HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New to home roasting and this list- Vacuuming Brewing Question (9 msgs / 301 lines)
1) From: Ross, Jimme
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I took the plunge and got an i-Roast and some green beans from SweetMaria's
and have now become fully imersed into what I have jokingly referred to as
"the dark side" of Coffee. This morning's cup of Kenya AA Lot 220 was
absolute heaven. And it was brewed in an old (but clean) cheap auto-drip
coffee maker. (Tonight it will be brewed with a French Press. Can't wait!)
 
On weekends when I have more time I prefer to use the Bodum Santos Vacuum
Coffee maker. I am doing this on the stovetop for now and folling Tom's
advice and the instructions, I pre heat water to 200+ degrees in a pan and
then pour it into the glass jug. Then I place the glass funnel on top and
place on the heat. After the water has set in the funnel for 30 sec to 1 min
I remove from the heat and place on room temp countertop. So far, typically
only 4 - 6 ounces pass through and according to the directions I place the
semi-brewed pot back on the heat repeating the process. So far the results
have been good but:
 
I've been "trained" to NEVER re heat brewed Coffee or re filter water
through the grinds and the Bodum instructions are contrary to these beliefs.
Although I've been drinking "decent" coffee for two decades, I probably
picked up wrong info here and there and am wondering if I've been mislead by
some of these "folk tales" or are they factual.
 
Is it normal to need to reheat to get the vacuum to brew or might I be
missing something?
 
Jimme Quinn Ross
Upstate NY
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I took the plunge 
and got an i-Roast and some green beans from SweetMaria's and have now become 
fully imersed into what I have jokingly referred to as "the dark side" of 
Coffee. This morning's cup of Kenya AA Lot 220 was absolute heaven. And it was 
brewed in an old (but clean) cheap auto-drip coffee maker. (Tonight it will be 
brewed with a French Press. Can't wait!)
 
On weekends when I 
have more time I prefer to use the Bodum Santos Vacuum Coffee maker. I am doing 
this on the stovetop for now and folling Tom's advice and the instructions, I 
pre heat water to 200+ degrees in a pan and then pour it into the glass jug. 
Then I place the glass funnel on top and place on the heat. After the water has 
set in the funnel for 30 sec to 1 min I remove from the heat and place on room 
temp countertop. So far, typically only 4 - 6 ounces pass through and according 
to the directions I place the semi-brewed pot back on the heat repeating the 
process. So far the results have been good but:
 
I've been "trained" 
to NEVER re heat brewed Coffee or re filter water through the grinds and the 
Bodum instructions are contrary to these beliefs. Although I've been drinking 
"decent" coffee for two decades, I probably picked up wrong info here and there 
and am wondering if I've been mislead by some of these "folk tales" or are they 
factual.
 
Is it normal to need 
to reheat to get the vacuum to brew or might I be missing 
something?
 
Jimme 
Quinn Ross
Upstate 
NY

2) From: Andy Thomas
Jimme, you shouldn't have to reheat to get a vac
brewer to work. It sounds as though your grind has too
much dust and is clogging the filter, causing a stall.
Try grinding coarser and see if that helps. Those who
are familiar with the Santos should weigh in soon with
more specific advice.
Welcome to the List.
Andy
--- "Ross, Jimme"  wrote:
[snip]
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3) From: John Blumel
On Jan 6, 2005, at 3:25pm, Ross, Jimme wrote:
<Snip>
The instructions to put the Bodum Santos back on the heat only apply 
for those times when it "stalls" -- i.e., when the brewed coffee does 
not fully return to the bottom pot but becomes stuck in the funnel. 
When this happens, you aren't going to get a very good cup of coffee 
anyway since it will become overextracted. Returning the vac pot to the 
heat will make the coffee worse but, theoretically, it may break up the 
grounds that are causing the stall and allow all of the coffee to drain 
from the funnel to the bowl. Personally, if you have to do this, I'd 
throw the coffee out.
Stalls are more common with an uneven grind and/or a grind that 
contains a lot of dust. However, one way to avoid this problem -- in 
addition to buying a better grinder, if you can afford it -- is to use 
a cloth filter made for a Yama or Hario vac pot since these are much 
less likely to stall. The Hario filter is a little better for use with 
the Santos because the Hario filter tube is closer in length to the 
Bodum.
John Blumel

