HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Ok.. lesse if I've got this right... (12 msgs / 408 lines)
1) From: Cj. Aberte
I've been reading and rereading both at Maria's and on list. I admit I 
haven't gotten into the list archives (are there even archives?) but I've 
been cruising the Tiny Joy newsletters and been reading up on things I'm 
not even interested in doing right now  and looking at all the suggestions 
for getting started with the beans. Ok.. so what's UGH? Other than Ugandan 
beans I can't come up with anything "U" 
And please refine my ignorance! :)
If "someone" were starting from nearly dead zero (ok... maybe they own what 
they thought wasn't a too bad machine at one time) here's what I've gleaned 
from the list:
First purchases would be beans/popper/mill (or variations there of) 
assuming that the whole getup would have to be eased into. I'm thinking 
this route because I could at least get better results with the machine 
I've got for awhile and the mill seems to be about the most important thing 
that's going to improve what I've got presently. I know that ideally it's a 
matched set of course. Is it better to wait and pick up the pot/s at the 
same time or forge ahead? Is the quality severely compromised to the point 
that what you gain by roasting/grinding is negated by less than top notch 
preparation?
  Next would be a pot (mocha/french press). Then when they can - assuming 
stash amendments at regular intervals between - a Technivorm, etc.? Fair 
assumption allowing for changes in taste (who knows, maybe a better roaster 
comes before the Technivorm, vacuum pot, etc.)?
Any suggestions for amendment from those that know better and have 
experience to pass along? I certainly wish I could ditch the whole coffee 
setup but at least I'm more savy on why that stupid aluminum "espresso" 
stovetop pot thingy didn't work (years gone to a new home) and possibly why 
my K***** isn't a match for espresso either. Hey, at least the thing steams 
the milk decently .
Thanks to everyone that shared their suggestions for best beginner's beans 
too. Now once I get that UGH thing cleared up I'm nearly ready to jump in. 
Harvey could have yet another pickup to send cross country!
Cj. Aberte
Melbourne, FL  USA

2) From: Tom Ulmer
Cj...
The nice thing about starting from zero is that everything is a step
forward. Without knowing too many particulars, I would suggest choosing a
roasting method and jumping in. The other amendments will present themselves
as you become refined. This of course is simply my opinion. Best of times...
Cheers

3) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 06:48 3/20/2005, Cj. Aberte typed:
<Snip>
It is not an acronym.  It is just what it says - Ugh!  It is a coffee that 
Tom cupped, that for all accounts "should" be good, but just isn't - so as 
in "ugh, this is bad!"  It is an Arabica, so is a fine test and calibration 
bean for those first couple of roasts THAT YOU WILL THROW OUT :-)
<Snip>
By mill, do you mean grinder?  Yes, if you can afford to upgrade to a 
"real" grinder, that is a good place to start.  Do you even have one, or 
are you using ground coffee now?  What do you mean by pots?
<Snip>
That is a tough question.  The only safe answer is that it can be, but is 
not an absolute.  It is a gradient thing.  If  you are presently drinking 
stale, preground folgers, moving to a whirly blade, cool brewer, but fresh 
roast, I would expect it to be better, just not as good as it can get.
<Snip>
The brewing technique is up to your taste.  I like my drip and 
espresso.  Don't really care for the bother of mocha, FP or pour over.  The 
Technivorm is good.  I am also fully happy with my Cuisinart Brew Central.
Don't want for a better roaster - we have been waiting for years 
:-).  Seriously, YOU are the roaster and make or break the roast.
<Snip>
That stovetop espresso pot thingy is a mocha pot :)
<Snip>
Last thing - just for information, where are you at now with coffee, 
equipment and most importantly budget (which includes available funds and 
what you actually want to spend).  You don't HAVE to spend a lot to get 
going, but CAN if you want to.
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

