HomeRoast Digest


Topic: A couple of roasting questions. (16 msgs / 401 lines)
1) From: Hugh Solaas
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Steve,
 
Welcome to the world of home roasting!  If you pay a little more 
attention, I think you'll like the aroma of roasting coffee as the roast expels 
moisture from the beans, up until the first crack.  Heavenly, like the 
smell of fresh baked coffee bread!  During the first and second cracks, the 
smell becomes more burnt, a smell that some folks (like my wife) find 
objectionable.  Find a way to exhaust the fumes, such as a range hood or 
roasting in your fireplace.  If that fails, stick a plug in your nose for a 
few hours.  The next day, when you're drinking the best coffee you ever 
had, it will be worth it.
 
Again, welcome to the list!
 
Hugh Solaas
 
P.S.  Reroasting coffee is generally not recommended.  For the 
few cents worth of coffee you

2) From: Stephen Starling
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Hi all, I'm Stephen Starling, new to the list and 
to homeroasting.  I just got my Precision today.
 
Roasted 2 batches of Guatemalen Atitlan El 
Quiche.
Started the 1st batch with the Precision set for 
4.75, as Sweetmaria's instructions suggest.  These finished the 1st 
crack.  The roast appears very light.  I'm going to give it a 6 hr 
rest before I try it.  But if I decide I'd like it darker, can I put them 
back in the roaster and roast them a little longer?
 
The second batch I set the roaster for 6, and this 
batch was completing the 2nd crack when it went into cooling.  Smelled a 
bit better too.  Which leads me to my second question.  I kept reading 
about wonderful aromas during roasting?  HuH?  My wife and I agree 
that the smell is unpleasant, but barely tolerable. Any comments?
 
Thank you!

3) From: Jim Slaughter
Steven Starling asked whether he could put underroasted beans in for a bit
more roasting. I think this is pretty much frowned upon by experienced
roasters, though I guess it couldn't hurt to try. It's not likely to yield
tasty coffee though.  The orthodoxy is that any reheating of the beans or
loss of temperature during roasting is a no-no.
Steven also opined that the roasting aroma is "barely tolerable". I think
it's less awful than that.  Me at the end of a hot day when I forgot to
apply deodorant is barely tolerable. Roasting aromas are comparatively
delectable.  The smell of roasting coffee does take some getting used to.
The most interesting part is the range of scents during the roasting
process.  I really enjoy the aroma when the beans are getting to a golden
yellow color. Hard to describe but really wonderful to my nose. Then you get
the smokey, tarry, smells around second crack, which are also quite
interesting.
The smell of roasting coffee has grown on me over time. The part I find to
be "barely tolerable" is the next day after roasting in a closed
environment.  It's sickly sweet to me. I always roast outside now.
Regards,
Jim Slaughter
Slaughter & Slaughter, LLP
js
Phone: 949-721-9091
Fax:   949-721-9844

4) From: Bryce Decker
Sephen,
        With those beans that were roasted lighter than you wanted:  do two
things:  1) brew some of them into coffee, and 2) put the rest back into
the roaster and darken them.  You may or may not like the results of 1),
and I can assure you you will not like the coffee brewed from 2)  It will
have what some called a "baked" flavor (or non-flavor!).   But you will
have learned some basic lessons in homeroasting.
        As for the aroma of roasting coffee, I can't help you there.  Most
folks love it, but a significant number don't like it all.  I expect,
thought, that the results you are going to get ffrom homeroasting will more
than compensate you for the smell of the smoke.
        -Bryce

5) From: cationic
Stephen,
Several list members have reported pretty good success when continuing
interrupted roasts. Certainly worth a try. Your mileage may vary, though.
As for the smell during roasting: it is an acquired taste, no question. It
doesn't smell like roasted coffee from the beginning. My experience has
been that the aroma does not fully develop until I have let the roasted
beans rest for at least overnight. But I have come to appreciate and like
the smells during the roast. Actually, smell is one of the indicators I use
for knowing when the roast is done. And, the grassy smell you get at the
beginning of the process is something I kind of like now.
Regards,
Rafael

6) From: Mike Geis
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7) From: Ken Mary
Re: + A couple of roasting questions.
Welcome Stephen, and please inform us of your progress.
I have made only one roast of the El Quiche so far and it was stopped at the end of first crack. This was not planned but first crack seemed to run too long compared to other beans, so I stopped at a normal total roast time. The brew made the next morning was very good.
I under-roasted some Brazil Cerrado and was unimpressed with the flavor. The next day I reroasted the same beans taking them to the beginning of second crack. I had no idea how long to time them so I used second crack to stop. The flavor was better but there was a slight over-roast taste. So I suggest that you re-roast and manually stop when you hear second crack. You have nothing to lose.
When I first got my Melitta Aromaroast, and was just learning the mechanics of the process, I set the air control at low (for high temperature) to speed up the very slow roast time. Of course I did this in the kitchen. I was using the 15 year old beans that came with the roaster, so I did not care if I messed up. The beans just sat there without moving around and soon there was the roasting smoke that everyone mentioned so I said so what. I dumped the roast soon after the smoke appeared, and cleaned up. Later as I walked through the house, there was a blue-grey smoke in every room, along with a burnt coffee smell. The smoke soon cleared, but the odor lingered for 3 days. It was very unpleasant and gave me a headache. It was similar to the events of maybe 10 years ago when there were brush fires during a dry Spring which burned for days. The offensive smell was inescapable for almost a week.
That lesson taught me to make sure that the beans are always moving around and mixing up. I have never had any smoke or odor problem since, and I continue to roast in the kitchen.
-- 
Ken Mary - Aromaroast - whirlyblade - French Press
----------
From: "Stephen Starling" <starling>
To: <homeroast>
Subject: + A couple of roasting questions.
Date: Wed, Apr 19, 2000, 5:13 PM
Hi all, I'm Stephen Starling, new to the list and to homeroasting.  I just got my Precision today.
 
