HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New Roaster from Barcelona (3 msgs / 75 lines)
1) From: Mike Geis
My wife and I just returned from Spain, where in Barcelona I bought a 19th
century roaster for 18,000 (= $85,60) at a flea market.  I will put up some
pics when I recover from jet lag but to give you an idea of it, it has a
fire chamber rather like that ofhttp://www.oldcoffeeroasters.com/Spartivento.htm(but with the opening at">http://www.oldcoffeeroasters.com/pierce.htmbut with a round, rather than fancy, coffee chamber rather like that ofhttp://www.oldcoffeeroasters.com/Spartivento.htm(but with the opening at
the end away from the handle).  The base has heart-shaped openings at the
bottom of the sides for air flow.
I plan to try using charcoal briquettes as a heat source and use it.  Has
anyone tried doing this sort of thing?
Mike
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2) From: Kathleen Tinkel
 
I own a roaster of that type, called the American Home Coffee 
Roaster, bought in 1980 or so from Coffee Connoisseurs of Caryville, 
Tenn., obviously a spiritual precursor to Sweet Maria's. It is 
attractive in a form-follows-function sort of way, but much less 
beautiful than any I saw at the oldcoffeeroasters Web site.
It uses a hollow sphere with a handle on one end for twirling and an 
opening on the other (with a cap that could be opened with a supplied 
wrench). The ball rests on a footed cylinder that acts as a chimney 
for the heat source as well as support.
Its design was based on an Italian stovetop roaster with a copper 
bowl used in the late 19th/early 20th century.
Although I used this over a gas burner on top of a kitchen stove, but 
the manual says it "may be used indoors over gas, electric, or 
alcohol heat or outdoors over charcoal or wood fire."
I'll clean mine up and take a picture, and upload it somewhere so you 
can see it if you're interested.
Kathleen
<Snip>
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3) From: Mike Geis
I tried roasting in my 19th century Spanish roaster today and got wonderful
results.  I roasted over charcoal briquettes, discovering that you really
need to let them all get completely white before roasting so as to
distinguish smoke from the briquettes and smoke from the beans.  The
beautiful thing is that one can see the smoke coming out, smell it
(sometimes too much), open the door with ease to check color, and can hear
the cracks.  More than which one cannot ask for quality control.  I was able
to do a half pound and could probably do more.  I will take pictures this
weekend and put them up for viewing.  I think this would work even in
winter.  This beats the devil out of the electrical roasters.  I am going to
take the thing to a local welding company and see what they would charge to
copy it.
Mike Geis


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