HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Newbie and beans (37 msgs / 872 lines)
1) From: gin
John,
Welcome and you have come to the right place for an answer.
Buy lots of what you like since it will not be around forever and buy stuff you have not tried.
100 pounds, so what?
ginny

2) From: john kahla
Hi guys,
Am just getting started with home roasting and have a question about
buying green beans. Every time now that I taste something I find I
like, I have this urge to buy 5# of it. Well this can only last so
long before I have 100# of beans. What is the best way to get started,
buy 1# of what you like and another # of something you haven't tried
or stock up on the ones you like thinking that the next crop won't
taste the same and try an occasional new one? The most I make is 1 pot
a day.
Thanks, John

3) From: Brett Mason
This is one way...
Sweet Marias has a 4-pack and an 8-pack sampler.  Try the 8 pack, and
keep a log of what you like, how you roasted it, what you noticed
etc...  This $20 will be a good value to you...
After a while, you may start getting bigger bags of beans.  I have one
bean I buy a lot of, as a staple.  Then I get 2-5# bags every so often
to try something new...
Keep the log, it will help you!
Brett
On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 14:15:41 -0800, john kahla  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

4) From: Tom Ulmer
Figure a # of days/pound consumption ratio and apply it to what you =
consider
a prudent supply. Now factor in your desire for variety and buy =
accordingly
making sure to rummage through the coffee pantry trying to adhere to a =
FIFO
(first in first out) inventory consumption method. 
In other words, if your ratio is 5days/pound, and a prudent supply is =
one
year, your inventory level would be 73 pounds. If you bought a single =
pound
of each variety you could have something different every day for 2 =
months.
cheers

5) From: John Blumel
On Jan 14, 2005, at 6:15pm, Tom Ulmer wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
Or, if you end up with 200 pounds, you can always use this formula to 
back in to a number for what a prudent supply is and use that to defend =
the size of your stash.
John Blumel

6) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
John,
     Buy five pounds of the things you like twenty pounds of the things 
you really like until external sources of control stop you.
          Jim
On Jan 14, 2005, at 4:15 PM, john kahla wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: petzul
I agree. Seems like you  just get to learn how you like it roasted with 
only 5#.
Then you have to roast ahead a bit so you can see how you like it after 
3 days, 4 days, 5 days.
Then you wish you had a whole bunch of that 3.5 day stuff.
Nahhh.. you just can't have too much of something you like.
PeterZ
Thinking none of it will go to waste anyway, here in LHC.
Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Gary Townsend
Buy 10 #'s of every bean variety that you can get your hands on, do
this before your spouse catches on....if you don't like a particular
bean, there are 100's of us out here to trade beans with. You are one
of us, now...
On a side note...2 #'s of 5 varieties is a good way to start, after
getting the sampler from SM's. Then you'll have enough of the beans to
take the roast levels from City thru Vienna roasts, and you may like a
particular variety at a certain roast level, and hate it at another.
I've yet to get any truly obnoxious bean that i could not manipulate
into drinkable coffee. I'm currently down to 90 pounds, from a high of
160... And I'm already plotting to double or triple my stash, this
year. Shhh, I think my wife's coming...hide the beans!
Gary

9) From: john kahla
Thanks guys....just had to let you know this has now become an
addiction in two weeks. Maria just put up a garage sale of items and
now own an I-Roast !!!! So guess a 100#  limit just doesn't make
sense. Does everyone lose all control when doing homeroasting.
Thanks

10) From: Les
Another dude on the slippery slope!
Les
On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 16:52:48 -0800, john kahla  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Les
Buy the variety packs and see which region you like the best.  Then
explore that region with one pounders.  READ Tom's reviews.  What do
you like in coffee as you read the cupping profiles use them to pick
other coffees to try.   At 1 Pot a day, you are not going to go
through that much coffee.  I would buy a 5 pounder of what you
consider outstanding.  Once you settle in on a favorite, buy a 20
pounder and use others as varieties for change.  If you move to
espresso, you will find you will go through coffee much faster.
Les
On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 14:15:41 -0800, john kahla  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Andy Thomas
--- john kahla  wrote:
<Snip>
Pretty much. Yeah.
;-) Andy
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

13) From: Art M
It's our personalities that do us in.  Homeroasting is in fact my third
obsessive hobby.  First there was bike racing.  You would be surprised how
many $4-5000 bikes you can convince yourself you NEED when you finagle
discounts with local bike shops.  I still bike race, I no longer collect
bikes though.  I got down to 5 and thought I was cured.  Then, and I thought
bikes were bad, then came audio/video equipment.  That hobby puts bikes to
shame.  When your hobby of choice includes things that can cost the price of
a nice car and still get reviews like "pretty good" and "good for the
money", you need medical attention.  So I got that one out of my system
after damn near taking out a second mortgage.  Luckily the stuff lasts for a
very long time.  Now, as I sat around bereft of a money pit hobby, coming
back from a long hard bike ride and relaxing to some jazz on my audio
system, what comes to mind is a nice cup of coffee (ice coffee after summer
rides).  So after a decent espresso machine, then a better one, then a good
grinder, then a better one, now I am homeroasting.  It never ends!!!  But, I
have come to the sober conclusion it isn't my fault, its just my genetics.
It's simple cause and effect.
It's OK John.  Just accept who you are.  All of us have.  ;-)

