HomeRoast Digest


Topic: caffe rosto (80 msgs / 2215 lines)
1) From: HALAWANI, MAHMOUD H
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
caffe rosto

Hi     

I am interested in perchesing a   caffe rosto   is it good    plz any advice. ...thanks


2) From: Jeff Barker
 
I purchased one at the Miami show about a month ago.  So far so good.  BEans 
roast very consistant and I control the roast and cool down very easily.  I 
looked at the Prescision Roaster at the show and wasn't that impressed with 
the quality.  Also, the manufacture's rep kept telling me about the "new and 
improved soon to be released" model so I was getting a little lerious.
One thing for sure, do not use a full 8 oz cup of beans when roasting ( they 
include an 8 oz metal cup) use about 5-6 oz or 3/4 cup.
-jeff barker
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3) From: Renaud Dreyer
<Snip>
Hmmmm... That's interesting, from looking at their website, I got the 
impression that it was possible to roast 8 oz "under certain 
circumstances". What are these circumstances exactly? They also write
that adding more beans lengthens the roast, which would be perfect for 
me as I like full-bodied roasts, for espresso.
So is the Rosto an "Alp killer"? Thanks,
                Renaud
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4) From: Jeff Barker
 
Yes, it is true that you can roast 8 oz - however, I feel I get a more of a 
consistant roast with 5 -6 oz.
There is one problem I have found with the Caffe Rosto.  There is an opening 
below the lid that is used to "catch" the coffee chafe which works fairly 
well.  But with lighter, smaller beans like some Yemen Mocha I just 
purchased from our notorious vendor, the beans get blown into the chafe 
catch and therefore obstructs the airflow.  This only happens once in awhile 
depending upon the amount (5 6 oz) of beans I use.
Just a heads up.
-jeff barker
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5) From: coffenut
Renaud,
It's always good to see competition and this one certainly moves up the
capacity (a notch) in fluid bed roasting.  I guess we'll have to see what
kind of "roaster killer" it is when we see how well it works.  In my
opinion, for the product to be an Alp killer, it would also have to be
capable of producing the longer/mellower roast flavors the Alp can achieve.
I also saw the 8oz claim in their marketing, but the proof will be in what
users say it can do.  I'd be interested in Tom's thoughts/observations on
the product as well.
Coffenut  :^)
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6) From: Tom & Maria
<Snip>
I have a Rosto to test, again. It is NOT an 8 oz roaster. You will see very
uneven development of the coffee early in the roast stages. If it looks
even later, that does not remedy the fact that the roast developed unevenly
early in the roast. The roast batch size is about 4.2 ounces by weight,
thats about 6 oz by volume, and 2 volume oz more than the hearthware. The
Alp is 8 oz by weight. However, at this 4.2 ounces some coffees work and
others dont, dependent on bean size. Yirgacheffe (small bean) will roast
fairly evenly at 4.2 oz, but Colombian 18 screen wouldnt. The reason for
this limitation is that you can exceed the trough-like channel that the
coffee rotates in, or it simply WILL NOT agitate coffee early in the roast.
I really dont know why anyone has called this an 8 oz *by volume* roaster!
Its not a matter of line voltage either ...its a physical limitation that
determines adequate movement of the coffee eary in the roast./ The machine
seems solid and built to last. The fan and heat element are good quality,
the plastic casing is think, almost like bakelite. The metal parts are
stainless ...nice! Like the HW Gourmet it has a mechanical timer, and blows
hot air continuously. It is louder than a HWP, perhaps even louder than a
Gourmet. The chaff collection is 95 % effective. It is not easy to remove
the chaff screen and clean ..it basically requires a shop vac to suck out
chaff from the lower chaff screen. In terms of roast results, it seems good
but bean size and batch weight variables are going to put this in the
league of the ALP in terms of the user effort to use. It will make users
want to be conservative and stick to a few known coffees, and established
batch sizes. CXracks are moderately easy to hear. Viewing is from overhead,
fairly good. It is a roaster I would use outdoors, for sure. It is very
good at roasting dark too. All in all, there are some reasons to carry it
but it needs to be described accurately, like the Alp. Its $150. I think
the people distributing it are good, and the warranty is solid too...
                  "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
           Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
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7) From: Young McQueen
I was hesitant to discuss my experiences with this roaster since Tom does
not carry it...but the dam seems to have been broken so here goes.
I bought my Caffe Rosto when BOTH my Hearthware roasters were with them for
repair/replacement.
I wanted to love the CR since the batch size of the Hearthware products is
just too small.  The CR looks very well made: The timer is much better than
the Gourmet's and having a off/on switch really is handy; it feels heavy and
well made.
Results:  I ended up with a batch size of 150 grams (1/3 of a pound) --very
handy.  It did not handle 170 grams or even 160 grams. (Based on Tom's
results I will try 140 grams next time or even 130)  The early movement of
beans when green/heavy seems too little.  They end up very uneven if roasted
to city but appear more even when roasted dark.  This is such a difference
that I find I only use it now for darker roast.
The exhaust of air is on the front--right into your face.  The chaff
collector  does not work well for me.  I find a lot of chaff still in the
coffee and a shop vac is ABSOLUTELY needed to clean out the collector.  Also
you must clean it BEFORE you remove the coffee.
To remove coffee you must pick up and upturn the whole unit...of course
there is NO handle and it can be hot if you touch the wrong place...lousy
design.
On occasion I have removed the top to see the beans more clearly.  Of course
the plastic, flat "0" ring falls off and into the hot coffee.
I wanted so badly to like this roaster.  But after 30 or so roasts I just
don't.
Of the three: Gourmet, Precision, and CR.  I find I am using the Gourmet
most -- about 10: 2: 1.
I believe the coffee from the CR does NOT taste as good but I really have
NOT done the blind testing to say that with authority.
I roast 90% for drip/vac/or presspot and only 10% or less for espresso.
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8) From: coffenut
Young McQ,
I appreciate your candid review of this roaster and believe it helps us all
to know how the product fares from a user perspective.  Based upon Tom's and
your experiences, this product's capability appears to fall short of what it
is supposed to do.  I'd certainly be considering a request for a refund
unless it delivers on some need that is justifiable to you.  Thanks for the
review.
Coffenut  :^)
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9) From: Michael Rochman
<Snip>
all
to know how the product fares from a user perspective.  Based upon Tom's and
your experiences, this product's capability appears to fall short of what it
is supposed to do.  I'd certainly be considering a request for a refund
unless it delivers on some need that is justifiable to you.  Thanks for the
review.
I probably should not be sticking my face into this thread...however, I've
had an original production prototype of this roaster since before they had a
US importer.
My findings are similar to the other reviews concerning construction, build,
looks, quality, etc.
Where my opinion differs from the other reviews is twofold...
First, I had zero problems roasting with it. All roasts were quite like I
expected them to be. Thus, I would not discount this roaster because of the
way it roasts. And, I found a way to get the chaff collector out of the
roaster, using my fingernail. A bit tricky, certainly should be unnecessary,
yet effective.
My quibble was with the design: It's made about half backwards.
The design bothers me because the exhaust vent on the Rosto is on the front.
It should be on the rear, in order that all users might easily vent it out.
While it doesn't emit much smoke, I was able to set off our alarm with the
overhead stove exhaust fan turned off with the unit facing forward. When I
turned the unit backwards, it did not set off our smoke detectors.
It sits in our basement without being further used by us. Not because of
ease of application. It's easy to use and it's very easy to see where you
are with each roast. It's in the basement because we seek larger roasts than
it handily provides. We use the Alp and would like something with twice it's
capacity for home use. Still looking...
Mike
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10) From: Young McQueen
More opinions of mine:
My machine will NOT roast below DARK Full City without a very UNEVEN roast
and coffee is often full of chaff even at darker roast.
I roast 150 grams per. (1lb = 454 grams)
Machine is Well Built, I love the quality of the timer and having an off/on
switch.  Machine has a solid feel.
Machine design sucks--Turning the whole machine over to remove coffee and
needing to vacuum first to remove chaff.
Did I get a bad machine? Maybe! I had mine before Tom starting carrying but
the design still sucks.
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11) From: Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin
Caffe Rosto
Morning All
I received an Email back from the makers of Caffe Rosto to my query for retail outlets for the Rosto in either – Paris, London, Hong Kong or Australia.  Sorry to say, it is not sold by retail in any of these places – hard to believe huh?!  I might have to get it shipped to me after all and just hope the nice Customs man is in a good mood on the day it arrives ....
Have a good weekend all.  We are currently between anti-cyclones which means cool sunny days (well, cool for us at around 19C, I don’t do Fahrenheit) just perfect for sitting in the sun with coffee, a book and the dog.
Cheers
Wendy
Wendy Austin & Thomas Oswin 
Coastal Road, Pomponette Beach
Mauritius Island
Tel/fax/ans (230) 6257399 
Mobile (230) 2560182

