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Topic: a long winded, wordy dissertation...... (2 msgs / 123 lines)
1) From: Randy Allen
<Snip>
depending on where you live, most public utility commissions have specifics 
in their charters
that the voltage supplied to customers must fall within 5% of nominal 
voltage...
according to the national electrical code, line loss (voltage drop) for 
inside wiring is limited
to 3% for feeders, and 2% for branch circuits, totalling 5%.
so... between those variables, line loss and utility tolerance, you can 
have up to 10%
under nominal voltage. add that to "nominal" voltages found in the US, 
(110, 115, 117, 120)
and "nominal" voltages requested by appliances, and you can end up in a sucky
situation. try plugging a hottop (120 volts specified) into a service 
delivered in the
midwest at 110, with line loss, and utility tolerance, and you have 99 
volts to work with.
there is a third variable present, as well. if your electric utility is 
regulated or unregulated.
for example, in southern calif. there are both.... for example, LADWP is 
regulated, and
SCE is unregulated. this means that a voltage regulator is installed on 
each 5KV
feeder leaving the distribution station, and monitors the voltage AT THE 
END of that
feeder, making sure it stays at the set voltage. a regulator is about the 
size of a small
refrigerator, makes clicking sounds like a bomb when it works, and sometimes
explodes like one.... utility companies don't like them. they are the most 
dangerous
equipment in a system, and the most problematic. for example, if you are in 
a regulator
room at 7:15 in the morning, all at once, all these things start clicking 
like mad, in
an attempt to deal with all of Los Angeles turning on their blow dryers and 
coffee pots
at the same instant. it's best to leave the room for 20 minutes or so, 
until they settle down,
'cause when they switch is when they blow, often. it's one of the highest 
peak loads
that has to be dealt with.
SCE on the other hand, eliminates all that inconvenience by not using 
regulators in
most of their system. this means your voltage is what it is. tough shit. if 
you don't
like it, work it out in therapy. there isn't much they will do.
usually voltage drop is a problem in the summer, with air conditioning 
loads at peak.
the real problem lies in the summer, when all the air conditioning loads 
kick in.
a motor, unlike a heating element, will not produce less power with lower 
voltage,
it will try and do the same work, by pulling MORE current to make up for 
the lower
voltage. as transformers in the system get buried with load, their voltage 
falls off,
which causes the motors to suck still MORE current. then you have a brownout.
keep it up long enough, and the substation relays out, opens circuit breakers,
and you have a blackout.
you can request a customer survey from your utility company... they put a 
recorder
on your service for a week, and can make adjustments to the pole mounted
transformer serving you to bump it up a click if need be.
so... with all this pointless information you've been provided with, you 
can overcome
the evils of both enron, and the public utilities commission for just 
$100.... what a
value, eh? that little charming variac is looking better and better all the 
time, 'hmm?
as long as i am providing pointless trivia, you can be grateful that you 
don't have to
deal with the OTHER side of the utilities, water and sewage...... those 
poor people
have their worst day approaching quickly..... super bowl sunday. they have to
prepare a couple weeks in advance for it...... and the problem is half 
time.....
consider this..... every toilet in america will be flushed 4 times in 10 
minutes....
it all has to go somewhere.......
consider it a sort of gift.... at least you don't have to deal with the 
mega flush....
merry christmas....
randy

2) From: alfred
depending on where you live, most public utility commissions have specifics
in their charters
that the voltage supplied to customers must fall within 5% of nominal
voltage...
 Yes Randy, you got me to thinking so I called Pacific Power and reported 
the line voltage drop. They were here within the hour and checked  our power 
both at the disconnect and the transformer in the street. At 111.7, he said 
that we are still within their allowable perameters. He also said that, if 
it was any comfort, all of the homes in our cul de sac were getting exactly 
the same. Our house is at the very end of the feed, so I suppose it's the 
heating season and turkey cooking time.
Goodbye problem, hello variac from SM
Thanks again Randy  and the Lord for this blessed day
Merry Christmas


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