HomeRoast Digest


Topic: "new coffee?" (13 msgs / 235 lines)
1) From: Les
I vac potted my first grind with the new Mazzer burrs this morning.  I
ground up the last of the Brazil 143.  Of course I was going to be
bias and think that it tasted better.  Hey, I just forked out bucks
for these new burrs!  I hadn't told my wife about the change and
handed her a cup of coffee.  When I came out she said, "Wow, what kind
of coffee is that?  Is it a new one?"  I asked her what was different.
 She said it was much sweeter and complex.  My guess is that with the
new burrs have gotten rid of a lot of bitterness and the cup profile
is cleaner so it tastes more complex.  I did notice a much sweeter cup
myself.
Les

2) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
My guess it is the absence of dust since it is now being deposited in the
grinder internals. In a week or so, you will be getting more dust and some
stale dust from previous grinds, and you will definitely taste it.
--

3) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
<Snip>
I have always felt there is going to be a certain amount of residue 
in grinders, and the bet thing you can do is not to disturb it. I 
can't possibly keep the inside of by grinders clean (like the 
ditting). I have had bad results every time I try to clean it, and it 
takes a while to get rid of bad tastes. Another funny experience; I 
once tried to grind a really HOT batch of fresh roasted coffee - I 
mean, I pulled it out of the cooling cycle early so it was probably 
around 200 f still. I ran it through this Bunn g-2 burr mill and the 
smell was HORRIBLE as was the coffee in the cup. Seems as though the 
heat loosened old coffee oils on the burrs and in the housing. I will 
never, ever do that again...
This problem of keeping grinder internals clean makes me sorta 
appreciate the simplicity of the old whirling blade. Think what you 
may, but it is cheap, you can clean it, and they tend to last a long 
time.
Tom
-- 
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                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george

4) From: Will
Perhaps you ought to run some dry, cracked rice through to clean the burrs,
then run one of Tom's cheaper Mexicans through to remove the residual rice.
Works for me. 
Will

5) From: John Blumel
On Mar 8, 2005, at 4:02pm, Will wrote:
<Snip>
I'm not sure what you mean by "cracked rice" but, since it is much 
harder than the roasted coffee beans grinders are designed for, running 
raw rice grains through your grinder could, conceivably, shorten the 
life of your burrs or other grinder components by stressing them beyond 
their designed for levels.
John Blumel

6) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
<Snip>
Instant rice is softer/less dense
Tom
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                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george

7) From: John Blumel
On Mar 8, 2005, at 4:41pm, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>
Yes, it's already been (at least partially) cooked. Is that the same as 
"cracked rice"?
John Blumel

8) From: Will
On 3/8/05 3:17 PM, "John Blumel"  wrote:
<Snip>
I have an old Estro 420 that I bought at Starbucks back in the dark ages.
Rice was recommended as an infrequent cleanser. So I suspect most burr
models can manage it. It is much smaller than beans so you have to trickle
it in. I run a a 1/3 cup thru the most coarse setting and then 1/3 cup thru
at mid-range. 
I think Tom's suggestion of instant rice is probably the safest bet.

9) From: Justin Marquez
Hey - do you suppose that a load of hot beans is a way to remove the
stale oils...? Just skip the brewing part!  Just a thought based on
your experience.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)http://www.justinandlinda.com Deja Moo: The feeling that you've heard this bull before.
On Tue, 8 Mar 2005 12:52:40 -0800, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
 wrote:
<Snip>
--

10) From: Brett Mason
Followed by 2 cups of uncooked rice.
Served with a sprig of mint, Martha Stewart says this will be good.
...
:-)
On Tue, 8 Mar 2005 16:49:51 -0600, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

11) From: Brett Mason
Just fyi...
Not that they would know anything about the design, construction, use
or cleaning of conical burr grinders, but Zassenhaus publishes the
following:
How to take proper care of your grinder.
Spring cleaning to ensure delicious coffee.
You should clean your grinder at least once a year. Over time, the oil
that is contained in every coffee bean is deposited on the grinding
mechanism. If the oil turns rancid, e.g. on hot days, even the
freshest coffee tastes bitter. The only way to restore the delicious
flavour of the coffee is to clean the grinder.
Quick clean
Briefly grind a few grains of raw, uncooked rice. This is the best and
most environmentally-friendly way to remove the oil residue from the
coffee in the grinding mechanism. Grind a few coffee beans afterwards
and the grinder is ready to be used again for making aromatic coffee
or espresso.http://www.zassenhaus.com/p_e/tipp_kaffee.htmlRegards,
Brett

12) From: DEchelbarg
In a message dated 3/8/2005 4:20:15 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
johnblumel writes:
I'm not sure what you mean by "cracked rice" but, since it is much 
harder than the roasted coffee beans grinders are designed for, running 
raw rice grains through your grinder could, conceivably, shorten the 
life of your burrs or other grinder components by stressing them beyond 
their designed for levels.
John Blumel
Minute rice -- so soft you can crunch it with your teeth.

13) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
It is my experience that the dust will build up until it reaches a constant
level. But there will be times when pieces of this stale buildup will come
off into the grounds and into your cup.
To prove my point about cleanliness (to myself at least), yesterday I
removed the top burr carrier and brushed out all of the dust accumulation
from my Tranquilo. I even used a pipe cleaner to get the underside of the
bottom burr and the grounds sweeper. I do nothing about removing coffee
oils, in fact I do not see any oil deposit anywhere, only dry dust. The cups
since the cleaning have been much better. I was getting some odd flavors the
past 3 roasts and was thinking the roasts were off, but it was definitely
the grinder.
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HomeRoast Digest