12) From: Len and Sharon Borovay
My hearthware is about to go, I can hear the whining of the motor when it
starts up. I always roast to past the second crack, so I am wondering if I
should get the caffe rosto instead of another hearthware or the freshroast.
I don't read much about that roaster here. Does anyone use it and love it or
hate it?
Sharon
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13) From: Jim Friedlander
I know this isn't what you asked about, but I just acquired a Fresh
Roast+, after using a Hearthware for a while.  I just LOVE the Fresh
Roast+, especially what winds up in the cup :)
jim

14) From: Mike McGinness
Been using it since April '01 and love it. From City to French (or charcoal
once not paying attention) no problem.
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA

15) From: ooi
Get the Fresh Roast Plus!  It's a great machine!  Fresh Roast is great too!
Len and Sharon Borovay wrote:
<Snip>
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16) From: Jacobean
The Caffe Rosto is a wonderful machine. The larger batch amount really sets it 
apart from the others.
Additionally, you'll notice it doesn't have nearly the amount of failures as 
comparable machines.
<Snip>
or
<Snip>
Jacobean
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17) From: Andy Conn
Have it.  Love it.   Made the move from my Poppery I and haven't thought
twice:
1 -  Much Bigger batch
2 -  Better for dark roasts - i agree
3 -  Not fool proof, but more so than the Poppery.
- Andy

18) From: Len and Sharon Borovay
Thanks for all of your input. We ordered the caffe rosto and cannot wait for
it to arrive!
Sharon
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19) From: Chris Lussier
Greetings all,
I just joined this list and have a few questions.
I am roasting with a caffe rosto 120 and have been struggling to achieve
anything close to a french/expresso blends.  I have used a variety of beans
and none have come close to this darkness.  Even after turning back the
timer and running the machine for 23 minutes, I still can't achieve a second
pop.
I have varied the amount of beans from the standard 1 cup (4oz) to 5oz, 6oz,
even 8oz.  Less than 4 oz did not seem to do much more than spin around.
Anythoughts out there?  And no I am not using an extention cord.
Help?
Chris Lussier
clussier
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20) From: Henry C. Davis
I don't have one, but if this were to be your complaint using a
precision, the advice of many would be to increase the amount of
beans in the roasting batch. Did you try that with the rosto?

21) From: Michael Nelson
On Mon, Apr 08, 2002 at 08:22:26PM -0400, Chris Lussier wrote:
-> I am roasting with a caffe rosto 120 and have been struggling to achieve
-> anything close to a french/expresso blends.  I have used a variety of beans
-> and none have come close to this darkness.  Even after turning back the
-> timer and running the machine for 23 minutes, I still can't achieve a second
-> pop.
Me either.  I've let mine run for over 30 minutes only to get to about a
full city roast.
I'm not at all impressed with the Cafe Rosto.  It's also noisy, blows chaff
all over the place, and I have even had problems with it blowing its own lid
off... it literally lifts the lid up and then blows chaff and hot air out
unless I hold it down.
Another $150 wasted.
I'm back to using the HIP until *it* fails again.
Michael
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22) From: europachris
Two questions: 1) WHERE are you roasting?  i.e. how cold is it?  2) do you have anything else on the same circuit?  If you have an older home or just live in an area with poor line voltage, that could be a problem.
You may have a dud unit, also.  What color are the finished beans?
Chris
"Chris Lussier"  wrote:
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23) From: dewardh
Chris:
Three places to start with your troubleshooting (and yes, this can be a "problem" with the Rosto, 
especially if any of the three items below are "off"):
1) Use the measuring cup provided, full (8 oz volume, about 150 grams).  The beans should come up 
to the lip of the dome, and they will move in stops and starts until the beans lose some moisture 
and expand a bit.  The modest movement is not a problem since the hot air is coming out from all 
those slots under the dome, rather than in a single jet (as in the HWP).  If initially they don't 
seem to be moving at all just tip or shake the roaster a little . . . once they start moving they 
don't seem inclined to stop completely.
2) Ambient (room) temperature must be at least 65 F. . . . the Rosto is not the machine of choice 
for a cold garage or other unheated space (unless you're on the high side for line voltage).
3) You must have  a supply voltage of 110-112 V. measured at the outlet you're using, with the 
Rosto heater on.  Higher is better, right up to 118-120 V. (but too much higher than 120 and you 
risk blowing the Rosto's internal fuse).  Your supply can vary dramatically over the course of the 
day, btw. Where I sit (in urban Berkeley) I'll often see 118-120 V. (and sometimes over that) in 
the early morning, sometimes dropping so low on a chilly evening that it trips my computer's UPS on 
(106-107 V.).  Without a Variac or a boost transformer I simply cannot roast in the evening with my 
Rosto (or with my HWP for that matter).
All the above accounted for I still have to go over the "normal" 13 minute maximum roast time for 
some slow roasting beans like Sumatra Mandheling, so the bean you're roasting can make considerable 
difference, too.  And sometimes I roast with deliberately low voltage specifically to make the 
roast take longer . . . (although I'm unconvinced of any benefit past 13-14 minutes).  If what 
you're looking for is that almost-black-beans-stuck-together-by-the-surface-oil roast you will 
probably only get it from the Rosto in a bordering-on-uncomfortably-hot room at upper limit high 
line voltage.  Of course as your taste for home roasted coffee develops you'll come to wonder why 
you ever wanted anything like that .
You'll also find that there has been considerable discussion of roast temperature and conditions 
over the past couple of weeks here on the homeroast list . . . check out the archives . . . most of 
it directed specifically at the HWP, but the general considerations apply across the board.
Hope that's enough to get you going . . .
Deward
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24) From: Michael Nelson
On Tue, Apr 09, 2002 at 09:02:52AM -0400, Henry C. Davis wrote:
-> I don't have one, but if this were to be your complaint using a
-> precision, the advice of many would be to increase the amount of
-> beans in the roasting batch. Did you try that with the rosto?
I've tried up to a heaping measure (the measure supplied by the mfg) as they
suggest, and it helps, but it still won't get past Full City.
I've talked to the mfg Brightway on the phone, and they asked me to send it
back, so after trying several more times I've just finished boxing it up and
have called UPS for a pickup tomorrow.
Another eighteen bucks down the drain.
Michael
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25) From: dewardh
Michael:
<Snip>
then blows chaff and hot air out unless I hold it down.
Two thoughts . . . is it possible that you've lost the clear "rubber" gasket that seals the glass 
part of the lid to the roast chamber?  On mine the lid is quite difficult to remove (when hot) with 
the gasket in place.  Without that gasket the Rosto also will leak a little chaff . . .  And, are 
you being "religious" about cleaning out the chaff filter(s)?  They are too small . . . and any 
blockage could increase internal pressure . . .
Deward
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26) From: Henry C. Davis
If the replacement doesn't work well either, presuming you are roasting
inside where it is reasonably warm, check your voltage at the outlet and
make sure there is no load or dimmer switch on the same circuit. You aren't
using an extension cord are you?
(Not that I want to start that discussion up again since we beat it to death
twice in the last year or so. :-) However, as we all - apparently - agree,
it CAN have an effect on a roaster's performance.)