4) From: AlChemist John
Sometime around 06:48 3/20/2005, Cj. Aberte typed:
<Snip>
It is not an acronym.  It is just what it says - Ugh!  It is a coffee that 
Tom cupped, that for all accounts "should" be good, but just isn't - so as 
in "ugh, this is bad!"  It is an Arabica, so is a fine test and calibration 
bean for those first couple of roasts THAT YOU WILL THROW OUT :-)
<Snip>
By mill, do you mean grinder?  Yes, if you can afford to upgrade to a 
"real" grinder, that is a good place to start.  Do you even have one, or 
are you using ground coffee now?  What do you mean by pots?
<Snip>
That is a tough question.  The only safe answer is that it can be, but is 
not an absolute.  It is a gradient thing.  If  you are presently drinking 
stale, preground folgers, moving to a whirly blade, cool brewer, but fresh 
roast, I would expect it to be better, just not as good as it can get.
<Snip>
The brewing technique is up to your taste.  I like my drip and 
espresso.  Don't really care for the bother of mocha, FP or pour over.  The 
Technivorm is good.  I am also fully happy with my Cuisinart Brew Central.
Don't want for a better roaster - we have been waiting for years 
:-).  Seriously, YOU are the roaster and make or break the roast.
<Snip>
That stovetop espresso pot thingy is a mocha pot :)
<Snip>
Last thing - just for information, where are you at now with coffee, 
equipment and most importantly budget (which includes available funds and 
what you actually want to spend).  You don't HAVE to spend a lot to get 
going, but CAN if you want to.
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

5) From: Pecan Jim Gundlach
Cj,
      There are several roasting methods to start with.  If I were to 
start over, with the benefit of hindsight, I would start with the 
dogbowl heatgun method.   You can see, smell, hear, and control the 
entire process.   Also, you can adjust the size of the roast so you can 
experiment with relatively small batches while learning and risk fewer 
good beans while roasting.
      On ordering beans, get the 8 pound sampler and add two 2 pounders 
of other coffees that people on the list are talking about.   The 
sampler will give you a wide variety to explore and if you order 
something people on the list are talking about you can  take advantage 
of the expertise on the list from the start.
      Jim Gundlach
        Roasting over pecan wood fires in  La Place, Alabama
On Mar 20, 2005, at 8:48 AM, Cj. Aberte wrote:
<Snip>
"The espresso machine is an accessory to the grinder, not the other way 
around."

6) From: Ben Treichel
Cj. Aberte wrote:
<Snip>
I'd say that it is already fairly well refined ;-)
Seriously, (and specfically) the ultimate newbie kit should have:
A SM sampler,
A popcorn popper
A zass mill, (pick your fave, just not the turkish or grain)
a press pot.
Light years forward, minimal cost.
Ben

7) From: Brett Mason
Hi CJ,
Every individual step you take should improve your coffee experience...
UGH is listed on Tom's site at the bottom of the green coffee
selection - he offers but one pound.  This will let you watch color
changes, hear the first and second crack, even 3rd crack if you're
really into charcoal...  Be sure to order a pound...
The HeatGun DogBowl is a great starting point.  So is almost any
popcorn popper if you spend $2 at a garage sale and thrift store. 
Treat it as a learner, and pass it along to your inquisitive friends
as you upgrade along the way.
Technivorm will treat you awesome, but so will a good hi-temp brewer
such as the Clarity or the Scandinavian Presto.
The grinder/mill is really important.  I always recommend a zass to
start because of a great quality grind and control for less than $100.
 Occasionally they get purchased used or eBay etc., such as my last
one I got for $20.
The MokkaPot yoou threw away probably needed a coiarser grind of fresh
roasted anything.  Mine makes a great afternoon cup!  My French Press
sits on my desk at the office for my daily pots & sharing.  My Cory
VacPot is the weekend brewer, while my Clarity is the morning wakeup
pot.  My StarBucks Barista espresso machine is the shotmaker of choice
cause its the only one I got, and I picked it up used and broken for
$2.  The fix was free...
I have 3 hot air popcorn poppers, soon to go on eBay.  I have a
WhirlyGig popcorn maker that didn't do so good for me, but others love
that method.  I typically roast with a skillet on an outdoor burner,
with loads of 2.5 lb each roast.  And I just made a drum roaster which
is teaching me a lot (like beans burn!) - I haven't gotten this one
down yet, but my Nuke-French Roast from last night would make any
StarBucks seem undercooked.  Hope to not do that again...
Welcome to the pursuit...
By the way, once you get the coffee down, ask Mike about good Q and
fine desserts to pair with your excellent coffee....  He might mention
Kona.
Brett
I have 3 
On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 09:48:08 -0500, Cj. Aberte
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

