HomeRoast Digest


Topic: More Rookie Questions :-) (10 msgs / 258 lines)
1) From: gin
<Snip>
part of this list for a day but this has got to be one of the nicest group
of people I've ever run across on the net.<<<
just wait, we get better and be sure not to piss anyone off...
ginny

2) From: gin
I agree with Brett,
there are tons of ways to roast and each of us finds what works.
ginny
beans have been roasted for a long, long time in very crude ways and have bean geat.

3) From: Adam Stiles
Thanks for all the kind responses to my intro. Gotta say, I've only been a
part of this list for a day but this has got to be one of the nicest group
of people I've ever run across on the net.
If you'll indulge me, I have two more questions.
Is there a next logical roaster that one graduates to after something like
the Poppery? I'm not there yet, but it would be great to be able to roast 10
pounds of gift coffee.
Second question. I didn't notice this at first because the decaf I roasted
first didn't produce much if any chaff (the extra decaf process kills
that?). However, the caffeinated stuff I've roasted, a Guatemalan, a Kenyan
AA, and a Columbian all produce a bunch of chaff, and some is still left in
the beans after roasting is done. Most often I see if in the "crevice" of
the bean - sorry if that's the wrong term. Most of the chaff gets blown off,
but there is still a bunch stuck in crevices. Is there a good way to remove
this? I've tried different quantities in the Poppery, and letting it roast a
long time, but it doesn't seem to help. I don't like the light-brown chaff
flecks in my nice dark brown ground coffee.
Thanks for your help,
Adam
Adam Stiles, Stilesoft Inc.
NetCaptor - Stop Browsing the Old Wayhttp://www.netcaptor.com/
|

4) From: Andy Thomas
--- Adam Stiles  wrote:
<Snip>
IMO the little bit of chaff left in the clefts of the
beans shouldn't matter at all. I ignore it and the
coffee still tastes great.
As for graduating from the popper, it depends on your
needs. I started roasting with poppers 4 years ago and
feel no need to "graduate". If you decide you want to
roast larger amounts, you may want to try one of the
other methods discussed here. Or you may want to play
around with other methods for fun -- but it is not
necessarily graduating. That's my story and I'm
sticking to it.:-)
Andy 
Do you Yahoo!? 
Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail

5) From: Brett Mason
I went to a Stainless steel 12" skillet on a bbq sideburner.  I do a
pound at a time, and use a flat spatula to lift the beans so they wont
scorch.  The coffee is awesome.  I disregard the chaff still in the
bean...  My roasts are now 1.5 lb per shot -and it goes quickly.
I am sour on the scientists on the list who will argue whether my
roasts/methods are good or not - and have all the answers on why...
Listen to em, try what you like, and find a way that works for you...
Then pick the political fights you wish to engage, and have fun...
regards,
Brett
On Wed, 1 Dec 2004 22:32:16 -0800 (PST), Andy Thomas  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

6) From: Scott Jensen
I think to do larger quantities you need to either go to a Wok or a 
drum.  Check out Tom's site on roasters http://www.homeroaster.com/intro1.htmlfor a look at various roasters.">http://www.sweetmarias.com/homemade-homeroasters.htmland check out Ed Needhams sitehttp://www.homeroaster.com/intro1.htmlfor a look at various roasters.
Scott
Adam Stiles wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Dec 1, 2004, at 11:51 PM, Adam Stiles wrote:
Adam, see notes below.
<Snip>
I can roast up to 2.5 pounds at a time in my 20 inch wok.  If you have 
access to BBQ space, you sound like  a good candidate for a RK drum.
<Snip>
Don't worry about any traces of chaff left in the bean crevice.   A hot 
air Poppery gets rid of as much chaff as any roasting method.
     Jim Gundlach

8) From: H Hurd
"I am sour on the scientists on the list who will argue whether my
roasts/methods are good or not"
regards,
Brett
Why don't you do us all a favor and keep it to yourself.
Holly

9) From: DEchelbarg
In a message dated 12/2/2004 12:52:23 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
adam writes:
Thanks for all the kind responses to my intro. Gotta say, I've only been a
part of this list for a day but this has got to be one of the nicest group
of people I've ever run across on the net.
If you'll indulge me, I have two more questions.
Is there a next logical roaster that one graduates to after something like
the Poppery? I'm not there yet, but it would be great to be able to roast 10
pounds of gift coffee.
I'm guessing for nice quantities:  An RK Drum with BB Grill.  That'll would 
be my next step, although with a manual steel popper you can do up to 1 pound.
Second question. I didn't notice this at first because the decaf I roasted
first didn't produce much if any chaff (the extra decaf process kills
that?). However, the caffeinated stuff I've roasted, a Guatemalan, a Kenyan
AA, and a Columbian all produce a bunch of chaff, and some is still left in
the beans after roasting is done. Most often I see if in the "crevice" of
the bean - sorry if that's the wrong term. Most of the chaff gets blown off,
but there is still a bunch stuck in crevices. Is there a good way to remove
this? I've tried different quantities in the Poppery, and letting it roast a
long time, but it doesn't seem to help. I don't like the light-brown chaff
flecks in my nice dark brown ground coffee.
The chaff isn't going to hurt anything or alter taste -- I don't know how you 
cool your beans, I put them on top of the fan, and haven't noticed much 
sticking to them --   Great fun isn't it.
Thanks for your help,
Adam

10) From: Brett Mason
Try some decaf?
On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 08:28:27 -0500, H Hurd  wrote:
<Snip>


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