27) From: Michael Nelson
On Tue, Apr 09, 2002 at 08:24:20AM -0700, dewardh wrote:
-> Two thoughts . . . is it possible that you've lost the clear "rubber" gasket that seals the glass 
-> part of the lid to the roast chamber?
Nope.  It's there.
-> you being "religious" about cleaning out the chaff filter(s)?
Yep.  I wash the removable one in warm soapy water and use a vacuum to clean
the internal one.
My understanding of this thing is that if you live in Arizona and it's
summertime and you can plug it *directly* (no extension cords allowed!!)
into the power generators of the Glen Canyon dam that it will work ok.
I'm not sure I want to move to Arizona just to roast coffee.
Michael
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28) From: dewardh
Michael:
<Snip>
summertime and you can plug it *directly* (no extension cords allowed!!)
into the power generators of the Glen Canyon dam that it will work ok.
Well . . . it's not quite *that* bad  . . . (I'm sure you've seen my comments to Chris earlier 
today . . .)
<Snip>
Nope .  But I've managed to make mine work (in Berkeley) with a little attention to detail . . . 
(and my HWP too, which though not as voltage/temperature sensitive as the Rosto won't work here at 
night (low voltage) either . . .).  The villain is not Brightway . . . it's PG&E.
Of course it's possible to design a machine to overcome voltage/temperature sensitivities . . . 
Hearthware did that , with at least modest success, in the Precision.  But to do it at the price 
point they wanted they sacrificed reliability, and the rest is history.  I'm much more comfortable 
with the compromises made in the Rosto, because the basic design is sound, and when all the 
"incidentals" are taken care of it produces (to my taste) an excellent roast (and a roast over 
which, in the process of taking care of those "incidentals", I've gained considerable control). 
 Given the right circumstances it works fine right out of the box . . . but you do have to have 
those "right circumstances", or a way to get them . . .
All the available roasters face the same challenges, of course.  It's just a matter of deciding 
which collection of weaknesses and problems you're willing to put up with . . .
Deward
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29) From: Steve Shank
Have you called the Cafe Rosto people and let them know? If they do not get=
 feedback on failed product, they have no way to know that customers are=
 disappointed. If their thermostats or heating elements are failing, and=
 they are not told, they will continue to buy from that vendor.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 04/09/2002 at 6:11 AM Michael Nelson wrote:
<Snip>
 achieve
<Snip>
 chaff
<Snip>
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.steveshank.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