Roasted 2 batches of Guatemalen Atitlan El Quiche.
Started the 1st batch with the Precision set for 4.75, as Sweetmaria's instructions suggest.  These finished the 1st crack.  The roast appears very light.  I'm going to give it a 6 hr rest before I try it.  But if I decide I'd like it darker, can I put them back in the roaster and roast them a little longer?
 
The second batch I set the roaster for 6, and this batch was completing the 2nd crack when it went into cooling.  Smelled a bit better too.  Which leads me to my second question.  I kept reading about wonderful aromas during roasting?  HuH?  My wife and I agree that the smell is unpleasant, but barely tolerable. Any comments?
 
Thank you!

8) From: Stephen Starling
Okay, Thanks to all for such a quick response!
Here's what I've decided to do.  Unless and until I acquire a liking for the
aroma, I'm going to do my roasting in the basement laundry room.  It's a
small room with a door and an exhaust fan.  That ought to do the trick!  Oh,
and I know that I shouldn't store coffee in there, wouldn't want those
various chemicals in there to penetrate my precious coffee!
(Oh, and I checked, as far as I can tell, I AM using plain text, not html,
uh, i think.)

9) From: Eric Bear Albrecht
 
Stephen Starling wrote about some supposedly underroasted Guatemalan,
and I figure that as long as it went past first crack, it's fine.
Some coffees need more, but not that one.
;B
-- 
      Eric Bear Albrecht     ebear    http://www.newmex.com/ebear      Tired of the same old crap?  Note that crap, gore, and bush are all
      four-letter words.  Want to see anything change?  Vote for Nader.
      Anything else is just more insanity.  Two-party system?  HA!!

10) From: Prabhakar Ragde
<Snip>
In trying to describe the smell to friends, I liken it to a wood fire
in which someone is burning something unusual and slightly
disturbing. It's an interesting smell, but not one you want hanging
around the house for a long time. Nonroasters always think that
roasting coffee must smell like the finished stuff does after twelve
hours or so, and that's not true at all. Note that in an earlier
thread, many posters claimed that after late-night roasting sessions,
they were unable to sleep, possibly because of what they inhaled in
the smoke. --PR

11) From: Robert Norton
You are now but you and Ken both had HTML attachments to your previous
posts.
********************************************
Stephen Starling wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Christopher Doyle
Stephen,
A while ago there was a discussion on this list regarding reroasting
stale coffee beans and revitalizing them to a certain extent.  I have
taken underroasted bland tasting beans that were brought to me as a gift
from Colombia and reroasted them to get a much better flavor.  No baked
flavors were present either.  Thus, if the roast of your Guatemalan is
really too light for your taste, it shouldn't hurt too much to reroast
them a bit.  Let us know how it turns out if you do!  
Kuyler Doyle
On Thu, 20 Apr 2000, cationic wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Angelo
In the days when I was not much of a coffee drinker( I still only have two
cups a day), I would drive out of my way to avoid the "aromas" emanating
from a coffee roaster in Bklyn... It was sickening..
I find that the smell of my own roasting, however, to be much more
enjoyable. I especially like the smell in the house which greets me after
I've  stepped  out for a while. Sorta like that smell you get in a country
house that has a fireplace....
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

14) From: Mick
 
Thats exactly how I would describe it, in fact friends that come over to my 
house a few hours after I have roasted always comment about how good it smells.
Mick
At 12:28 PM 4/20/00 -0400, you wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Mandy Willison
<Snip>
<Snip>
though.
<Snip>
I did this for the first time and was greatly surpised of the improvement-
bean'wild!

16) From: Mandy Willison
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    Mike re "My wife and I agree that the smell is unpleasant, but barely 
    tolerable. Any comments?"
     
    The Rancilio bloke who sold me the S24 pops round from time to time to 
    see what I am up to. He often gets visably transported back to his past 
    living in PNG when he smells this smoke. He becomes reminiscent and I 
    suspect, remembers why he services and sells machines and is involved with 
    coffee in the first place. IOW, smells can jolt you into remembering  
    why are where you are at.
    -bean'blissed!
     


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