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Topic: BBQ roaster (26 msgs / 526 lines)
1) From: Paul Jolly
You should check out Jim Gundlach's setup.  He's
the Alabama Pecan Man.  Look by author at April's
thread; he's posted links to some photos.  Now,
it's not a rotisserie, but it looks mighty good.
Paul
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2) From: jim gundlach
on 5/16/01 1:52 PM, Paul Jolly at pauljolly65 wrote:
<Snip>
Jim Gundlach here.
   I've been looking for material to make a roaster to fit on a spit.  Right
now I am off to Oklahoma to spend time with my mother while she dies.  I got
as far as to find someone that makes material that would be easy to adapt.
Go to:
 http://www.newcan.com/tubes.html  If someone would contact them about small purchases maybe we could
collectively get enough interested people to make a minimal purchase.  I
would look for stainless steel about 5 to 5 inches in diameter and 9 to 12
inches long with 1/8 holes spaced at 3/16 in a diagonal pattern.
Off to morn.
   jim
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3) From: Jim McClellan
I checked the site Jim G mentioned, gave me an idea. They use those
perforated tubes as filters for irrigation. We have that here! I have called
one of the local irrigation equipment suppliers, they think they have what I
describe as a replacement part for a dragon filter. I'll try and get out
there tommorrow and check it out. Will post availablility and pricing when I
know if it will work.
Thanks for all the helpful suggestions!
Jim M
Jim Gundlach here.
   I've been looking for material to make a roaster to fit on a spit.  Right
now I am off to Oklahoma to spend time with my mother while she dies.  I got
as far as to find someone that makes material that would be easy to adapt.
Go to:
 http://www.newcan.com/tubes.html  If someone would contact them about small purchases maybe we could
collectively get enough interested people to make a minimal purchase.  I
would look for stainless steel about 5 to 5 inches in diameter and 9 to 12
inches long with 1/8 holes spaced at 3/16 in a diagonal pattern.
Off to morn.
   jim
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4) From: Monty Harris
Hi Jim,
Sorry about your Mom!
I'd think the spiral lockseam louvered tube in aluminum would be a good
fit.  The spirals would help to tumble the beans rather than slip around
the inside of the tube.  I suggested aluminum because it conducts heat more
efficiently and evenly but I could be wrong.  It seems to me the gourmet
chef pans tout those properties, anyhow.
I may be interest in experimenting with a hunk of the tube if you need a
minimum quantity for the order.
Monty
At 03:14 PM 5/16/01 -0500, you wrote:
<Snip>
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5) From: Mike Geis
I have what is, in effect, a BBQ roaster, namely, the old-style roaster I
mentioned in another post.  It consists of a metal rectangular box with air
holes along the bottom and a cylindrical drum, with a very nice sliding door
that allows inspection of bean color, that is rotated by a spit stuck
through it with an attached handle.
My experience with it suggests that an actual BBQ roaster may not be very
efficient.  If I don't have a substantial amount of hot coals pretty close
to the drum it bakes rather than roasts.  However, in the case of the BBQ,
there is normally a top that would hold heat.  If I do have sufficient heat,
the roaster roasts beans very quickly.  I am going to talk to a local welder
type near where I live to see what he would charge to fabricate such a
thing.  It is far superior IMO to an actual BBQ roaster.  A professional
metal working company said it would probably cost around $400 for his people
to fabricate it.
For details and a description of how I think it was put together can be
found athttp://home.columbus.rr.com/zeitgeis/Spanishroaster.htmlMike Geis

6) From: Jeffrey A. Bertoia
 
Try this...http://www.johnsonscreens.com/products.aspUS Filter / Johnson screens is a client of mine.  They specialize
in making filtration products out of stainless steel wire.
Regardless of final shape all the screens are built in cylinders.
They are made by wrapping stainless steel wire around stainless
steel rods so that you end up with an aerated SS tube of any
diameter from about 1 inch to 4 feet.  They are quite sturdy,
some of the samples that I have are made from SS wire 1 mm cross
section.
I have often thought of replacing the drum on my ALP.  It would
certainly solve the problem of roasting small beans.
In fact they make well screens (well points) for water wells.
Well screens are available in 2, 4, 6 & 8 inch diameters.  These
are certainly more than adequate.
jeff
jim gundlach wrote:
<Snip>
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7) From: Steve D
<Snip>
<Snip>
beans rest for that fabled 2 to 3 days before
<Snip>
All right! I like it! - Steve
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8) From: Glenn R. Holmes
I'm convinced. 
I saw an oldtime mesh corn popper at a Trunk sale Saturday. 
I'll go get it this weekend, shine it up and give it a run.
Should be fun.
The guy said he also has a collection of old vac pots.
He said he'd bring them along for me to look at. Hope he does. 
Glenn 
Steve D wrote:
<Snip>
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9) From: Charles Jacobs
 
