HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Old Greens, Oh Dear... (10 msgs / 220 lines)
1) From: Leslie Smith
Well, I'm a very on-again off-again home roaster, and having turned
back on again in February, I checked my stash of greens and discovered
that I still have loads of 02 crop stuff.  Figured I'd give it a shot
(no pun intended, I don't do espresso), what the hell.  Just tried
some 02 Mexican Esmerelda decaf.  Alas, it tastes kinda lousy.  Sigh,
sigh, sigh.  I have read that decafs age faster than cafs...  I drink
mostly decaf these days, too.  And I have been so proud of
home-roasted decaf in the past (so incredibly superior, esp with sweet
marias beans, to store bought decaf).
So, should I just dump all the 02 and 03 crop stuff in the trash, or
should I continue roasting and trying the stuff, dumping as I go (or
maybe finding the occasional still tasty bean)?
  - Leslie

2) From: George Holt
I've heard most decaf has about a six month shelf life.
On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:37:12 -0500, Leslie Smith
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Living Large In Waxhaw, NC.
George Holt

3) From: Brett Mason
Hi Leslie,
You might try offering the decaf to local neighbors or friends.  My
experience is the coffee I dislike still finds favor among others, and
if so you might be able to cook up some fine gifts for your neighbors,
friends, church, etc.
Keep roasting, you may find some gems!
Regards,
Brett
On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:37:12 -0500, Leslie Smith
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

4) From: HeatGunRoast heatgunroast
On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 06:37:12 -0500, Leslie Smith
 wrote:
((snip))
<Snip>
You appear to be answering your own question here, though it also
kills me to throw any beans away (hmmmm, is that really a bubble on
top of the can of tomato sauce with the '95 expiration date?), and it
makes a good case for disciplined stash-management (he reminds
himself).
Greg says,
"I've heard most decaf has about a six month shelf life."
This has not been my experience, and it's not what I've heard.  In
fact, most people seem to be reluctant to attach a "use-by" date to
greens (even decafs?) unless they are clearly over the edge (3 years
certainly seems to qualify).  On the other hand, although I'm pretty
accomplished at all phases from bean selection and blending--to
roasting--to brewing, I still find it hard to pin a poor cup due to
old beans rather than other variables of roasting and brewing.  Have
you had enough trials with these beans to be sure of what you are
tasting?  Are you confident that you would be making the same cupping
evaluation if you did not know the crop dates?  Does it even matter? 
As soon as the old beans are tossed, you'll forget about it.
Martin

5) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
There's a reason roasting businesses love the French Roast! Here's 
your opportunity to char coffee... seriously, while you lose more 
weight in French roasting, effectively making the coffee more 
expensive, you can obscure the quality of the coffee behind the 
roast. Bagginess can be hidden, unfortunately, this way.
Tom
-- 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george

6) From: Gene Smith
<Snip>
Why not distribute some of them to interested members to see if they get 
similar results?  Seems a shame to just throw them out.
Gene Smith
riding the wild learning curve, in Houston

7) From: Leslie Smith
  On the other hand, although I'm pretty
<Snip>
Actually, the Mexican Esmerelda decaf '02 was a favorite of mine last
time I roasted it, maybe in the fall of '03.  This batch was from a
2-lb bag, which I only buy when I really liked the initial 1-lb bag. 
I keep a log of roasts with comments on flavor. The flavor I got last
night was definitely something new (or rather, old), unfamiliar, and
possibly what Tom means when he talks about "baggy" flavor.   My
roasting method is pretty much always the same (whirly pop over
electric stove w/cast iron heat diffuser, mostly roasting by sounds
and smells, to very early snaps of 2nd crack).  I will probably give
the rest of this batch to my husband to take to work (he's a lot less
picky than I about coffee flavor).  I'lll keep trial roasting  the
rest of the ancient decaf greens.  Thinking of making traditions out
of the old cafs, since I really don't drink them much.  Any chance
list members would be interested in some old greens?
  - Leslie

8) From: Jerry Procopio
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Of course we are!
Jerry
Leslie Smith wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Brett Mason
T R A D I T I O N !!!  
Of course we'd love to see an Ancient Greens Tradition!
Brett
On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 03:17:33 -0500, Leslie Smith
 wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
 HomeRoast
      __]_
   _(( )_  Please don't spill the coffee!

10) From: Philip Keleshian
Hi Tom,
While I am sure that what you said is true, I wouldn't necessarily call =
it unfortunate.  I have been able to turn some fairly nasty gift coffee =
into something marginally drinkable by putting it into my roaster for a =
few minutes.
Phil


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