HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New Member Intro (17 msgs / 347 lines)
1) From: gin
Welcome Bo:
Hope you are one of those Cattle Barons, this is going to get expensive!
ginny

2) From: Bo Maiuri
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Greetings all from Kalispell, Montana!! 
I just wanted to introduce myself - I am totally new to the roasting =
thing, but diving in head first, Including my purchase of a RK Drum =
which should be here the first of next week.
Lots of good info in my first day or two of browsing the list.
Looking forward to it!
Bo Maiuri
Kalispell, MT

3) From: Les
Welcome Bo!  I am a 20 year homeroaster and I use an RK drum too. 
Email me off list if you have a particular question.  Better yet
contact Ron, he gives great customer service!  You live in a beautiful
place!  My daughter worked at Glacier National Park for two years.
Les
Roseburg, OR
On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 23:29:37 -0700, Bo Maiuri  wrote:
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4) From: DEchelbarg
Welcome Bo,
Please share your experiences as you begin roast with your new RK --  
all the best this season,
Dave E

5) From: George Holt
Welcome Bo,
 You are going to love your RK! I've roasted over 150 pounds in mine
and love it. Any question you can E-mail of line.
On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 07:28:57 EST, DEchelbarg  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Living Large In Waxhaw, NC.
George Holt

6) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
here the first of next week.
It is much easier to learn the basics of roasting and profiling with a
popper. Then you can understand what is happening in the drum.
--

7) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Bo,
    Welcome to the list.  and a long road into really enjoying coffee.
          Jim Gundlach
On Dec 23, 2004, at 12:29 AM, Bo Maiuri wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
Bo,
   Welcome to the list.  and a long road into really enjoying coffee.
         Jim Gundlach
On Dec 23, 2004, at 12:29 AM, Bo Maiuri wrote:
ArialGreetings all from
Kalispell, Montana!!
Arial  
ArialI just wanted to introduce
myself - I am totally new to the roasting thing, but diving in head
first, Including my purchase of a RK Drum which should be here the
first of next week.
 
ArialLots of good info in my first
day or two of browsing the list.
 
ArialLooking forward to =
it!
 
ArialBo =
Maiuri
ArialKalispell, =
MT
=

8) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Dec 23, 2004, at 7:48 AM, Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>
Just to reflect a diversity of opinion, I believe the best way to learn 
coffee roasting is to roast in a wok.  You can see, hear, and smell 
more wok roasting than any other way.  Once you learn what happens 
through wok roasting it is easier to identify the stages of roasting 
using methods that limit sight, hearing, and smell.
      Jim Gundlach

9) From: George Holt
I loved learning to roast in the Hot Top. Being able to smell, hear
and see the roast as it progressed made for a real easy learning
curve. That along with all the information I was able to gather from
Tom's site and from the list members. Hope everyone one has a Happy
New Year roasting the New Crop of 2005.
On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 08:07:10 -0600, Pecan Jim Gundlach
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Living Large In Waxhaw, NC.
George Holt

10) From: Jared Andersson
Welcome to the list Bo.  Jared
On Wed, 22 Dec 2004 23:29:37 -0700, Bo Maiuri  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Dennis Parham
Welcome Bo !
Dennis Parham
On Dec 23, 2004, at 9:28 AM, Jared Andersson wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Lowe, David
Welcome to the list Bo, hope you have a great a time as I did learning =
all bout roasting and coffee. This is a great list.
Dave Lowe

13) From: R.N.Kyle
Welcome to the list Bo, I have learned more about coffee here on SM list =
then anywhere else. Good luck with your new drum and motor set up.
RK

14) From: Xerxes Lee
welcme bo,
what is RK drum?
On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 16:06:05 -0500, R.N.Kyle  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
visit my blogger page @http://roasteria.blogspot.com/

15) From: Les
Xerxes,
I know Ron Kyle is too humble to answer this question properly, so I
will.  A RK Drum is the most versatile homeroaster available to the
masses.  You can roast from 4 oz. to 4 pounds of coffee.  It converts
a propane BBQ into a simple and effective roaster.  It is easy to use,
and you can roast with any profile you want once you get some time on
the roaster.  I roast by time and temperature.  You have to vary your
profile by the weight of the load some, but I find it to be a very
forgiving method of roasting.  After 20 years of roasting by many
methods, this is the one I like the best.  I still use my popper.  I
will still use my Heatgun and Dog bowl when needed, and camping isn't
camping without doing some roasting over the fire with Androck.
Les
On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 07:51:26 +0700, Xerxes Lee  wrote:
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16) From: DEchelbarg
Les, thank you for the description, I might be moving in that direction this 
spring.  I live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  Do you think I could be 
doing a roast tonight outside at zero?  Or would I have to be moving into a 
relatively warm 25 degree garage?
I've noticed on my manual popper in the garage, that as I approach the 1st 
crack I need to add a bit more flame to get it over the hump -- when it is cold. 
 As I said in a post last week, I routinely like to do 150 gram roasts to 
keep things fresh for my own use, but occasionally will do one pound roasts and 
often do 300 grams.
Dave E  
In a message dated 12/23/2004 8:32:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
les.albjerg writes:
Xerxes,
I know Ron Kyle is too humble to answer this question properly, so I
will.  A RK Drum is the most versatile homeroaster available to the
masses.  You can roast from 4 oz. to 4 pounds of coffee.  It converts
a propane BBQ into a simple and effective roaster.  It is easy to use,
and you can roast with any profile you want once you get some time on
the roaster.  I roast by time and temperature.  You have to vary your
profile by the weight of the load some, but I find it to be a very
forgiving method of roasting.  After 20 years of roasting by many
methods, this is the one I like the best.  I still use my popper.  I
will still use my Heatgun and Dog bowl when needed, and camping isn't
camping without doing some roasting over the fire with Androck.
Les

17) From: Les
Dave,
The coldest I have been able to muster here in Roseburg has been 27
degrees.  I RKed just to check things out.  I had to increase the heat
by about 1/8th inch on my knobs to compensate for the colder weather. 
I think you could roast in cold weather without a problem.   Cooling
the beans went very fast!  I used to ski Iron Mountain back in the old
days.  I went to the University of N. Dakota for two years (Masters
Degree).  I am glad I don't live in the cold weather anymore.
Les
On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:39:29 EST, DEchelbarg  wrote:
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