14) From: Angelo
Hmmmm....why would anyone spend a lot of money on audio equipment to listen 
to jazz???
A.
<Snip>

15) From: Michael Douglas-Llyr
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 00:11:42 -0500, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>
en
<Snip>
Now, now. Don't be rude.
-- 
The Crystal Wind is the storm, and the storm is data, and the data is life.
                                                  Daniel Keyes Moran =

The Long Run

16) From: Edward Spiegel
At 12:11 AM -0500 1/15/05, Angelo wrote:
<Snip>
Are you serious? How about this for a reason: some of the greatest recordings of twentieth century music are jazz recordings and they sound glorious on a true high fidelity system.
If you were kidding, my apologies.
:)
Edward

17) From: Art M
I was going to say because one has good taste, but the below works too. ;-)

18) From: Brett Mason
... Because life is too short for the wretched noise which passes for
music today....
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 00:11:42 -0500, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: H Hurd
<Snip>
to jazz???
A.
Ella
Holly
jazzed on Bugisu this am

20) From: Tom Ulmer
Sipping the morning brew, having a listen to a tune off 10,000 Hz Legend...
thinking it's so good to be modern...
admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2005 9:58 AM
... Because life is too short for the wretched noise which passes for
music today....
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 00:11:42 -0500, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>
listen
<Snip>

21) From: AlChemist John
I guess the same reason some people would actually roast and drink 
Guatemala coffee :-)
I personally can't stand either.
Sometime around 21:11 1/14/2005, Angelo typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

22) From: AlChemist John
I guess the same reason some people would actually roast and drink 
Guatemala coffee :-)
I personally can't stand either.
Sometime around 21:11 1/14/2005, Angelo typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

23) From: Angelo
Oops! I forgot my smiley...or (i!). But, seriously, I don't think one needs 
thousands of dollars worth of equipment to enjoy listening to jazz (or 
roasting/brewing coffee). Classical music is another thing. I imagine the 
dynamic range of a symphony orchestra is much greater than a sax, trumpet 
and rhythm section...or even a big band.
I've listened to jazz on super high fidelity set-ups and  I wasn't that 
impressed with the "realism" vs. cost. I guess it's all about what you're 
used to. I'm a fan of the Rudy Van Gelder Blue Note recordings of the "50's 
and "60's. Most of the stuff I hear today doesn't come up to what he got 
from the music.
Remember, one of the greatest bop concerts was the Massey Hall concert 
recording of Bird, Diz, Bud, Mingus and Roach, and on it Bird played a 
plastic sax. I'm wondering how much more I would enjoy that recording if I 
were sitting in front of a $20, 000 set-up. I'd probably spend  the money 
to get out and hear the music live in a club, even with it's (usually) 
horrible sound system. :-)
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

24) From: Gregg Talton
Isn't diversity fun...
Drinking Guatamalen while listening to Click and Clack and checking email.
Gregg
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 07:50:16 -0800, AlChemist John  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
I was going to warn you against making jokes about jazz, Angelo...dangerous 
business.  I think they use their sense of humor up in other applications 
and don't have much left over for their musical tastes.
Gene Smith
happily waiting to be proved right by a storm of invective, in Houston

26) From: Angelo
Gene,
I wasn't really making fun of jazz...I've been playing the stuff since the 
"50's and have enjoyed most of the masters (IN PERSON). My observation is 
that there is not much of a correlation between audiophiles who have the 
best equipment and the music they listen to.
I have musician friends (jazz, and otherwise) who listen to music on 
turntables (remember those... before DJ's got their hands on them) where 
the needle hasn't been changed in 20 yrs, and I have audiophile friends who 
brag about how much they spent on equipment that captures the "true"sound 
of a steam locomotive roaring across their living room wall....Different 
strokes, etc ....
I do understand the quest for excellence, but I wonder how much one's 
equipment has to do with it... It's the same with coffee equipment.
Ciao,
Angelo
<Snip>

27) From: Michael Osten
On Jan 14, 2005, at 8:04 PM, Art M wrote:
<Snip>
Add computers and electronic gadgets to that list of obsessive 
collecting and you are my long lost twin.
--
Michael Ostenhttp://www.bleepyou.com/~mosten/pgp.txt