30) From: Michael Nelson
On Tue, Apr 09, 2002 at 01:08:27PM -0700, Steve Shank wrote:
-> Have you called the Cafe Rosto people and let them know?
Yep, I called them the day I got it, described the problems, and they gave
me a Return Authorization Number and asked that I ship it back to them.  I
screwed around with it for a week and today finally packed the POS up and
called UPS to take it back to them tomorrow.
I also let Sweet Maria's know, since that's where I bought it.
-> If they do not
-> get feedback on failed product, they have no way to know that customers are
-> disappointed. If their thermostats or heating elements are failing, and they
-> are not told, they will continue to buy from that vendor.
Oh, they know.  They know about mine and I have read of several other folks
who have had CR-120s that also had extremely weak performance, not the least
of which was the first one Deward received... see:
 http://www.coffeegeek.com/reviews/accessories/cafferosto/dewardhSo far I'm zero for two on coffee roasters... my Home Innovations Precision
died after two weeks and less than 10 roasts, and this thing is anemic right
out of the box.  Fortunately, the HIP base has been replaced and it's
working fine (at least for the first four roasts) so far.
I'm hoping the next Cafe Warmo will be able to get beyond "simmer".
Michael
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31) From: dewardh
Michael:
<Snip>
not the least of which was the first one Deward received...
 Part of the reason I'm so explicit with my comments (and recommendations) regarding the Rosto is 
that I'm no longer sure that the initial problems I had were entirely Brightway's fault.  Perhaps I 
should go back and amend the Coffeegeek review to make that clear.  There is, unfortunately, no way 
to get that machine back to see how it performs knowing what I know now . . .
It will be interesting to see what experience Chris has if he tries the suggestions I made, and it 
would be interesting to know in the context of those suggestions the conditions you were roasting 
under.
What batch size were you using?
What beans were you roasting?
What was the room temperature where you were roasting?
What was the line voltage (loaded) at the socket you were plugged in to?
If you don't know the voltage, what is the state of the wiring at your location . . . (new 
building, 75 year old apartment, whatever), were there any other major appliances on at the time, 
what time of day was it . . . (I'm presuming that PG&E drops voltage in the evenings in SF just as 
they do here in Berkeley).
It would clearly help a lot of potential Rosto buyers to give them some idea of what circumstances 
to avoid to get the performance from a Rosto which it certainly can deliver . . .
Deward
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32) From: Michael Nelson
On Tue, Apr 09, 2002 at 02:21:43PM -0700, dewardh wrote:
-> What batch size were you using?
I first tried 113g weighed out, that was way too little, according to
Brightway support.  I then tried Sweet Maria's recommendation of 4,5, and
6oz. by volume.  I then tried a full measure (the measure supplied witht the
CR.  Then I tried a slightly heaping measure.  All resulted in very long
roast times and failure to reach a second crack.  The most I could get after
1/2 hour was what I'd estimate as Full City.
-> What beans were you roasting?
Tom's Moka Kadir and Malabar Gold.
-> What was the room temperature where you were roasting?
Low 60s.  I didn't measure it, but it was a sunny bright spring day,
mid-morning, indoors but with the windows open.
-> What was the line voltage (loaded) at the socket you were plugged in to?
I didn't measure it loaded, but it was 121.6 unloaded.
-> If you don't know the voltage, what is the state of the wiring at your location . . . (new 
-> building, 75 year old apartment, whatever)
It's an OLD building.  So old that there are capped-off gaslight fixtures in
the kitchen and bathroom, so the building predates the wiring by at least a
few years.
-> were there any other major appliances on at the time,
No.
-> what time of day was it . . . (I'm presuming that PG&E drops voltage in the evenings in SF just as 
-> they do here in Berkeley).
Mid-morning.
I tried it both on a 15' 12ga extension cord on one circuit (so I could
exhaust out the window), as well as plugged directly into an outlet in the
kitchen, a different circuit).
The Hearthware Home Innovations Precision works fine in all those situations
and circuits, BTW, if it works at all. ;-)  That's the thing about the
Precision... it either works great or fails completely.  None of this wishy
washy stuff the Cafe Luke-O does.
I do appreciate your trying to help, you're being very patient.  I fear
though that in my situation, the CR is not gonna cut it.  We have few
outlets in this old house, and in order to minimize the smoke and smell I'm
probably going to have to run it on an extension cord near a window.  I
would think that a quality 12ga extension cord shouldn't have significant
voltage drop (I'll check it under load when I get the CR back), but
unfortunately getting the stupid thing to blow out the window also means
that the intake air is probably cooler than it needs.
Perhaps it will work better on warmer days in our SF Indian Summer... but I
do think it's a pretty poor design to be so sensitive to line voltage and
ambient temperature.  I think the state of the art in home roasters needs
some significant advancement.  The HotTop looks promising, and I'm willing
to pay up to $500 for a machine that actually works as advertised.
Michael
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Michael Nelson                                  San Francisco, CA
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33) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Michael Nelson" 
<Snip>
If your voltage is good and you're roasting at 65f-70f ambient temperature
as previously noted by someone else, then your Rosto is indeed a defective
unit. I've been using a Cafe' Rosto for over a year, 100's of roasts, FC
average time 8 minutes depending on bean, Vienna in 9-10, roasting 5.3
weighed oz batches. The times you're talking, full 13 on the dial then full
13 again without cooling would have totally incinerated even the ashes on
mine... I've roasted in 20f in the garage no problem using a 2ft to a side
cube box, no top, front panel cut as a flap to adjust amount of hot air kept
in. Still full13 on the dial would produce total charcoal. Guess I was lucky
and got a good unit and lucky to have good consistent power. I've roasted at
all times of different days of the week, very little variation. I even added
a power strip to see if it would adversely lower the performance, maybe
added 15sec to the roast time if I recall.
I wish you luck in your replacement unit.
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

34) From: Chris Lussier
Greetings all,
I just joined this list and have a few questions.
I am roasting with a caffe rosto 120 and have been struggling to achieve
anything close to a french/expresso blends.  I have used a variety of beans
and none have come close to this darkness.  Even after turning back the
timer and running the machine for 23 minutes, I still can't achieve a second
pop.
I have varied the amount of beans from the standard 1 cup (4oz) to 5oz, 6oz,
even 8oz.  Less than 4 oz did not seem to do much more than spin around.
Anythoughts out there?  And no I am not using an extention cord.
Help?
Chris Lussier
clussier
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35) From: Bob Trancho
Try this:
- Take a piece of aluminum foil about 6" long.
- starting at the short (6") end, fold over about 1/2 - 5/8"
- fold over and over about 6 times
- trim the excess
- remove the chaff screen
- thread the resulting strip in the right end exhaust vent (from the
front) 
- thread it out the other (left) end exhaust vent
- fold back the excess to hold it in place
- replace the chaff screen
You have now blocked about 60% of the air from exhausting and it will
recirculate back through the unit
I have found that I get to first crack in 3 1/2 - 5 minutes and 2nd
crack in 8 - 10 minutes with this mod, depending on the variety of bean
and weight roasted.  I roast 150 gms in a batch ( 5 1/4 oz).  I do not
recommend going by volume if you want to get consistent results with the
Rosto.  Roast manually, the timer is useless.  Set it the to max amount
of time and manually switch to cooling when the roast is done.  I pull
out the foil when I start the cooling cycle it increase air flow
(careful, it will be hot).
Hope this helps,
Bob Trancho
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

36) From: Joe Frabosilio
    I really know nothing about coffee.  I purchased the Caffe Rosto, to
start learning about Roasting.  My experience is only positive.  I
ordered 4lbs of different types of green coffee and started to play
around.  Some batchs were 9 mins, others 10.5 mins.  I gave samples to
all kinds of different coffee drinkers.  Some who purchase Maxwell
House( wanted to tell them that they are buying coffee dust, but didn't
have the heart) to others who claim to be experts on coffee.
    Result, they all liked the coffee.  I did probe them a lot, was the
coffee too bitter, did it taste burnt, the grind too fine, if this
coffee Cost $7.00 per lbs would you buy it?
    Since I don't roast everyday/all day, I always pre-heat the unit for
4 mins.  Now that the outside temp is getting warmer (Dallas/Fort Worth
Texas), I'll experiment some more.
    I was looking at purchasing the Commercial Pro 1500 unit.  Tried to
find a used unit but wasn't able to.
    I would recommend the Caffe Rosto to anyone who is home roasting.
Joe Frabosilio
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37) From: Mike M
FWIW, I've been using a Cafe Rosto for the last year without problems. It
will roast to second crack in about 8-9 minutes. I had problems roasting
indoors in front of an open window in the Winter (the cold air prevented it
from heating properly), until I began placing a video tape case on its side
in front of the machine and two on end on either side to make a bit of an
air block to keep cold air from being sucked into the roaster. In the warm
months I roast outside.
If it turns out that your house current is low, try placing the roaster in a
small box. I tried that a few times and found that it got very hot very fast
and greatly reduced the roast time (as in "oops, charcoal beans"). I don't
do that anymore because the video case trick works better for me.
Mike M
<Snip>
beans
<Snip>
second
<Snip>
6oz,
<Snip>
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38) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Mike M" 
<Snip>
Is there a pattern? If your initials are MM, especially named Mike M, then
your Caffe' Rosto will work for sure. Mine's has too for over a year. Else
it seems it's a crap shoot! (More than likely early manufacturing was
changed to reduce costs and/or a part supplier was switched or something
along those lines so latter models seem less consistent. Just a thought.)
Mike M;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
Caffe' Rosto - Miss Silvia - Solis Maestro. Great Combo IMO.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

