pound. It's also very useful when cooling beans on top of a box
fan (air is drawn downward -- find an ASCII drawing diagram in my old
posts...), and removing the chaffs. Just bring it outside and let the
beans fly in the air (like flipping the omelet on a pan).
That stainless sieve is also very useful when baking biscotti for the
second time (after slicing). It can be found in a Chinese restaurant
supply company, or sometimes in a large Chinese market. I don't know
what it's called, or what it's used for. My best guess is to steam
buns.
By the way, if you make biscotti yourself, freshly roasted white
sesame with vanilla extract makes a delicious one, as well as classic
bitter almond with fennel seed and lemon peel. I tried ground peanut
once but it was rather uninteresting. Any other biscotti idea?
--
Ryuji Suzuki
"I can't believe I'm here.
People always say that I'm a long way from normal."
(Bob Dylan, Normal, Illinois, 13 February 1999)


HomeRoast Digest