4) From: Sharon Allsup
Hi Jimme,
Welcome to Home-Roasting!  (muahahahahahahaaaa)
<Snip>
No, it's not normal to have to do that over and over again.  I'll
second what the others said about possibly your grind is too fine, or
perhaps too uneven so there are fine bits blocking the little plastic
filter-pushup thingy.
We've got a Santos and are quite happy with it.  We also don't follow
the instructions you have read ;)  We put straight-out-of-the-filter,
not-preheated water in the bottom, assemble & plug in the top, measure
coffee into the top chamber, and turn on the heat (gas stove).  Once
the water has boiled up to the top ("goes north" in list parlance)
there will be a small layer of water still in the bottom, burbling
away - we leave it boiling like that for another 30 seconds, then turn
off the heat.  Then the stuff blurbles down to the bottom again, aka
"goes south".  I've noticed sometimes there is a definitely SPLURP!!
type noise and it all rushes down, sometimes it just trickles down. 
The all-at-once rush is more desireable because it's faster.
But what I was getting at is that you shouldn't have stalled roasts on
a regular basis, that would indicate something is wrong.  Reheating to
a boil works for unstalling, for when the stuff doesn't want to go
back down south, but you'll end up with overextracted
less-than-stellar coffee.  Try a slightly coarser grind and see if
that helps any.
Sharon

5) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Three  biggest causes of stalling are incorrect grind, too much chaff =
and beans too oily. If problems persist replace filter with a Hario =
filter.http://www.hariousa.com/hario/parts.html

6) From: John Blumel
On Jan 6, 2005, at 4:13pm, John Blumel wrote:
<Snip>
Or, when the grind is even but too fine. I use a "medium" grind, 
somewhat finer than typical pre-ground coffee but not nearly as fine as 
espresso. But if you think it's too fine, back off a bit until it 
works. Later, you can always try going a little finer until you find 
the finest grind that works for you.
You don't mention what type of grinder you are using but, if it's a 
blade grinder, you may find it difficult to get a grind that will work 
well in the Santos. Inexpensive burr grinders can also be problematic 
with the Santos, depending on the grinder and how much dust it 
produces.
John Blumel

7) From: Brett Mason
You can spend thousands on a commercial grinder.
Or hundreds on a very good electric conical burr grinder.
Or a reasonable amount on a Zassenhaus Manual Coffee Mill.
  ...and grinding? ...it's the key to good coffee, including vacuum!
Please See Tom at the checkstand and he'll get you all squared away!
 http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.zas.shtmlWelcome,
Brett
On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 11:31:35 -1000, Barry Luterman
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

8) From: John Blumel
On Jan 6, 2005, at 4:39pm, Edward Spiegel wrote:
<Snip>
The glass rod certainly seems to stall less than the Santos filter, 
although, I'm not sure that all glass rods work equally well with all 
brewers. However, the cloth filters, if kept properly cleaned, are 
virtually unstallable with anything resembling a decent and proper 
grind -- i.e., reasonably even without too much dust and somewhere near 
optimal fineness.
John Blumel

9) From: Brett Mason
Vacuum brewing requires three keys for success:
  Proper heat - Water must become vaporized in order to force the rest
of the water into the upper bowl.  The genius of the vacuum brew
system is its abilo maintain the upper bowl liquid at 205 degrees
until heat is removed from the lower bowl.
  Proper seal - as water becomes steam, the lower bowl must remain
sealed so that heated water goes up the tube to the upper bowl; 
Likewise, the seal must be effective to ensure the vacuum in the lower
bowl pulls the liquid past the filter into the lower bowl.  Many Cory
owners are familiar with old rubber seals that don't retain the
vacuum.
  Proper Grind - too fine and you will stall your filter.  Too coarse
and your coffee will be underextracted.  Did I say get a Zass?
Regards,
Brett
On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 16:51:45 -0500, John Blumel  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!


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