39) From: Michael Nelson
On Wed, Apr 10, 2002 at 09:02:39AM -0700, Mike McGinness wrote:
-> Is there a pattern? If your initials are MM, especially named Mike M, then
-> your Caffe' Rosto will work for sure. Mine's has too for over a year. Else
-> it seems it's a crap shoot! (More than likely early manufacturing was
-> changed to reduce costs and/or a part supplier was switched or something
-> along those lines so latter models seem less consistent. Just a thought.)
I'm reserving final judgement on mine until I get it back from repair.  UPS
just picked it up, and since Brightway is very close by (they are in
Fremont, just across the bay and a bit south), I should hopefully get it
back soon.
Michael
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Michael Nelson                                  San Francisco, CA
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40) From: Bob Trancho
I've only had my Rosto since January, but it's been rock solid. ...and
my initials are not MM !!
Bob Trancho
<Snip>
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

41) From: Steve Shank
I fully agree with your desires in a roaster, less sensitive to external=
 conditions is Number 1 on my list. However, I've found the precision to be=
 enormously variable and not at all in the "works or doesn't" group. I=
 worked with them for a long time switching out jumpers to try and get more=
 heat from mine or else it would act exactly as your costa rosto does.=
 Finally, they replaced the base unit, but it is still my summer roaster,=
 and I use the Gourmet when it is below say 55, or roast in a box. Other=
 people have had great results with the CR and also with the hwp. It seems=
 to me that the thermostats used in both these units are quite variable=
 from machine to machine, so when they set it for the fan to start cooling=
 at 500 degrees, sometimes it registers 500 at 475 say, which is only a 5%=
 margin of error, and by the time it gets up to the beans which are cooled=
 by the outside air, it is down to 430 and bakes. I also tend to think they=
 do not use steel ball bearings, but rather bushings, from the number of=
 failures they are getting.
Mike Nelson wrote: 
<Snip>
 situations
and circuits, BTW, if it works at all. ;-)  That's the thing about the
Precision... it either works great or fails completely.  None of this wishy
washy stuff the Cafe Luke-O does.
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.steveshank.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

42) From: Michael Nelson
On Wed, Apr 10, 2002 at 02:12:15PM -0700, Steve Shank wrote:
<Snip>
If you've worked with them for a long time, you're probably talking about
the older black base Hearthware Precision.  Mine is the newer white base
model, named "Home Innovations Precision Coffee Roaster", which is a
different model than the black base one.  I'm not saying it's better (mine
failed in the first two weeks), but it's different.
Michael
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Michael Nelson                                  San Francisco, CA
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43) From: Steve Shank
No, same one. white base, home innovations Precision.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 04/10/2002 at 4:15 PM Michael Nelson wrote:
<Snip>
 all
<Snip>
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.steveshank.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

44) From: dewardh
Michael:
<Snip>
I wouldn't normally expect a more than ten Volt drop, but with old wiring it can happen.  Or, also 
possible, we may both have originally got machines from a batch with not-strong-enough heaters . . 
..
<Snip>
the kitchen and bathroom, so the building predates the wiring by at least a
few years.
My house in Berkeley (built in 1908) was like that when I bought it in 1969 . . . all the overhead 
gas plumbing still in place.  In the living room they had hung the overhead light fixture from the 
gas pipe, which they had cut (hack sawed) in the attic and into which they had threaded the supply 
wires.  No A-head, no bushing even, just a couple wraps of friction tape where the wire entered the 
pipe.  Old time craftsmanship sometimes wasn't . . .
There were no electric outlets anywhere in the house . . . what appliances there were got their 
power from screw-in adapters that converted a light socket into an "outlet" (sometimes two 
"outlets" and an extension socket for the light bulb).  Such things were commonly available in 
hardware stores . . . they, and a tangle of wires coming down from the ceiling or from valence 
lighting on the walls, were common in older East Bay and San Francisco houses and apartments.
Wouldn't have worked for roasting  . . .
<Snip>
ambient temperature.
It's an almost unavoidable problem without some kind of temperature feedback control.  If you aim 
for a longer roast time, like the Rosto does (for some good reasons) then you cannot avoid some 
sensitivity to low voltage and low inlet air temperature (with the results that we have both seen). 
 If you size the heater to work at 106 Volts in a cold room then with higher voltages and high 
ambient you get roast times of a couple minutes, as with the Fresh Roast and many "poppers". If you 
fail to build reliability into the control you get failures, as with the HWP and, to some extent, 
with the Alpenrost (although the Alpenrost has so many design flaws it's hard to know where to 
begin).
<Snip>
some significant advancement.
No argument there . . .
<Snip>
that actually works as advertised.
I'm expecting their "direct on TV" marketing plan to bring it in at a very significantly lower 
price than that (if their plan actually works) . . . but that, of course, remains to be seen.  And, 
there's many a slip tween . . . the "promise" and what we actually will see.  As I have seen it 
describe so far it lacks both the thing I consider important bordering on essential . . . a way to 
control the temperature of the roast air, and a way to measure the temperature of the beans.  Being 
able to see the beans is a great plus for a drum machine, and reports do suggest that it is able to 
produce an even roast . . .
Deward
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

45) From: Michael Nelson
Just got email from Steve at Brightway, he says they're sending me a new
unit.  He didn't mention what he'd found when testing mine, but I'm assuming
that if he's sending me a new one, he found mine to be defective.  I hope
the new one works right.
Michael
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Michael Nelson                                  San Francisco, CA
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46) From: Rick Farris
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Greetings,
 
My Caffe Rosto arrived yesterday.  It's definitely a well-made machine.
Much sturdier than my HIP.  And way more amenable to drilling and
general hacking up for instrumentation.
 
Now I need two things:  
 
miKe: Would you describe your "best practices" with your Rosto after you
got your Variac, but before you split out the fan and heater separately?
When you "rocked" did you hold the Rosto with the timer toward you and
tilt it away from you?  What voltages did you use at various points in
the roast?  Would you repost the URL to the site with pictures of your
machine?
 
Deward (and any others who have instrumented their Rostos): Do you have
pictures of how you mounted your thermocouples?
 