28) From: Gracie
My husband and I just now became addicted to the "homeroasting" thing. Began with the Popcorn II popper and now searching out new adventures.  We luuuuuuuv the taste of homeroasted/ground/freshperked java.  Looking for green Costa Rican Peaberry. My favorite.
AlChemist John  wrote:I guess the same reason some people would actually roast and drink Guatemala coffee :-)
I personally can't stand either.
Sometime around 21:11 1/14/2005, Angelo typed:
Hmmmm....why would anyone spend a lot of money on audio equipment to listen to jazz???
A.
It's our personalities that do us in.  Homeroasting is in fact my third
obsessive hobby.  First there was bike racing.  You would be surprised how
many $4-5000 bikes you can convince yourself you NEED when you finagle
discounts with local bike shops.  I still bike race, I no longer collect
bikes though.  I got down to 5 and thought I was cured.  Then, and I thought
bikes were bad, then came audio/video equipment.  That hobby puts bikes to
shame.  When your hobby of choice includes things that can cost the price of
a nice car and still get reviews like "pretty good" and "good for the
money", you need medical attention.  So I got that one out of my system
after damn near taking out a second mortgage.  Luckily the stuff lasts for a
very long time.  Now, as I sat around bereft of a money pit hobby, coming
back from a long hard bike ride and relaxing to some jazz on my audio
system, what comes to mind is a nice cup of coffee (ice coffee after summer
rides).  So after a decent espresso machine, then a better one, then a good
grinder, then a better one, now I am homeroasting.  It never ends!!!  But, I
have come to the sober conclusion it isn't my fault, its just my genetics.
It's simple cause and effect.
It's OK John.  Just accept who you are.  All of us have.  ;-)

29) From:
I'd like to respond to this thread, but I'm too busy drinking a cafe crema 
of Ethiopian Organic Sidamo that I just pulled from my $549 SM5K (the beens 
having been roasted in my $179 I-roast,) while I'm transferring 4941 mp3 
files - (90% jazz & 10% comedy) from my $2300 computer to my $400 Creative 
Labs 60 gigabyte Zen Xtra mp3 player where I will hook up my &160 Sennheiser 
noise cancelling head phones to block out the noise from the city bus when I 
ride to my $12/hr job - - - unless I make the trip in my 1990 Honda Civic. 
Get the picture?  ;> )
Ken "should I buy another saxophone tomorrow" Robinson

30) From: Art M
The whole point of the expensive stuff, is to make you think you ARE
listening to it live!

31) From: Art M
Clearly your priorities are in the right place!

32) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
If they are anything like guitars, then that's a silly question, Ken.
Gene Smith
who never regretted buying one, and always regretted selling one, in 
Houston

33) From: Les
Hey Ken,
The first rule of being a CSA member is to do your own thing!  If you
want to spend your bucks on music stuff that is cool!  Your tunes and
drinking homeroast is your pleasure.  Thanks for sharing them will us.
 I like good Jazz too!  I also enjoy some good Country Western,
Classical, and Blues.   There are folks on this list that have spent
over $100.00 on a Thor Tamper when one of my $30.00 ones would do the
same job.  Now, the $100+ tampers are out of a rare wood and look
really awesome, but they don't really work any better.  Don't let the
guys and gals ribbing get to you, it is all in fun and we love to poke
fun at each other.  Too bad you have a SM5K, I can't tempt you to
consider a $150.00 Ancient Kauri tamper. :>))))  However, if you are a
vinyl audiophile, you might want to check out my "record" tamper. http://www.thortamper.com/pagefour.html(about half way down the
page.)  Welcome to the group.  Let the jabs role off as they are just
in fun.
Les
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 14:16:08 -0800, sippin
 wrote:
<Snip>

34) From: AlChemist John
It is wonderful !  I think Click and Clack are great.
Sometime around 08:23 1/15/2005, Gregg Talton typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

35) From: Mark Tosiello
Well understood, Art.  Homeroasting is one of a Myriad of obsessive 
hobbies that I have gotten myself into...
I HAD to learn to fly.  Fine....then, I HAD to become a Flight 
Instructor.......fine.  Ok, so then I HAD to buy a Plane.  Fine.....ok, 
then I HAD to get into the Martial Arts (Taekwondo).   Ok, well, why not 
work for several years and attain Black Belt......fine....Oh, did I say 
Black Belt?  How 'bout 2nd Degree Black Belt.....fine.   What, you said 
you wanted to work some more to become a certified instructor?  ...... 
OK, fine.....
So, you have decided that you love drawing portraits after many years of 
landscapes?  Fine.......PASTEL portraits ( you artists know what that 
mean$)..fffffff..fffff....fffffffine.....er.....
...wow, you can ROAST YOUR OWN BEANS at home?  Cool!!!   Wow, and do I 
love espresso...maybe I'll get a machine........what, those $100 
machines won't do what I want?   A Tea?  What's that?   Seems like it 
should make COFFEE....oh....it's a machine...is it good?  I should get 
it?   Ok, can I use my blade grinder?   What do you mean, Mini, that 
Mazzer thing is HUGE???
Don't make me start on the new computer I just built.   Let's just say 
water cooling is interesting.............
Mark "it's definitely in the genes" T

36) From: Art M
:-)

37) From: John Blumel
On Jan 15, 2005, at 11:23am, Gregg Talton wrote:
<Snip>
Has anyone noticed that we seem to have mostly Kathys with a K on the 
list?
John Blumel


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