I wanted to show a few pictures of the elusive Saeco/Estro BBQ 
roaster in action.  A few weeks ago an inspired roaster built a 
roaster like this one from scratch.
You can find them athttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://home.adelphia.net/~cnjacobs/roast/coffee.htmlhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

10) From: Jim McClellan
Nice roaster - wish they still made it!
Maybe now that home roasting seems to finally be catching on, someone will
reintroduce such a device - a whole lot less expensive (and better flavor
IMHO) than the home roasters now offered.
<Snip>
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11) From: jim gundlach
on 7/3/01 7:59 PM, Charles Jacobs at cnjacobs wrote:
<Snip>
That is absolutely great.  I'm still looking for a source for perforated
stainless steel sheet metal.
  Jim Gundlach
  Roasting over pecan wood fires
  In Shorter, Alabama
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12) From: EuropaChris
Jim,
Have you looked in a McMaster-Carr catalog?  If they don't have it, you don't need it.
I have one at my desk at work (I'm home today, of course).  I'll look at it when I get into the office tomorrow.
My thoughts are to try something along these lines, but rig it so it has a built-burner (shoot, get a replacement burner from a gas grill store).  A little creative sheet metal work and you could have a pretty slick gas fired drum roaster.
Only problem is the weather.  We seemingly spend 11 months out of the year in winter and have a month of summer.  When it's zero outside, the thought of firing up a roaster outside doesn't seem like a fun thing, and that is precisely when I want coffee the most, not when it's 90 outside (well, OK, iced coffee...)
Chris
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13) From: Bearhair
EuropaChris wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
   Whaddya mean, LOOK at a CATALOG???? www.mcmaster.com !!!!
   Type "sheet metal" into the product search.
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14) From: jim gundlach
on 7/4/01 7:53 AM, EuropaChris at EuropaChris
wrote:
Chris,
   Thanks for the lead to McMaster-Carr.  They have a web catalog with
on-line ordering that is quite efficient and easy to use.  I found
perforated brass sheet 24" by 12" for about $12.50 and ordered it today.
With it I will be able to build a drum that is about 5.5" in diameter and
12" long with end pieces of the same material.  If I find some other
material for the end pieces, I could have a drum that is about 7.5" in
diameter. All I have to add is material to agitate and support the drum on
the spit. 
   I clearly don't have the weather problems you do.  But in the winter, I
have a wood fired furnace under the house that I do most of our heating
with.  When I need to roast coffee I just build a fire with the right kind
of wood and when I have a good bed of coals, I put in a short log to rest
the end of the fireplace popcorn popper on and roast the beans there.
   Anyone else who loves to tinker and has difficulty finding stuff should
check out McMaster-Carr's site:
    
    http://www.mcmaster.com/   Jim Gundlach
   roasting over pecan wood fires
   in Shorter, Alabama
<Snip>
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15) From: Bearhair
jim gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
   You were looking for stainless steel earlier - why the change to
brass?
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16) From: jim gundlach
on 7/4/01 12:44 PM, Bearhair at bearhair wrote:
<Snip>
   They only have stainless steel in the perforation pattern I want in
sheets that are 36" by 40" at a cost off about $80.00 to $150.00 depending
on thickness.  That would enough to make about six drums, not a bad price if
I wanted to make six.  I was considering it until I saw the brass in a size
to make one for $12.49 plus shipping.  I thought I could buy a lot of green
beans for the difference.
   Jim Gundlach
   Roasting over pecan wood fires
   in Shorter, Alabama.
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17) From: Jim McClellan
Jim,
I hope you will post pics when you are through building!
Good luck!
Jim M
<Snip>
if
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18) From: Charles Jacobs
 
