HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 172 gr. in my Pumper (now up to 184 gr) (8 msgs / 144 lines)
1) From: Edward Spiegel
At 4:43 PM -0600 1/14/05, Bob Baker wrote:
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My Wearever Pumper all have slots inside the chamber which is where the air gets in. These are what I widened (with the blade with the blade of a screwdriver without taking the popper apart).
I just did a 184 gram roast of Kenya WP decaf that was about 9 minutes to the 2nd crack outliers. I couldn't tilt much at all because of the risk of beans shooting out of the popper.
Best,
Edward

2) From: Bob Baker
Ed,
Did you widen all or just some of them?
Thanks,
Bob
Edward Spiegel  wrote:
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3) From: Edward Spiegel
At 5:04 PM -0600 1/14/05, Bob Baker wrote:
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I widened them all a little bit. The difference has been awfully dramatic (more than doubling the effective capacity).
--E

4) From: Gary Townsend
Funny thing, I grafted the aluminum roasting chamber from a poppery 2
to a 1440 watt 'screened' presto lite. You know the kind they warn you
about??? And wow, because the heating element and fan assembly are
supported by a 3 legged plastic 'stand', the whole rig will operate
without a shield or an outer plastic 'shell'. I ran it for over an
hour, straight, last nite, while I roasted. ( It makes a nice
additional heater in a cold shop.) The volume of air and heat
available is really awesome. Next step is to add toggle switches and
mount it back into a better housing. I want to be able to run a
dampening system, much like a butterfly on a carburated (remember
those?) engine, to control airflow. I'm just experimenting with what's
available out there, but I found 4 more of those prestolites today in
3 thrift storees, along with another poppery 2. So far it's worked
well, without melting, sparking or shorting out, so that's a good
sign...
I am thinking about opening up the metal vents in another roasting
chamber and comparing the differences, I was thinking of ways to
measure the airflow, any ideas on that, Ed?
( still not ready to hack into one of my 3 poppery (originals) as I
feel that it's somehow wrong...I don't feel that way about any of the
other machines out there, I've got 4 or 5 of them torn apart on my
work bench, awaiting surgery.
On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 15:32:55 -0800, Edward Spiegel
 wrote:
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5) From: Justin Marquez
I routinely roast with the screen-in-the bottom popper at the plant. 
I have only seen the sparking chaff once or twice in a month and it
went out before exiting the popper hood.  The only mods I have made
thus far are to drop two 1/2" ceramic balls into teh chamber to help
agitate the beans.  A 1/2 Cup volume roast takes about 3 to 3:15 to go
to starting second crack.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.comOn Fri, 14 Jan 2005 18:17:05 -0600, Gary Townsend  wrote:
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6) From: Brett Mason
Justin - are those marbles as we grew up with?
Brett
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 08:05:09 -0600, Justin Marquez  wrote:
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-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

7) From: Gary Townsend
Justin, I know a few other people that run with scissors! I'm just
exploring ways to increase the output of normal machines that are
easier to locate, namely poppery 2 types and prestolites...they are
everywhere, and cheap, usually $2 -3. at thrift stores. The poppery 2
style aluminum swirl chamber is the right design. The 1440 watt
heating element and the fan assembly in the prestolite gives you the
extra power. A few tweaks, and you have a possible 6 to 8 oz air
roaster! So, that's my approach. I also like extending the air
roasters chambers, preferably with glass hrricans chimneys, so that
you can monitor the roasting from the side view. Nothing harder than
smoke and heat blasting into your face while you are trying to get a
peek at the roast level ;-O
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 08:05:09 -0600, Justin Marquez  wrote:
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8) From: Justin Marquez
No - They are 1/2" Norton DenStone Catalyst Support media.  They are
mostly round alumina balls, designed to survive temperatures upwards
of  1000 Deg F in a temperature cycling service.  We use them at the
gas plant where I work as a bed support for our gas dehydration tower
beds (filled with silica gel)
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.comOn Sat, 15 Jan 2005 06:59:50 -0800, Brett Mason  wrote:
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