8) From: Cj. Aberte
At 10:28 AM 3/20/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
And I take it from that comment that you really *don't* want to even try to 
drink it? 
<Snip>
Yes and yes. Sad to say I settled for "everyday" stuff (pre-ground not 
quite Folgers) and a few *cough* special beans (also pre-roasted) with a 
bladed grinder, none of which enhanced the coffee experience much. I was 
kind of thinking of the Zassenhaus grain mill when SM has them back in 
stock. It would mean less equipment in the kitchen with more functionality 
for me as I'm also a brewer and bread maker.
You guys are brutal. Making a poor defenseless newbie confess all their 
horrendous coffee sins before the whole lot of you ;). Shame, shame  
<Snip>
I was thinking of starting off with a French press and Mocha pot since an 
espresso machine is kind of out of the question right now. I'm probably 
getting the terminology wrong but my sincere apologies. I admit I haven't 
read long enough to put the right words in the right places.
<Snip>
Well, then maybe my Krupps isn't such a bad place to begin with for the 
time being. Thanks!
<Snip>
While that technically might be true after looking around at SM and other 
coffee locations at various equipment that people have posted as well as 
their setups (WOW! - I admire the workshop almost as much as the basement 
roasting setup) I don't think I'd even deign to think what I had was a 
Mocha pot. At any rate it never worked. Couldn't get the water through the 
grounds even untamped and what came out was awful time after time. I'm 
willing to assume at least part of it was the maker (me) but since the 
water refused to rise, I'm also assuming mechanical difficulties. If it had 
worked I might have stuck with it, but after replacing the gasket several 
times it still was a bust. The next one will at least be stainless. ;)
See, guys? I really *am* reading! Even retaining a bit while I'm at it.
Cj. Aberte
Melbourne, FL  USA

9) From: John Blumel
On Mar 20, 2005, at 12:51pm, Cj. Aberte wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
I'm not sure what the implications are for coarser grinds, like would 
be used in a french press or moka pot, but I think you'd probably be 
better off with one of the Zassenhaus coffee grinders for coffee. They 
don't take up that much space. There's also a wall model, although, no 
one on the list admits to owning one.
John Blumel

10) From: Cj. Aberte
At 01:20 PM 3/20/2005, you wrote:
<Snip>
Ah, *HA* another good point to consider. Thanks. Good to know the good as 
well as the bad. Unfortunately my walls are nearly as full as the cabinets, 
so a wall model (unless I can get it to fit into the flowered and basketed 
living room walls somehow... hm) is not going to fly too well. Only wall 
bit is over the stove and I'm kinda sure that the coffee really wouldn't 
like being over that heat even for just a day or so between roasting and use.
Well, it does narrow my choices down to a more manageable size. All things 
to consider and unless you run into them you never know. With SM's good 
word on the mill in their pages I was thinking them nearly equal to the 
coffee mills. I've been headed off at that pass at least.
Thanks again! Keeping me outta trouble is a big help.
Cj. Aberte
Melbourne, FL  USA

11) From: Linux-by-choice
You will draw 20 to 1 comments on the Zass as you will the Mazzer!  Even 
if I didn't like it I'd keep it for the ouu ahh factor.
Mark Tosiello wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Mark Tosiello
I love my Zass 169 DG.  It's fabulous....and I've got a Mazzer Mini!
Mark


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