Jim,
The ends of the Saeco/Estro BBQ roaster are made from solid aluminum 
(the entire drum is perforated aluminum).  The center of each 
endpiece has a machined connector which clamps on to the spit. 
However, if you purchase a rotisserie set it has skewers which pierce 
the meat and attach to the spit.  If you are making a home roaster 
you could put small holes in your endpieces and insert the skewers 
into the holes and then clamp the skewers onto the spit!
The agitiation is performed with four 1/4 inch fins on the inside of 
the drum.  The fins do not quite go to the end of the drum so that 
you can slide the endpiece so it rests about 1/4 inch from the end of 
the drum.
One of the technical problems I have is that the clamps sometimes 
come loose from the spit.  This can cause an endpiece to come loose 
and beans to spill into the fire - eegads!  In order to prevent this 
I also use a few paper clamps around the outside of the endpiece to 
clamp it to the drum.
I'll add a few more pictures to my site over the next day or so.
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19) From: EuropaChris
No problem!  They do have stainless 304 perforated sheet, too.  A bit more pricey, but you'd be assured it wouldn't deform and such.  Brass has a much lower melting temp, but that shouldn't be a problem at coffee roasting temps.  Lots easier to work with too.  Stainless is a pain.
Chris
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20) From: Jim Brockman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Just thought I'd put in my two cents worth. After reading Ed Needham's =
web site for bbq roasters I purchased the Front gate stainless steel =
waste basket while they were on closeout several months ago.  I crafted =
a rotisserie to the basket and sealed the open end with an 8" aluminum =
commercial grade lid.  I have added 4  1" aluminum fins to the basket =
for better bean mixing.  I am using 2 8"x8" quarry tiles directly under =
the drum to disperse any direct heat. The protocol can be seen at Ed' s =
web site :http://www.homeroaster.com/brockman.htmlAfter several months of trial and error I am using the following roast =
profile:
I place 1 # of beans in the unit and place in the preheated bbq at 350 =
degrees and slowly ramp up to 450 degrees over a 10 minute period and =
hold at 450-460 degrees.  My Weber grill has a built-in thermometer.  I =
get first crack at approx. 17 minutes and 2nd crack starts at 21-22 =
minutes.  I can visualy check the roast with a bright flash light by =
raising the lid slightly. At first sign of smoke I pull the basket and =
quicky cool in a large s/s collinder.  This process gives me a very =
uniforn full city roast.  This afternoon I roasted 4 pounds of beans in =
less than 2 hours.  Works for me.   Jim Brockman in Orlando, Fl.

21) From: Ed Needham
Jim...Your experience is very similar to mine except for my measured temps
are higher, and I start fast and slow it down as the beans progress through
first crack.  I think my thermometer is reacting to direct heat and giving a
false high reading.  I am using 4"x4" ceramic tiles, but mine are molded with
hundreds of holes in them, so direct heat can come through, but it's
diffused.  I may try a solid tile just under my thermometer to see what kind
of temps I get.  My readings are 500F to 525F for a 20 to 22 minute roast to
second crack.
I am spoiled by the BBQ grill concept.  My roasts are the best I've ever had
and the large (13oz. for me) batch sizes save so much time.  I also purchased
the Frontgate waste cans, but I haven't used mine yet for a roast drum.
Soon, very soon.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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22) From: EskWIRED
<Snip>
The BBQ grill idea makes a LOT of sense for the home roaster.  Does it still
get hot enough in frigid weather?
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23) From: Ed Needham
I'll soon find out.  I don't expect a problem though.  I use my grill all
winter, and it works fine without any problems.  Many times I go out and turn
it on to first melt the ice and snow from it before grilling.  I'm
considering moving it to my detached garage where I can open the large door
(for safety from Carbon Monoxide) and roast in a more comfortable and warmer
setting, out of the elements.  I'll report back if there is a problem.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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24) From: EskWIRED
<Snip>
I wouldn't worry terribly much about CO from propane.  People use unvented
ovens and stovetops and water heaters without a problem.  Gasoline (or
coleman fuel) burners are a problem, however.
An innovative nutcase :) like you might enjoy alt.food.barbecue.
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25) From: Ed Needham
I prefer 'eccentric', but 'nutcase' will do just fine .  Normal is
boring.
As to the alt.food barbecue newsgroup.  It sounds like a winner.  I might
just take a quick peek (as if I need 'more' to read on the internet).  Just
reading this homeroast list (which has been very prolific lately) and
alt.coffee sets me back 'at least' an hour each evening.
Anyway, thanks for the heads up on the BBQ list.
Ed Needhamhttp://www.homeroaster.comed
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26) From: John Ross
on or about 2/11/03 7:12 PM, homeroast-request at
homeroast-request wrote:
<Snip>
I mostly lurk here.
I enjoy it so much, in so many different ways, I feel I ought to contribute,
especially since participating i the group buy of Rocky grinders.
But I was remembering the old San Francisco roaster the guy up the street
has and remembering him trying the beans and I suddenly thought of a lilttle
portable cement mixer...a drum of greater diameter but shallow, driven from
bits back and you tip it to dump it onto a cooling surface.
Its drive would be out of the heat--a large door with the tryer could be of
pyrex (stationary like a front load laundry washer or drier--at the heat
levels this might be a design challenge), BBQ burners ranged on the bottom
the whole enshrouded with sheet metal that went to a chimney.
Just a notion...I have stated my contentment with my Poppers and with
simplicity enough times, here and more distant in the past at altDotCoffee.
John Ross
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