HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Turkish - First Take (17 msgs / 344 lines)
1) From: Jason Brooks
Greetings all,
    I'm posting from a Lebanese restaurant/coffee shop/wireless hot spot
in Blacksburg, VA.  If you don't know, and probably don't care too
much, I'm here taking a class in Intrusion Detection Analysis.  Just
paid for the certificate (GIAC GCIA), so I guess I'm in.  But to the
coffee - I purchased a Turkish, myu first.  So, what should I be
tasting?  It's interesting, but is spproaching a burnt taste, but not
quite there.  I am not familiar with the taste of cardomon, so I don't
know if that's it.  Any suggestions for a Turkish newb?
Shalom,
Jason

2) From: Tim TenClay
Jason,
I've never had Turkish at a Lebanese restaurant, but in Turkey I never
experienced a "burnt" taste.  Cardamon is a distinct flavor, almost a
little numbing when mixed with coffee.
My (albeit limited experience) with Turkish coffee is that it's
strong, thick, sweet (some use more sugar than others) but a very
basic "coffee" flavor.  Arabic coffee (often sold by Kurds and those
harkening from south of Turkey) often has more spices in it.  I found
Turks to be purists.
By the way, don't stir the coffee - you'll get a mouthfull of grit.  
Take it for what its worth.
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
-- 
Rev. Tim TenClay
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com) NATA #253

3) From: john kahla
Hi Jason
You should have no taste of cardomon. Should be pure sugar and coffee.
A great caffine high and sugar rush. Now if you were doing it properly
there should also be a glass of ice water,  a shot of arrak, and a
backgammon board. You could replace the arrak with annisett or Pernod.
Does the spoon stand straight up when you put it in the cup? Enjoy.

4) From: Jason Brooks
I'm  back in the classroom now.  The taste after I got past the head was
less burnt and more coffee - espresso related.  It was not as sweet as an
espresso.  Boy, do I miss my machine!  Only till Sunday morn!  But, all in
all, Turkish was a pleasant drink.  I think I can now guarantee that I
won't fall asleep during class!
Jason
<Snip>

5) From: Jason Brooks
No spoon, no arrak, no water, no backgammon.  Wasn't bad, though.
Jason
<Snip>

6) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Jason,
      Neither Turkish coffee or cardamon should taste burnt.  I don't 
have the vocabulary to describe how it should taste but I can say that 
it should not be burnt.
            Jim Gundlach
On Mar 11, 2005, at 11:36 AM, Jason Brooks wrote:
<Snip>
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other way 
around."

7) From: Michael Dhabolt
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jason
And if you replace the arrak with Ouzo (notice the capital O), not only
could it be a "God Shot", you may even be able to talk to him (God that is)
- and get answers!!!  Its worked for me frequently in a past life (read -
sailor).  The backgammon board, though, is an absolute requirement.
Mike (just plain)
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8) From: Dennis Parham
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this is a nice site to explain spice flavors...   http://www.foodsubs.com/SpiceUniv.htmlDennis parham
On Mar 11, 2005, at 11:36 AM, Jason Brooks wrote:
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this is a nice site to explain spice flavors...  http://www.foodsubs.com/SpiceUniv.htmlDennis parham
On Mar 11, 2005, at 11:36 AM, Jason Brooks wrote:
Greetings all,
    I'm posting from a Lebanese restaurant/coffee shop/wireless hot
spot
in Blacksburg, VA.  If you don't know, and probably don't care too
much, I'm here taking a class in Intrusion Detection Analysis.  Just
paid for the certificate (GIAC GCIA), so I guess I'm in.  But to the
coffee - I purchased a Turkish, myu first.  So, what should I be
tasting?  It's interesting, but is spproaching a burnt taste, but not
quite there.  I am not familiar with the taste
of cardamon, so I don't
know if that's it.  Any suggestions for a Turkish newb?
Shalom,
Jason

9) From: Scott W
I had no idea there was a Lebanese restaurant in Blacksburg. I'd like
to go there to compare the coffee with what I make in my Ibrik (which
I still don't have right just yet). What's it called?
Scott (from Blacksburg)
On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 12:36:01 -0500 (EST), Jason Brooks
 wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Edward Spiegel
At 8:55 PM -0500 3/11/05, Scott W wrote:
<Snip>
When you get it right, can you post the trick? I have managed to brew some pretty good cups (though grinding fine enough for Turkish takes forever in the Zass) but never managed to brew a cup as magical as those that I had years and years ago at a little place in East Jerusalem.
I have tried everything in the range of 1 tsp to 2 tbsp of powdered coffee per 3 ounces of water in my small cevze. And I have been using 1 to 2 tsp of sugar added after the water but before the coffee. I have tried to find a copy of the Scientific American article about the physics of brewing Turkish coffee but haven't managed to find it on the net. (I'm too lazy to get to the library when it is open).
--E
p.s. If anyone has the magic formula, do share.

11) From: Angelo
Ed,
The first magical tip is to forget about recreating that time in East 
Jerusalem.  It may not have been as wonderful as all that. The memory has a 
tendency to forget the unpleasant details. Sort of like that first kiss. :-)
I often ask  what brand(s) of coffee are used when I'm in a mid-eastern 
restaurant. They'll sometimes proudly bring out a bag of pre- ground from 
their native country. Lord knows how long ago it was ground and has been 
sitting on the shelf.  I believe the finer the grind the shorter the window 
of freshness...
Another thing you might want to try is to grind with a whirley-bird. I 
would say that this is the only type of grinding where it excels.... It can 
produce talc in a very short time....
Good luck,
Angelo
<Snip>

12) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
On Mar 11, 2005, at 8:18 PM, Edward Spiegel wrote:
<Snip>
Edward,
     Do you have any idea about the date of the publication?  I can't 
find it with an online search of the last ten years of Scientific 
American.
          Jim Gundlach
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other way 
around."

13) From: Myron Joshua
If Ed's memory is of the cafe opposite Jaffa Gate..i have the same memory...
GREAT COFFEE!
myron

14) From: Edward Spiegel
At 11:56 AM -0500 3/12/05, Angelo wrote:
<Snip>
It really was that good. I was pretty tuned in to coffee at the time and spent weeks afterwards trying to get it right. As an fyi, we drank coffee everywhere and this one tiny place is the only one that stood out as being not of this world. They had the balance of sugar and cardamom just right and just the right consistency to the foam.
--E

15) From: David M. Lewis
At 12:13 PM -0600 3/12/05, Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
<Snip>
It was one of Jearl Walker's "Amateur Scientist" columns, which 
should bound the date for you somewhat. Unfortunately, it's been 
purged from my library, and my memory is, well, just as middile-aged 
as yours is.
Best,
	David
-- 
"A fool and his money are soon elected."
	- Kinky Friedman

16) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
David,
       I checked them all from when Jearl Walker left the column back to 
83, as far as Auburn's on-line index goes and I did not find it.
            Jim
On Mar 12, 2005, at 8:02 PM, David M. Lewis wrote:
<Snip>
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other way 
around."

17) From: David M. Lewis
At 9:05 PM -0600 3/12/05, Pecan Jim Gundlach wrote:
Hi Jim,
It must pre-date '83 then. I definitely remember it being in the 
Amateur Scientist column; I even found a beaker and tried it at the 
time.
Best,
	David
<Snip>
-- 
"A fool and his money are soon elected."
	- Kinky Friedman


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