Thanks,
 
-- Rick
 

47) From: miKe mcKoffee

48) From: Rick Farris
miKe writes:
<Snip>
Yeah, I know.  I want to use it long enough "stock" to be sure that it
doesn't suffer from some of the problems with the last version of the
Rosto.  Then I'll start hacking.
<Snip>
Good point.  Thanks.
-- Rick

49) From: Rick Farris
miKe wrote:
<Snip>
So does your thermometer go through the opening to the chaff collector,
down into the roast chamber?  How far from the bottom?
-- Rick

50) From: stephen rouse
Yeah, I know.  I want to use it long enough "stock" to be sure that it
doesn't suffer from some of the problems with the last version of the
Rosto.  Then I'll start hacking.
-- Rick
Rick-
i admire your restraint. i got a new rosto last week and greeted the 
UPS driver with a torx T-10 in my hand ;)
i now have it set up with a variac and a boost-wired fan control 
(thanks to miKe mcKoffee for his detailed drawings), and i'm very 
pleased with the results. not to mention lots more coffee than the FR!
-stephen

51) From: Rick Farris
Stephen writes:
<Snip>
Heh heh heh.  Well, I also have a HotTop coming next week, so who knows,
I may be modifiying the Rosto sooner, than later.
<Snip>
There are drawings?  I studied the pictures on Mike's website, but I was
hoping there might be schematics available.
-- Rick

52) From: stephen rouse
<Snip>
hoping there might be schematics available.
sorry, i meant pictures. i made a schematic drawing of the fan 
control before i built it (easier to follow than pictures and words).
-stephen

53) From: miKe mcKoffee

54) From: Rick Farris
Stephen says (wrt Caffé Rosto modification details):
<Snip>
Amen.  I don't suppose you could take a reasonably high resolution photo
of the schematic you drew, could you?  If you don't have a website to
post it on, I can help if you email me the picture.
-- Rick

55) From: Rick Farris (home)
Damn it.  I unboxed my new Cafe Rosto this afternoon to give it its
inaugural roast,  I measured out and prepared 150 gram batches of Oaxacan,
PRYS, and Sumatra "Classic."  It says in the manual to do a four-minute
"empty" roast to "season" the unit, so I started it up empty.
I had my Variac and my new suicide cord hooked up, so I noted that the AC
voltage dropped seven volts (from 120 VAC to 113 VAC) when I turned it on.
Two minutes later I was surprised when the voltage, all by itself, popped
back up to 120 VAC.
Yep, you guessed it.  The thermal fuse (I'm assuming) blew during the first
two minutes of the brand new unit's operation. 
Now I've got to make a decision.  I wish Kona Mike was still talking to me.
If the CR is fundamentally sound, but in order to get UL approval they had
to add thermal "protection", I'd just as soon keep the unit, bypass the
fuse, split out the fan, install a thermocouple and roast away.
On the other hand, if there is something else fundamentally different
between these new units and the older ones, then I should send it back.
-- Rick

56) From: David Gwyn
Rick,
I'm deeply troubled by your news. I'm waiting on the return of my CR and
sure hope the unit lasts longer that two minutes. Hopefully Steve from
Brightway is getting the manufacturing issues resolved in Korea and these
problems will soon be behind us. Good luck with your decision and keep us
posted.
Thanks,
Dave

57) From: Rick Farris (home)
I have the advantage that since it is an out-of-box failure, I can return it
to the retailer (SweetMaria's, of course) for a new one.  But if the new one
is going to be exactly the same, why bother?  I was planning on hacking it
up anyway.
As long as the fan and the heating element are ok, why worry about the
thermal fuse?  It's not like I'm going to start it up and then go watch TV.
That's what the HotTop is for!  :-)
-- Rick

58) From: Rich Adams

59) From: dewardh
Rick:
<Snip>
install a
thermocouple and roast away.
I would never suggest, in a public place anyway, doing with the fuse =
exactly
what I would do if (when ) I blow one.  Or any of the rest of it, =
either
(voids the waranty, doncha know).
Deward
Ps  but if you do, then install two thermocouples . . . one for roast =
air, the
other for the beans (I'd almost say, if you can have only one, measure =
roast air
.. . . there are other ways to know the "state of the roast", but no =
other way to
know how much heat you're pumping into the roast chamber . . .)

60) From: Rick Farris (home)
Do you have any pictures, Deward?  Now that miKe is no longer talking to me,
you're my last Cafe Rosto resource.  Could you at least describe to me your
thermocouple placement?
And, oh yeah, could you tell me one more time where to get the 3/16" ss
tubing?
-- Rick

61) From: Brice D. Hornback
What are you guys using for thermocouples?  How are you placing them in the
roast chamber?
By the way:
Stainless T-316
Welded Tube
0.1875" x 0.02" x 0.1475"http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cfm?pidh37&step=4&showunits=inches- Brice

62) From: dewardh
Rick:
<Snip>
Soon.  We've now got a Nikon digital, and it shouldn't be too hard to get up a
"personal web page" when we get back from vacation (mid July).  Probably
something before August.
<Snip>
I'll see if I can find my previous descriptions and post them again with the
pictures.  Should all be in the archives.
<Snip>
tubing?
I got, and use, 1/8 OD thinwall from the rod, bar, flat, angle and tube bin at
the Orchard Supply Hardware in Berkeley.  It looks a lot like what you find at
any decent hardware or hobby shop.  There's a tag on one piece that says
"SteelWorkS SS RND TUBE 1/8" 1FT (.014).  Price was $4.09 (plus tax).
Deward

63) From: Bob Trancho
Here are some pics of how I placed the thermocouple in my Rosto back
when I was still using it (pre-Hottop).
www.trancho.net/javastuff
Bob
<Snip>

64) From: Rick Farris
Hey, that's great, Bob.  Other than the little notch in the chaff
collector, there is no cutting and drilling.
-- Rick

65) From: pcevoli
Hi Folks,
Long time no read :-) Quick question, I roasted my Caffe Rosto, I'll be laying it to rest sometime this week. What happened to the company? Caffe Rostos are discontinued, looks like the company that manufactured it was recently bought. Is the Rosto going the way of other deceased roasters? I thought it was a neat roaster but I did push it very hard, cooked the heating element.
Thanks in advance.
Paul

66) From: DC
Hi,
If you're going to throw it away, I'll take it and pay shipping.
Thanks,
David
Paul Cevoli wrote:
<Snip>

67) From: miKe mcKoffee
Are you sure it's the heating element that's fried? I've pushed multiple 
Rostos very hard and never fried the heating element itself. First thing to 
check with no heat usually is the thermal fuse. Check it's continuity. Those 
I have seen go toast, then no heat. Simply replace or by-pass it. (Well, 
first thing could be is it plugged in;-0 The other "first thing" is 
confirming continuity of all internal connections.) The thermal limiter 
could also have fried. Again check continuity. And same goes for checking 
the heating coil, check continuity!
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
3rd Annual Pacific Northwest Sweet Maria's Home Roasters Gathering infohttp://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmFrom: "Paul Cevoli" ">http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/pnwgIII.htmURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmFrom: "Paul Cevoli" 
Sent: Wednesday, May 25, 2005 10:58 AM
<Snip>

68) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I am still undecided what to use to start roasting.  I have already =
ordered the 8 lb. sampler from SM, plus 1 lb. of Italian roast blend and =
1 lb. of Ugh to practice with.  
Several people have mentioned that they like the Caffe Rosto, but it has =
been discontinued.  I found out that it is still sold in Canada so I can =
still get one.  What are the good and bad points about this roaster?  =
Several people have suggested the dog bowl method to start and I might =
do this just for experience, but would probably not use this as a =
regular method.  
I have a good convection oven so I have considered spreading the beans =
on a pizza screen and putting them into it.  It has a good air flow and =
would probably do a good job, but the downside is I could not see the =
beans well during the roast.  
Mike

69) From: miKe mcKoffee
Since I've been Rosto roastin' going on 5yrs guess that's my queue!
The Rosto has gone through a number of manufacturing changes over the =
years.
Consequently exactly how one you'd purchase now will perform stock is =
hard
to say. I believe the ones currently for sale are either old stock or =
some
places have refurbs the mfg is wholesaling.
I have three Rostos, all behaved differently stock. For long time now =
all
three split wired modified for independent variable voltage control of =
fan
and heater making them identical performance wise.
One production run the fan motors were too strong making it impossible =
to
reach high enough temps any bean load any voltage, stock that is. Split
wired it's a champ with that kick butt motor when you need it. 
Biggest likely failure points are the thermal fuse blowing killing all =
power
to the heater. This is common with the Rosto. Simple to by-pass though =
some
people replace it. (All three of mine by-passed.) Secondly some have a =
too
weak thermal limiter causing temp to not get high enough regardless =
slowed
fan/bean load. Only one of my three needed it by-passed. Thirdly over =
time
the fan motor bushings are gonna fry. Not right away, few hundred roasts =
or
so depending on how hard you push it. (And I push mine to the limit!)
Periodic application of high temp grease solves the problem but it's a =
major
pain requiring the same disassembly as replacing the motor. Once the
bearings start to go lubing will give a dozen or so roasts before needed
relubing. You'll know when it's needed, screeches at you! I've replaced =
two
motors, I believe replacement motors can still be purchased.
That said I routinely do 1/2# batches pushing fan @140v, Rosto tilted =
'bout
30°, heater voltage varying to max 130v. Can also easily do 27gr batch =
for a
single double shot! (Seems silly but I did it just to see if I could =
some
time back:-)
Stock a Rosto can do 1/3# with minimal Rosto Rockin' technique or 1/4# =
just
a sittin' there. Of course that's assuming good 120v line voltage. All
electrics, especially air roasters are greatly affected by line voltage
variation. 
Rostos are very easy to split wire modify. Rosto like the covetted P1 =
has an
AC motor making it a piece of cake. Split wired with dual variable =
boosted
voltage control the Rosto is cabable of speed demon 5min French like a =
Fresh
Roast or slow mellow 18min profile like a drum and anything and =
everything
inbetween, you decide. The Rosto doesn't require fast bean movement like =
a
traditional Sivetz air from below fluid bed. It's a hybrid using a =
"donut"
shaped roast champer with the beans blowing in a circle. I use very very
slow movement, like a gentle ocean wave. 
Cup wise a Rosto in the right hands can match about any roaster. Done =
many a
taste comparison and bean swap with other roasters. Then again, any =
roast
method in the hands of someone who's mastered that technique will =
produce
exceptional roasts! Try a fry pan over glowing charcoal heat, no spoon =
or
paddle etc stirring only "toss" stirring allowed. Fun and it works!-)
Geeze, I'm writing a book... So I'll forgoe adventures in taking your =
beans
for a WOK... Your question was after all about the Rosto!
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipeshttp://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
www.MDMProperties.net
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Mike Chester
	Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2005 6:49 PM
	I am still undecided what to use to start roasting.  I have already
ordered the 8 lb. sampler from SM, plus 1 lb. of Italian roast blend and =
1
lb. of Ugh to practice with.  
	Several people have mentioned that they like the Caffe Rosto, but it
has been discontinued.  I found out that it is still sold in Canada so I =
can
still get one.  What are the good and bad points about this roaster?
Several people have suggested the dog bowl method to start and I might =
do
this just for experience, but would probably not use this as a regular
method.  
	I have a good convection oven so I have considered spreading the
beans on a pizza screen and putting them into it.  It has a good air =
flow
and would probably do a good job, but the downside is I could not see =
the
beans well during the roast.  
	 
	Mike

70) From: Marc
Mike,
I too have a Rosto (2 actually) and while my experience (and roasting skill=
)
is much less than Mike McKoffee's I definitely agree with him. I have
modified my Rosto using his mods and have added PID control with help from
Mike Dhabolt. (There's a lot of Mike's around here!)
I feel the Rosto is the right size for the amount of coffee I (and my wife)
drink along with the gifts I give to my friends (i.e., 3-5 roasts per week =
-
I often do 2 back-to-back).
I feel like I have great control (especially using the PID) and can repeat
roasts easily. It takes about 20 minutes per roast (including setup and
cleanup). The main downside is noise: like most air roasters the fan makes =
a
lot of noise, add to that my exhaust fan and a slight hearing problem and I
have a very hard time hearing 1st or, especially, 2nd crack. I often rely o=
n
visual indicators for 1st and 2nd crack - not the best way to do this.
Anyway, I have been very happy with my Rosto and plan on using it, and my
spare one for a long time...
Hope this helps.
Marc
On 10/12/05, Mike Chester  wrote:
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71) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thank you to Mike and Marc as well as the others who responded.  After =
further checking and reading posts on other forums, I have found out =
that the Rosto that the Canadian distributor is selling is a cheapened =
model of the old one, and those that have bought it from them are =
generally disappointed.  One guy reported that his arrived in less than =
perfect working order and this distributor will not answer any requests =
for help, and the manufacturer wants to be paid to fix the defect.  I =
don't want those kind of troubles, so unless a good used one comes =
along, I will have to find a different machine or technique.  There are =
a couple of low mileage used Alpenroasts on eBay, but they are getting =
close to the price that they cost when new.  
Mike - still looking - I will decide soon; honest.

72) From: miKe mcKoffee
Ongoing quality and product consistency challenges with the Korean
manufacturer was why Brightway eventually quit distributing the Caffe'
Rosto... 
miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipeshttp://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
www.MDMProperties.net
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Mike Chester
	Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2005 10:44 AM
	
	Thank you to Mike and Marc as well as the others who responded.
After further checking and reading posts on other forums, I have found out
that the Rosto that the Canadian distributor is selling is a cheapened model
of the old one, and those that have bought it from them are generally
disappointed.  One guy reported that his arrived in less than perfect
working order and this distributor will not answer any requests for help,
and the manufacturer wants to be paid to fix the defect.  I don't want those
kind of troubles, so unless a good used one comes along, I will have to find
a different machine or technique.  There are a couple of low mileage used
Alpenroasts on eBay, but they are getting close to the price that they cost
when new.  
	 
	Mike - still looking - I will decide soon; honest.

73) From: Peter Ertman
I purchased a Café Rosto from Greenbeanery.CA (the Canadian =
distributor)
several months ago and love it. I spent a lot of time talking to them =
about
reliability issues and they stand squarely behind it, in fact will give =
you
store credit for your half of the shipping costs. While I don't like =
dark
roasts, it does great on light and medium. While I don't do pounds and
pounds, the recommended 4.6 oz amount (I use a scale), works for me. I
usually roast on the weekends and enjoy the beans over the week.

74) From: Mr Gnome
Hi Mike,
I'm really new to roasting and have a lot to learn.  Sorry don't know 
anything about the Caffe Rosto I've got an i Roast 2 and it's working great. 
   It needs to be vented and it is too noisy to hear the cracks well but 
otherwise it's putting out a good, even roast.  Still, I'm really new to 
bean roasting.
Kirk
<Snip>
Don't just Search. Find!http://search.sympatico.msn.ca/default.aspxThe new 
MSN Search! Check it out!

75) From: Sandy Andina
When I can, I roast outdoors on the deck (using a long extension  
cord).  But I can usually do about 2-3 loads indoors on the i-Roast  
without stinking up the house too much:  I crack the back door, turn  
on the ceiling fan and range hood (a recirculating filter, alas) and  
place the roaster on the center of the stovetop (between the burners)  
directly underneath the hood.  Nonetheless, I get enough coffee smoke  
to make the house smell good--any more than that and it could be as  
much of a health hazard as wood smoke from the fireplace.  I will  
eventually get a length of dryer duct pipe and cut a hole for it in a  
piece of sheet metal (wood might catch fire if the smoke is too hot)  
to prop in the open window. (Or I could spend a couple of grand to  
put in a vented range hood--let's see what's left over after our  
son's college tuition).
On Oct 16, 2005, at 5:57 AM, Mr Gnome wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com

76) From: Mike Chester
Kirk,
Thanks for the input.  I ended up ordering the I-Roast 2.  It seemed like it 
had the most features for the money and is still a current model, so parts 
and service should not be a problem for awhile.  How do you like yours? 
What kind of results do you get with the pre-programmed settings.  I have a 
good range hood with outside exhaust, so smoke should not be a problem.  I 
also have a variac and accurate meters so I can make sure that I get a 
constant input voltage.  I also have a lot to learn.  I have slowly reading 
through the SM library, and some FAQs elsewhere.  This has given me some 
idea what the posters here are talking about.
Mike
<Snip>

77) From: Mr Gnome
It's getting cold where I am so roasting outdoors won't work.  The i roast 
won't work under what, 60F I think.
I've got the i roast connected to the kitchen ceiling fan/vent.  I replaced 
the grill with a cover made out of plywood with a 7" hole cut in it, a 7" 
dryer hose coupling and a 10' lenth of flexible 7" aluminum dryer duct.  
When it's time to roast I hook the machine up and go.  The vent attachment 
that came with the machine didn't fit on too tight so I bent the tines a bit 
to get a more solid fit.  Unfortunately one of the tines broke off but 
aluminum duct tape does a good job fixing it back on.
The whole set up is pretty ugly and my wife is amused by it but it does the 
trick.  No fire alarms even with dark roasts.  I worry a little about the 
draw from the ceiling fan cooling things down during roasting, though.
Kirk
<Snip>
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78) From: Mr Gnome
Hey Mike,
The i roast 2 works great.  It's fun to experiment and I've been looking for 
roasting settings but so far the suggestions are for the 3 stage original 
roaster.  I'd like to get some 5 stage suggestions.
The first pre programmed setting, preset 1, is 450F at 10 min. With 6 oz of 
Ethiopian Harrar Grd 4, unvented, it set off all the smoke alarms and 
roasted to a dark, oily roast.  Tasted just like Starbucks.
The second preset I think is 455F/6:00, 400F/4:00, 435F/1:30 with 3oz of 
Harrar and it roasted to I think what was just into a city roast.   I found 
the pre programmed preset times on the i Roast web site since the R2 came 
with an insert modified R1 manual and didn't list the new R2 presets.  
Unfortunately I found two separate 3 stage settings listed for preset 2 so 
I'm not exactly sure which one applies to the machine I got.  And, wouldn't 
you know it, just about 4 min into the preset 2 test roast, the smoke alarms 
reminded me that I hadn't hooked up the franken-vent hose so I had to 
scramble to pull batteries hookthe roaster up.  That was a pain.  The top 
get's pretty hot and the adapter doesn't stay on too well when you're 
sliding a hose over it on the fly.  I missed monitoring times and temps of 
the cycles for a few minutes.
Anyway, the preset 2 roast is still degassing.  I tried a 475F/7:00, 
370F/4:00, 425F/400 and got a nice deep city roast that I think just got 
into second crack.  A little oil after degassing overnight but the grind was 
dry and I liked the brew.  It still tasted bright, acidic and smooth with a 
hint of earthy smokiness.
From what I hear Hearthenware is good about standing behind their products.  
I don't know how long Hearthenware has been in business making i Roasts.  
I'm assuming it's not too long so I look at the i Roast as a hit or miss- 
sometimes a new product's bugs make it less durable and reliable but other 
times new products can be over engineered to take stresses that make them 
last forever.  The i Roast seems to be pretty solid so I'm hoping they over 
engineered the 2nd generation when they debugged the original.
Knowing I have no previous roasting experience and this is my first roaster, 
  I like it.  It's the 3rd week for me and I've done in about 2 lbs of beans 
and so far I'm pleased with the machine and glad I went with it.
Kirk
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79) From: robert Howell
I have been using caffee rostos for six years or so.  I live deep down in Mexico so servicing is a problem.  Having experienced the normal problems with the rosto, I now stock three of them and a couple of extra boards that have the heating coil and resister or thermostadt control.  I have even by passed the thermostadt a couple of times. Over time I have had the units replaced a couple and now have two  roasters that  have never been used until a couple of days ago.  Now, as many of you know, Brightway Industries no longer has the model and the manufacturer in Korea is not producing them for the time being.l
   
  The machine I was using seemed to not be roasting well so I pulled it off the line (I will give it a good cleaning and see if I can get it back in service).  The new machine performs very well with one exception, and this is a new one on me.  The timer does not work.
   
  Has anyone had experience with this???
   
  Thanks,
   
  Bob Howell
  robertohowell
  Rincon de Guayabitos,
  Mexico
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80) From: Marc
Bob,
Since I've modded my Rostos, I do not use the timer at all - I would just
swap it out with another one from your spare . If you want to pay for the
shipping I can pull my timer out and send it to you (my re-wiring completely
bypassed the timer).
-Marc
On 9/25/06, robert Howell  wrote:
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HomeRoast Digest